New book review online

 


Sonic Agency: Sound and Emergent Forms of Resistance - Brandon LaBelle. London: Goldsmiths Press, 2018.


Reviewed by Johnny Herbert



Call for papers: Un/Sounding the Relational City

 

 

“Un/Sounding the Relational City” is the Spring 2020 conference organized by the Music Department of New York University’s Graduate School of Arts & Science. The conference invites participants to ask how the sonic politics of urban space and the rhetoric of soundness provide a critical vantage into the role of sound and music, real or imagined, in organizing or disorganizing urban life. The conference will feature programming in the form of traditional academic paper presentations as well as live performances and audiovisual work.

Please check http://as.nyu.edu/music/events/2019-2020-events/un-sounding-the-relational-city.htmlfor more information on the conference.

Conference dates: February 28-29, 2020

For more information contact: relationalcity@gmail.com

Conference committee: Brian Fairley, Sofy Yuditskaya, Charlie Kozey, D Baron, David Catchpole, Samuel Chan, Annie Garlid, Nir Cohen, Heather Woodson-Gammon, Michael Seltenreich, Zeke Levine, Merche Blasco

Faculty Advisor: Brigid Cohen

 

 

Call for Presentations


 


Journal of Sonic Studies - New issue online: Materials of Sound II (guest editor: Caleb Kelly)


This is the second issue of the Journal of Sonic Studies focused on the Materials of Sound. In the first issue (see issue no. 16) the papers were focused on creative sonic production that engaged materials. In this issue, material sounds are found within cultures, cities, religions, movement, environmental catastrophe, and the murmurs of the crowd. The authors hear these sounds that, for the most part, are already in the world. These sonic occurrences form the basis of a developing understanding of the materials involved. 


By thinking about sound as more than its physical properties, more than a series of waves, we can begin to learn about complex material realities. The essays in both journal issues depart from the question: what can sound tell us about materials?


Journal contents:

Editorial: Materials of Sound II - Caleb Kelly

The Failed Assemblage of Batroun Concrète: A Biopsychosocial Approach to Post-acousmatic Composition - Seth Ayyaz

Eroding Together: Mattering Processes of Sound - Samuel Thulin

Animas: Disaster, Data, and the Resonance of a River - Brian House

Beyond the Azhan: Abu Dhabi’s Cacophonous Soundscape - Diana Chester

The Murmur of the Crowd - Andrew Brooks


 



ISSTA 2019: PERFORM! Irish Sound, Science and Technology Association Annual Conference and Festival – Call for papers


 

CIT Cork School of Music, Union Quay, Cork, Ireland


October 31 and November 1, 2019.


Keynote lecture and performance: Robert Henke

Keynote workshop/performance: Ellen King


Performance haunts our electronic music and sonic arts.


The technologies which facilitate our sonic creations transmit, but also sometimes obscure, the gestures of our sound production. Speakers, microphones and interfaces could be said to displace as they transmit or transduce. How much of the electronic music we hear is actually performed? How have our technologies changed our ideas of performance?


In the post-digital age, we often see an intermingling of technologies, terminologies and approaches, encompassing electroacoustic/computer/electronic music and sound-art. The terminology and descriptors are now becoming irrevocably entangled as a surge of new performers rise amidst the deluge of new hardware and software tools. As this cross–pollination occurs, the so-called cultural underground that originally supported this music appears to be very much ‘overground’ and alive, peddling its wares (equipment as well as music) with increasing prolificacy and achieving ever–increasing globalised acceptance. Should a new language be invented to define and discuss this music, or should the existing one be augmented? Or should we simply stop, listen, and enjoy the performance?


In 2019, ISSTA returns to Cork, to be hosted by the CIT Cork School of Music in association with Cork Sound Fair. The small city centre is teeming with live music performances, from gigs in small venues and pubs to regular festivals that welcome thousands of visitors to the city. Its musical history is rich in diversity. The Arcadia Ballroom, the Cork Orchestral Society, the Jazz Festival, the Opera House among others all brought national and international performers to audiences in the city. In the 21st century the City has experienced a musical Renaissance and today Cork has a wide array of active promoters and venues. We look forward to welcoming artists, technologists, theorists and other researchers to discuss the issues above at ISSTA 2019 in Cork.


Submission deadline is June 7, 2019; (midnight Irish and UK time).

Submission is via the Easychair system. Submitters should set up an Easychair account.

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=isstasoundconf2019

There are instructions for authors here:

https://easychair.org/smart-program/NICFD2016/instructions.pdf

Further details are available on the Cork School of Music website.

The call is open to all practitioners and researchers regardless of nationality. Participants are responsible for their own travel and accommodation.


Registration for ISSTA 2019 is required for participation. 

 

We aim to provide review notification by August 6th.

 



New book review online


Singed: Muted Voice-Transmissions, After the Fire Daniela Cascella. London: Equus Press, 2017

 

Reviewed by Adam Potts


 

 

Symposium - Transformations of the Audible, May 16–18, 2019, The Hague


Sonorous phenomena are always on the verge of becoming something else. As it unfolds, sound constitutes spaces, mediates presence, articulates time. Furthermore, it may prompt emotions, generate awareness, organise patterns of behaviour or trigger a sense of belongingAs sound becomes audible, sound is constantly being articulated within a series of adjacent circumstances.


Although these adjacencies have traversed the history of music, the past two decades have seen an unprecedented interest in sound from a range of artistic fields outside of music, as well as from a variety of academic disciplines. While Sound Art as an autonomous field reaches back to at least the late sixties, the last decades have seen the role of sound proliferate into a ubiquitous presence in museums and galleries across the globe. At the same time, the young field of Sound Studies has raised awareness of the role of the acoustic in defining ways of knowing, sensing and engaging with our surroundings. 


Composer Peter Ablinger stated in 2005 that he is “not interested in sounds, but in audibility”. Coming from an artist using sound as its main material, such a statement is significant: it appeals to a practice that instead of taking sound as a given deals with the mutable nature of hearing. Ablinger poses a challenge which is not that of working merely on organising sound, but in setting up conditions for the exploration of the way audibility is constituted.


Transformations of the Audible aims to interrogate the factors and conditions that inform the way audibilities are constituted. For this purpose it will gather artists, scholars, students and artist researchers from three domains – that of music, the arts and the scholarly field of sound studies – to address how artistic practices dealing with sound are traversed by and simultaneously operate on the ways in which listening takes place.


Transformations of the Audibleis initiated by the Institute of Sonology - University of the Arts The Hague, on the occasion of composer Peter Ablinger's visiting professorship, in partnership with Leiden University Academy of Creative and Performing Arts and arts organisation WEST Den Haag. The event will gather international experts in the field together with scholars, active researchers and practitioners from the local scene. It will comprise lectures, panel discussions and artistic presentations, taking place at WEST Den Haag, the Royal Academy of Art and the Royal Conservatoire.


Presenters and panel members include: 

Heloisa Amaral, Peter Ablinger, Joanna Bailie, Douglas R. Barrett, Richard Barrett, Giuliano Bracci, François Bonnet, Marcel Cobussen, Elizabeth Dobbin, Melissa van Drie, Ricarda Franzen, Raviv Ganchrow, Penelope Gouk, Eleni Kamma, Brian Kane, Julia Kursell, Yannis Kyriakides, Cat Lamb, Sander van Maas, Matteo Marangoni, Martina Raponi, Tao G. Vrhovec Sambolec, Linnea Semmerling, Suzan Tunca, Dafne Vicente Sandoval, Jed Wentz.


As part the symposium works by Peter Ablinger, Joanna Bailie, Catherine Lamb, Jakob Ullman and Simon Steen-Andersen will be performed, by Heloisa Amaral, Dafne-Vicente Sandoval, Ensemble Modelo62 and Andreas Borregaard.


Transformations of the Audible is curated and chaired by Gabriel Paiuk


Registration opens on April 8th - for more information on how to register follow this link:

https://www.universiteitleiden.nl/en/events/2019/05/symposium-transformations-of-the-audible


 

 

 

Tenth International Conference on Music and Sonic Art: Practices and Theories (MuSA 2019) – Call for Papers

 

 

We are pleased to announce the Tenth International Conference on Music and Sonic Art: Practices and Theories (MuSA 2019), an interdisciplinary event to be held in Karlsruhe, Germany at the Institute for Music Informatics and Musicology, University of Music Karlsruhe (http://hfm.eu/imwi/


Conference dates: 31 May – 2 June 2019

Keynote speaker: 

Professor Jane Ginsborg (Royal Northern College of Music, UK) 

Deadline for abstract submission: Friday, 29 March 2019 

Proposals for sessions and individual papers for the Tenth International Conference on Music and Sonic Art: Practices and Theories are invited from academics, independent researchers, practitioners and post-graduate students. Presentation formats include academic research papers (20 minutes + 10 minutes for discussion); reports on practice-based/artistic research or educational programmes (20 minutes + 10 minutes for discussion); and workshops, panel sessions, lecture-demonstrations (30 minutes + 15 minutes for discussion). The Conference committee encourages presentations in which practice forms an integral part of the research. All proposals will be ‘blind’ peer-reviewed. The conference language will be English. 


THEME AND TOPICS: 

The theme of MuSA 2019 is Collaborative Creativity / Creative Collaboration. The twenty-first century has witnessed some profound transformations in the institutional ethos of arts and humanities research, one of these being the sharp decline of the romantic image of the lone researcher and artist, breaking through the frontiers of knowledge or creating works of genius independently, and the simultaneous rise of a culture of collaboration. While much has already been written about the value of collaborative artistic and scholarly work, particularly in relation to the creative synergies it generates, much remains to be explored with regard to the notion of collaborative creativity or creative collaboration. MuSA2019 aims to explore the psychological, social, institutional-political, artistic and philosophical issues surrounding this notion. We invite submissions on the following, and other relevant topics, in relation to collaborative creativity and creative collaboration in Music and Sonic Art: 


- Creative collaboration and authorship 

- Creative collaboration in historical context 

- Psychological mechanisms of collaborative creativity 

- Creative collaboration and copyright 

- Collaborative creativity and technology 

- Pedagogies of creative collaboration 

- Expertise and creative collaboration 

- Creative collaboration and material cultures 

- Social contexts of collaboration 

- Artistic identities and creative collaboration 

- Embodied, embedded, enacted and extended approaches to creative collaboration 

Other topics that are in line with the conference’s broad aim of promoting interdisciplinary research within and across Music and Sonic Art will also be considered. 

As in previous MuSA conferences MuSA 2019 will continue to include the popular, one-day event devoted to ‘Re-thinking the Musical Instrument’, focusing on the origination, making and playing of musical instruments. 

Some of the topics that will be explored during this one-day event include: 

• The acoustical, musical, cultural, symbolic, and ritualistic qualities of musical instruments and the relationships between these (theoretically) distinct kinds of qualities; 

• The discourses that exist in relation to musical instruments in different genres, styles and traditions; 

• The gestural affordances and ergonomic principles of musical instruments and the musical meanings that emerge as a result of these affordances and principles; 

• Performers, improvisers and their instruments: phenomenologies of music making in the context of particular kinds of musical instruments; 

• Composer and instruments: the material, acoustical and expressive qualities of instruments and their relationship to musical languages composers create; 

• Relationships between creativity in performance, nature of musical interpretation and musical instruments; 

• The role of the musical instrument in the creation of musical identities; 

We also invite proposals on any research area related to the nature and use of western acoustical instruments, traditional ethnic instruments and digital/virtual instruments. 


ABSTRACT SUBMISSION: 

Please submit an abstract of approximately 250-300 words as an e-mail attachment to j.dack@mdx.ac.uk 

As contributions will be ‘blind’ peer-reviewed, please do not include information that might facilitate identification from the abstract. In addition, please include separately the name(s) of the author(s), institutional affiliation (if any) and short biography (approximately 100 words). Deadline for the receipt of abstracts is Friday, 29 March 2019. Notification of acceptance will be sent by 8 April 2019. 

CONFERENCE FEE– includes registration, lunch, coffee/tea and conference concerts 
€150 for delegates (day rate: €50), and €75 for students (day rate: €25) 

If additional information is required please contact Prof. Dr. Mine Doğantan-Dack 


CONFERENCE COMMITTEE: 

Prof. Dr. Mine Doğantan-Dack (University of Cambridge) – md787@cam.ac.uk 

Prof. Dr. Christoph Seibert (HfM Karlsruhe) – seibert@hfm.eu 

Dr. John Dack (Middlesex University, UK) – j.dack@mdx.ac.uk 

Prof. Miroslav Spasov (Keele University, UK) 

Prof. Dr. Marc Bangert (HfM Karlsruhe) 

Prof. DMA Damon T. Lee (HfM Karlsruhe) 

Prof. Dr. Paulo Ferreira Lopes (HS Mainz/HfM Karlsruhe) 

Dr. Stefanie Steiner-Grage (HfM Karlsruhe) 

Nanna Schmidt (HfM Karlsruhe) 

Timothy P. Schmele (HfM Karlsruhe) 

 

Administrative support: Gundi Rössler (HfM Karlsruhe) – roessler@hfm.eu 

 



New book review online


Noise and the Brain: Experience Dependent Developmental and Adult Plasticity - Jos J. Eggermont. Academic Press, 2013


Reviewed by Robert V. Harrison

 



DESFORM 2019 | DESIGN AND SEMANTICS OF FORM AND MOVEMENT, XI EDITION - Call for papers

OCTOBER 9-11, 2019

In recent decades, design has faced great challenges and profound transformations. Its traditional approach to crafting and shaping the tangible world has been revolutionized by the way this very world has changed, becoming infused with digital technologies that have made it smarter, more interactive, and more connected.

Recent technological developments have generated even more rapid and extreme changes. The emergence of AI, machine learning, flexible electronics, miniaturized and implantable sensors, and hybrid synthetic- biological materials have not only provided designers with new design ingredients, but also generated new cultural and social landscapes in which they must design.

This edition of the DeSForM conference will explore the implications of these recent and emerging technological transformations in the practice of design, with a particular focus on the aesthetics and human experience of these new systems.

Designing beyond intelligence means that the design of such advanced and smart ecosystems should consider issues beyond mere algorithmic thinking and functionality. Scholars in the design field should start reflecting on the connections and mutual relations between the performance of these intelligent ecosystems and their physical appearances, aesthetics, interaction modalities, and personalities. In doing so, they will be able to address the design of ecosystemic user experiences. 

DeSForM has traditionally dealt with the design of new, dynamic and interactive artifacts supported by the rise of intelligent systems (sensors, processors, algorithms, actuators, smart materials, etc.). Such systems are becoming more and more complex and sophisticated, giving birth to new forms of digital-physical hybridizations, i.e. dynamic ecosystems where advanced materials, sensing technologies, artificial intelligences, data, and humans are deeply interconnected and mutually shaped. These emerging hybrid ecosystems have already reached a point where their understanding, design, and evaluation ask for the development of new approaches and tools, as the experiences they create are far more complex to foresee and assess.

In this edition, we challenge scholars in this field to start thinking beyond designing for and with intelligence embedded into single artifacts, to broaden their focus and start addressing designing for distributed, hyperconnected, and complex intelligent ecosystems, and how their meaning, experience, and ethics can be approached in this new landscape.

This evolving context of design calls for new design skills and ways of thinking that go beyond the traditional field of design, as well as the creation of multi-disciplinary and adaptable teams able to envision new interactive, interconnected and even unpredictable systems.

The emergence of AI, robotic solutions, and big data connected with the spaces, objects and people we interact with everyday, will create new landscapes for future generations of designers. This will require designers to adopt new lenses in the design and evaluation of emerging technology, and it will necessitate that designers equip themselves with new ethical paradigms.

This conference will face the need to explore new frontiers for design, where emerging forms of distributed intelligence become design material. This material should be fully investigated in terms of tangible manifestations, implications and impact on the design process, user experience, and social consequences. The conference will be structured around four main topics: Experiencing Complexity, Interacting with New Intelligences, Societal Impacts & Design Ethics, and Future Roles of Designers.

Conference topics

Submissions should be focused on one or more of the following themes. In addition to these topics, contributions addressing the general conference interests (i.e. designing meanings, semantics and aesthetics of smart, dynamic and interactive artifacts) are also accepted.

EXPERIENCING COMPLEXITY

The role of aesthetics in dynamic digital-physical ecosystems

Designing and evaluating user experience in complex digital-physical ecosystems

Systemic design

Design tools to tackle complexity in technology-enriched systems

SOCIETAL IMPACTS & DESIGN ETHICS

Algorithmic decision making, autonomous systems and their impact on user experience and behavior

Designing for transparency and reliability

Emerging technologies and their effects on society

Design tools for ethics

Future challenges for design

INTERACTING WITH NEW INTELLIGENCES

How artificial intelligence transforms artifacts (objects, spaces) and their interaction modalities. 

Embodying artificial intelligence through design; tangible forms and appearances of AI

How products’ aesthetics and user experience will change through AI:

At home, living experience in the private domain

At work, working experience in the semi-public domain

In society, connected experience in the public domain

FUTURE ROLES OF DESIGNERS

In designing for complexity

In creating new forms of artificial intelligence and interactions with them

In designing for society

In designing with technology for social innovation

Submissions

We invite authors to submit high-quality, previously unpublished, original contributions that explore one or more conference topics. Submitted papers (both full and short) will be assessed through a double-blind review process and accepted papers will be published in the conference proceedings. Contributions can fall into one of the following categories:

Full papers (Oral presentation)

Full papers should be up to twelve pages (including references). Submissions should be anonymized for double-blind review. Accepted papers will be given a 20 minute presentation slot at the conference and will be included in the proceedings.

Short papers (Demonstration + Poster)

Short papers should be up to six pages (including references). Submissions should be anonymized for double-blind review. Short papers should describe actual design or art projects, which will be presented through live demos and posters during the conference. Submitters of short papers are also encouraged to provide in their papers a link to download media demonstrating their results, whether images, videos, or other media types. All content should be anonymized for double-blind review. Short papers will be included in the proceedings.

How to submit your paper

Please submit your proposal through the Easy-Chair platform. If you are a new user of Easy-Chair, you will be required to create an account. Once you are logged in, click again on the below link to ensure that you are visualizing the DeSForM 2019 page. The uploaded file must be in PDF format and should not exceed 20 MB.

See https://desform19.org for more information.


KEY DATES

NOV 15, 2018

Submission opening

MARCH 1, 2019

Full/Short paper submission deadline

MAY 1, 2019

Notification of acceptance

MAY 1, 2019

Conference registration opening

MAY 31, 2019

Camera ready paper deadline

MAY 31, 2019

Early bird registration closing

SEPT 15, 2019

Conference registration closing

SEPT 30, 2019

Seminar/Workshop registration closing

 

 


URBAN SOUND SYMPOSIUM | April 3-5, 2019 in Ghent, Belgium - Soundscape hackathon



The organizing committee of the International Urban Sound Symposium is proud to announce the first Soundscape Hackathon! This hackathon is held as a satellite event to the main symposium, and will take place in parallel to the symposium in De Krook, the new media centre of Ghent.

 

Goal and objectives

The goal of the soundscape hackathon is to generate awareness and create support for the design of urban soundscapes, and ultimately to foster the introduction of urban soundscape design in education and practice.

During the soundscape hackathon, teams of up to 4 people compete to redesign and improve the soundscape at selected urban open spaces worldwide. Teams are provided with high-quality immersive audiovisual recordings (360-degree video and spatial audio), collected within the framework of the Urban Soundscapes of the World project, in cities such as Berlin, Montreal, Hong Kong, Chicago or New York. Teams are required to develop software to alter the spatial audio recordings by adding or suppressing sounds originating from various directions, and subsequently to design a series of scenarios that present an improvement of the soundscape based on the original recordings.


An international jury will evaluate the designed sound environments and the way they are presented in VR to lay persons and professionals, and will award the winning team.

 

Planning

Teams will be given a detailed task description and all materials on Wednesday April 3 at 9 am, and they will have time to actively work on their project until Friday April 5 at noon. Participants of the soundscape hackathon are free to attend any of the lectures at the Urban Sound Symposium if they desire to do so.

On Friday April 5 in the afternoon, the teams will present their results to the jury and to any interested participants of the Urban Sound Symposium, during a demo session at De Krook.

Note that teams cannot claim ownership of their designs or of the supporting software.

Where will it take place?

The soundscape hackathon will take place in the brand new media centre of Ghent, called De Krook. This venue houses the library of Ghent, together with the media labs of Ghent University and imec. It is located within the city center of Ghent, only a 10-minute walk from Het Pand where the main symposium takes place. The media lab will provide one computer and one set of VR glasses for each team. Furthermore, the media lab is equiped with a state-of-the-art Iosono wave field synthesis system provided by Barco Audio Technologies (see pictures on the right), which can be used by the teams to test their acoustic designs. Technical staff will be available to support playback of spatial audio on this system.

 

Who can participate?

Teams of up to 4 people are invited to apply for the soundscape hackathon. We specifically target master students, PhD students and postdocs in acoustics, architecture, computer science, urban design or any related field, with an interest in soundscape design and virtual reality. The hackathon is open to people of all nationalities.

How to apply?

To apply for the soundscape hackathon, please send the following to hackathon@urban-sound-symposium.org before January 31, 2019:

  • The name of the team
  • The names of the members of the team (4 members maximum)
  • A short CV of each team member (1 page maximum per CV)
  • A joint motivation letter (1 page maximum)

A limited number of teams will be selected on the basis of their CV’s and motivation letter; selected teams will be announced in the course of February 2019, and will be provided with the detailed regulations of the hackathon in due time.

Participation to the hackathon is free of charge. Participants have to cover travel and accommodation expenses themselves, but several alternative accommodation options close to the hackathon venue will be proposed by the organizers.

Award

The winning team will receive an award in cash of 1.500 euro.


 


Sound Sensing in Smart Cities – Wednesday 16 October 2019


Future Cities Catapult, One Sekforde Street, London EC1R 0BE


This event, organised by the IOA Measurement and Instrumentation Group, will review the current state of acoustic instrumentation and measurement within ‘Smart Cities’. The event will look at recent developments in instrumentation for distributed and long term noise monitoring, the development of appropriate analytics for handling large datasets and example case studies including those where acoustic data is combined with other measurands. Presentations include:


A Little Electronic Milky Way of Sound – The IoT and the Future Sound of Cities, Dan Pope, Atkins Global

Standards for Smart Cities, Richard Barham, Acoustic Sensor Networks

Getting Smarter - Turning sound level monitors into Smart City tools, Paul McDonald, Sonitus Systems

Tools for data collection in Soundscape applications, Miguel Garcia Pedroche, HEAD Acoustics UK   

AI for Sound: A Future Technology for Smart Cities – Prof. Mark Plumbley, University of Surrey

Tranquil Cities, Grant Waters, Tranquil City

More measurement data – more knowledge or just more noise?, Chris Skinner, AECOM


Full details available on the Institute of Acoustics website:

https://www.ioa.org.uk/civicrm/event/info%3Fid%3D438%26reset%3D1


 


New book review online

 

ludic.dreaming. how to listen away from contemporary technoculture - The Occulture (David Cecchetto, Marc Couroux, Ted Hiebert, Eldritch Priest). New York: Bloomsbury, 2017.


Reviewed by Marcel Cobussen


 

 


Sonic Memory IMR Conference  5th September 2019 University of Liverpool 


The Sonic Memory conference will call upon researchers from all areas of music studies to share methodological approaches to and understandings of music, listening and memory, including those from sonic studies, music psychology, music ethnography, music therapy, popular music studies, and sociology. In doing so, the symposium has the following three aims:


· To bring together different ways of thinking about ‘sonic memory’ and develop collaboration between scholars from different areas of sonic studies.
· To deepen understanding of the relationship between music, listening and memory.
· To strengthen the contribution of Musicology to research and debate on topical and pressing issues.


The conference is free. The registration can be found at 

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/sonic-memory-conference-tickets-66545448227


 

CALL FOR PAPERS: SONIC MEMORY 

Institute for Musical Research, Conference 

5th September 2019, University of Liverpool


(Abstract Extended Deadline 20th July)


The idea that listening to sounds can trigger memory has captured the public’s imagination. Through the media, for example, music has been presented as a resource for autobiographical remembering, as in BBC Radio 4’s Desert Island Discs and the film documentary Alive Inside, which showed how listening to music can enable those living with dementia to access memories. The Sonic Memory day will call upon researchers from all areas of music studies to share methodological approaches to and understandings of music, listening and memory, including those from sonic studies, music psychology, music ethnography, music therapy, popular music studies, and sociology. In doing so, the symposium has the following three aims:


· To bring together different ways of thinking about ‘sonic memory’ and develop collaboration between scholars from different areas of music studies.


· To deepen understanding of the relationship between music, listening and memory.


· To strengthen the contribution of Musicology to research and debate on topical and pressing issues.


We would welcome abstracts for 20-minute papers from a wide range of approaches. For papers please submit a 300 word abstract by the 20th July 2019 to Jacqueline.Waldock@liverpool.ac.uk


Conference speakers include : Prof Ros Jennings and  Prof. Helmi Jarvliuoma.


The study day also provides an opportunity for PhD students to present a ‘three-minute thesis’, condensing their research into a three-minute presentation for an audience keen to discuss and engage with their work. For the 3 min thesis please submit: the thesis title and a short paragraph highlighting its’ relevance for the study day by 20th July 2019 to Jacqueline.Waldock@liverpool.ac.uk


 

New book review online

 

The Noisy Renaissance: Sound, Architecture, and Florentine Urban LifeNiall AtkinsonUniversity Park: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2016


Reviewed by Tiffany Ng


 

 

Aural Diversity Conferences


The first Aural Diversity Conference will take place on Saturday November 30th and Sunday December 1st 2019 at De Montfort University, Leicester and at the Attenborough Arts Centre, University of Leicester.


It will coincide with the International Day of Persons with Disabilities at University of Leicester. It will be a ‘relaxed’ event, designed to be accessible to all.


The conference theme is the consequences of aural diversity for sound and music. The conference will comprise academic papers and musical performances that conform to the Aural Diversity conventions.


Keynote Papers:


·      Prof John Levack Drever - Phonating Hand Dryers: exploits in aural diverse composition and co-composition.

·      Dr Alinka Greasley - Exploring the music listening behaviour of people with hearing impairments: patient and practitioner perspectives.

·      Prof Andrew Hugill - Consequences of Ménière’s Disease and other forms of hearing impairment for musicians, their music-making, hearing care and technologies.

·      Prof Peter Rea - Aural Diversity: the consequences of pathology and treatment. A surgeon’s perspective.

 

Call for papers

The full extent of the differences in hearing between individuals is slowly being recognised. It is a fact of life that all people are affected by age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) which begins in their mid-20s. But hearing can also change in other ways during a typical lifetime. Millions of people have hearing loss caused by various conditions such as diseases and disorders, traumas and shocks. And hearing changes do not always involve loss: in some cases hearing can become more acute. Yet the sound and music industries assumes that everybody has the ears of a healthy 18 year old (BS ISO 226:2003).


The conference will consider such questions as:


o   What adjustments should be made to accommodate diversity in hearing?

o   How does aural diversity transform listening?

o   How can audiology and hearing aid design take better account of aural diversity?

o   What new technologies can be made to accommodate different hearing types?

o   What are the consequences for composers of aural diversity?

o   How is musical performance affected by changes in hearing?

o   How may sound studies accommodate aural diversity?


This is not an exhaustive list and other related topics are also welcome.


We invite proposals for either or both of the following:


o   Academic papers (20 minutes, plus 10 minutes for questions)

o   Musical performances and/or artistic statements (10 minutes)


Please submit proposals by July 2nd 2019 using the Abstract Template to andrew.hugill@leicester.ac.uk

 


The conference will be interdisciplinary, and contributions are invited from music, sound studies, audiology, hearing aid design/manufacture, and other fields that relate to this area. Academic papers will be eligible for inclusion in a subsequent peer-reviewed book publication. There will be a registration fee of £25 (£10 for students, senior citizens, disabled and registered unemployed people).


 

 

 

Open Call: Artist Residency Programme 


The Spatial Sound Institute invites artists, researchers and technical developers from a variety of disciplines to apply for the Artist Residency Programme at the Spatial Sound Institute in Budapest, Hungary. They currently accept submissions for residencies to take place in the period 1st of January - 31st of December 2020.


The Spatial Sound Institute welcomes applications by professionals from various disciplines that consider creation and investigation of sound vital to their personal development and professional practice. 

The programme seeks to engage projects that contribute to the following key areas of study:


·      Sonic Architecture

·      Physiology and Psychology of Listening

·      Spatial Memetics

·      Human Space Interaction Design


Closing date for applications: June 30th 2019 23:59PM CET.


Read more about the call for proposals here.


The institute also encourages you to explore the brand new website of the Spatial Sound Institute , our centre for the research and development in Budapest, Hungary.


Since its opening in 2015, the Spatial Sound Institute has been experimenting with new sound technologies and methodologies to improve our understanding of and interaction with sonic environments and their complex impact on us human beings. 


The website brings together an extensive archive of works created in 4DSOUND over the past decade, with projects and publications from over a hundred contributors in the fields of music, technology, architecture and media arts.

 



JSS Call for Papers: Sound Studies, Soundscapes, and Sound Art of Latin America [UPDATED]


Music, radio, and TV broadcasts; blaring loudspeakers, public announcements, street vendors; city sounds, sounds of progress, sounds of revolution, or sounds of change; sounds deliberately produced or emerging unintentionally, serving a disciplinary function or expressing forms of freedom; musical as well as non-musical (functional) sounds; overwhelming natural sounds of rain forests, the pampas, and highlands.


Latin America is filled with sounds; indeed, its cities might count among the noisiest of the world, in notable contrast with the (relative) quietness of its rural areas and wild nature. Is it possible to identify specific Latin American soundscapes? How can they be characterized? What can be heard there? How should we listen to them, experience them, affect and be affected by them? What is their political, social, religious, ethical, economic, aesthetic influence or meaning?


The Journal of Sonic Studies is searching for scholarly and artistic contributions that deal with the connections and relationships between Latin American history, culture, society, and politics and the production, distribution, and reception of sounds, noises, and silence. The broader aim of this special issue is to establish “sound” as an analytical category that provides us with challenging perspectives on and a new understanding of Latin America. Therefore, our call does not focus on a particular historical period or research methodology, but seeks to bring together scholars and artist-researchers who share an interest in Latin American soundscapes.


Themes for submission may include but are not limited to:

-       The sonic identity of any Latin American space

-       Differences between American/European and Latin American soundscapes

-       Latin American (contemporary) sound art

-       The role, position, and function of music in contemporary Latin American societies

-       Sonic histories of Latin America

-       Listening cultures of Latin America 

-       Politics of sounds or the sounds of politics in Latin America

-       The role of silence in Latin American societies and/or discourses

-       The role of sounds in Latin American religious practices

-       Rural “versus” urban soundscapes


Deadline

Potential contributors are invited to submit completed essays by September 1, 2019.

For more information, or to submit an essay, please contact noise@sonicstudies.org

 

Guest editors

The Colombian philosopher and sound artist Miguel Isaza and the Brazilian researcher and sound artist Pedro Oliveira will act as guest editors of this special issue. 


 

Conference: Regenerative Feedback - May 24-26, 2019, WORM – Rotterdam, UBIK Space, Boomgaardsstraat 71

 

Regenerative Feedback is an annual music, new media, sound art and philosophy conference. The idea behind this event is to present experimental performances; new media art, and to explore these through workshops, accessible lectures and conversations between experts and audiences.


The first iteration of Regenerative Feedback took place at Issue Project Room, New York City in 2018, with speakers such as Reza Negarestani, Alexandra Hedako Mason, Manni Dee, Colin Self, Melle Kromhout and Marielle Pelissero. This edition at WORM will be followed up by an event in Mexico City in 2020.


The event aims to investigate interdisciplinary methods to generate sustainable social futures through the lens of music and new media, and hopes to motivate spectators in new emancipatory directions: if we can understand what it is that attracts us to music, what drives us, in fact, to listen closely to one another; then there’s a chance for this vision to be innovatively applied in other areas.


Regenerative Feedback is thus both media conference and intellectual gathering, and tries to build bridges between the two, with room for extensive Q&A sessions to promote active spectatorship.


First names: Marie Thompson, Mattin, N-Prolenta, Céline Manz + Guest, Inigo Wilkins, Dreamcrusher, Cecile Malaspina, Adam Harper, DeForrest Brown Jr.


More information


 

 

Audio Mostly 2019: A Journey in Sound - 18th to 20th September 2019 | Call for Papers



As an interdisciplinary audio conference, Audio Mostly would like to welcome paper submissions from anyone interested in audio design, interaction and technology. The special theme for the conference this year is ‘A Journey in Sound’ and we would particularly encourage papers relating to this theme for at the conference this year. We often have different experiences of sound and music though out our lives, there are sounds that remind us of different places and people. We also have different playlists and songs that take us back and remind us of certain times and events. Throughout our lives we are interacting with sounds and music, we are on a journey in sound. This year the theme of the conference is open to interpretation, but people might think about the following, in relation to the theme:

 

·      Sonic aspects of digital stories, documentaries and archives

·      The soundtrack to our lives. Archiving and sharing sound 

·      The emotional potential of a sound, how might this be used to support interaction

·      The different uses of sound and music across different settings

·      The re-use of recollections and memories by composers and sound designers

·      The development of musical tools that can let us express our experiences over time 

·      Socio-technical uses of AI create highly personalised soundtracks that respond to one’s context

·      Adaptive sound and music use in journeys, time and the creative use of data

 

Audio Mostly 2019 encourages the submission of papers (oral/poster presentation) addressing such questions and others related to the conference theme and the topics presented below.

 

LIST OF TOPICS

The Audio Mostly conference series is interested in sound Interaction Design & Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) in general. The conference provides a space to reflect on the role of sound/music in our lives and how to understand, develop and design systems which relate to sound and music – we are particularly interested in this from a broad HCI perspective. We encourage original papers (oral/poster presentation) addressing the conference theme or other topics from the list provided below. We welcome multidisciplinary approaches involving fields such as music informatics, information and communication technologies, sound design, music performance, visualisation, composition, perception/cognition and aesthetics.

 

·      Accessibility

·      Aesthetics

·      Affective computing applied to sound/music

·      AI, HCI and Music

·      Acoustics and Psychoacoustics

·      Auditory display and sonification

·      Augmented and virtual reality with or for sound and music

·      Computational musicology

·      Critical approaches to interaction, design and sound

·      Digital augmentation (e.g. musical instruments, stage, studio, audiences, performers, objects)

·      Digital music libraries

·      Ethnographic studies

·      Game audio and music

·      Gestural interaction with sound or music

·      Immersive and spatial audio

·      Interactive sonic arts and artworks

·      Intelligent music tutoring systems

·      Interfaces for audio engineering and post-production

·      Interfaces or synthesis models for sound design

·      Live performing arts

·      Music information retrieval & Interaction

·      Musical Human-Computer Interaction

·      New methods for the evaluation of user experiences of sound and music

·      Participatory and co-design methodologies with or for audio

·      Philosophical or sociological reflections on Audio Mostly related topics

·      Psychology, cognition, perception

·      Semantic web music technologies

·      Spatial audio, interaction design and ambisonics

·      Sonic interaction design

·      Sound and image interaction: from production to perception

·      Sound and soundscape studies

 

SUBMISSION INFORMATION

Paper submissions can be presented in the two following formats:

 

·      Short papers (4 pages) should present a work-in-progress.

·      Long papers (5-8 pages) should present a substantial contribution to the field.

 

Please see the Authors’ instructions & submission section of the website for submission templates and further information on the submission process.

 

Submission Site

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=am2019

 

Guidance

Audio Mostly 2019 papers can be of the following nature:

 

·      Original research papers, which report original research methods and results.

·      Review papers, which typically summarise the current state-of-the-art on a topic.

·      Position papers, which typically present opinions about specific issues.

·      Case study papers, which typically present practical situations in real-world contexts that can contribute to existing knowledge of the field.

 

Upon paper submission, authors will have the possibility to give their preferences for oral or poster presentations. The final mode of presentation (oral/poster) will be based on the review process and program constraints, and will be communicated to the authors upon acceptance.

 

Review and Selection Process

Papers will be subject to single blind peer-review by at least two reviewers and included in the conference proceedings.

We encourage authors of papers to also consider their work for the Demo track, wherever relevant (see Call for Demos and guidelines below).

Audio Mostly 2019 proceedings will be published by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) (to be confirmed) and made available through their digital library.

 

Dates 
Submission Deadline: 24
th May 2019

Acceptance: 14th July 2019

Camera Ready: 9th August 2019

 

Registration

Audio Mostly requires that at least one author of each accepted paper must be registered to the conference to give the oral or poster presentation.

 

Contact

 

For more information or questions, please contact the Paper and Poster Chairs: Adrian Hazzard – adrian.hazzard@nottingham.ac.uk or Elizabeth Kelly – elizabeth.kelly@nottingham.ac.uk


 



JSS Call for Papers: Soundscapes of Latin America


Music, radio, and TV broadcasts; blaring loudspeakers, public announcements, street vendors; city sounds, sounds of progress, sounds of revolution, or sounds of change; sounds deliberately produced or emerging unintentionally, serving a disciplinary function or expressing forms of freedom; musical as well as non-musical (functional) sounds; overwhelming natural sounds of rain forests, the pampas, and highlands.

 

Latin America is filled with sounds; indeed, its cities might count among the noisiest of the world, in notable contrast with the (relative) quietness of its rural areas and wild nature. Is it possible to identify specific Latin American soundscapes? How can they be characterized? What can be heard there? How should we listen to them, experience them, affect and be affected by them? What is their political, social, religious, ethical, economic, aesthetic influence or meaning?

 

The Journal of Sonic Studies is searching for scholarly and artistic contributions that deal with the connections and relationships between Latin American history, culture, society, and politics and the production, distribution, and reception of sounds, noises, and silence. The broader aim of this special issue is to establish “sound” as an analytical category that provides us with challenging perspectives on and a new understanding of Latin America. Therefore, our call does not focus on a particular historical period or research methodology, but seeks to bring together scholars and artist-researchers who share an interest in Latin American soundscapes.

 

Themes for submission may include but are not limited to:

-       The sonic identity of any Latin American space

-       Differences between Western and Latin American soundscapes

-       Latin American (contemporary) sound art

-       The role, position, and function of music in contemporary Latin American societies

-       Sonic histories of Latin America

-       Listening cultures of Latin America 

-       Politics of sounds or the sounds of politics in Latin America

-       The role of silence in Latin American societies and/or discourses

The role of sounds in Latin American religious practices

-       Rural “versus” urban soundscapes

 

Deadline

Potential contributors are invited to submit completed essays by September 1, 2019.

For more information, or to submit an essay, please contact noise@sonicstudies.org

 

 

TheJournal of Sonic Studiesis a peer-reviewed, online, open access journal providing a platform for theorists and artist-researchers who would like to present relevant work regarding auditory cultures, to further our collective understanding of the impact and importance of sound for our cultures. The editors welcome scholarly as well as artistic research and also expect all contributions to have a firm theoretical grounding. Priority is given to contributions that explicitly use the Internet as a medium, e.g. by inserting A/V materials, hyperlinks, and the use of non-conventional structures. JSS invites potential contributors to use the Research Catalogue as the platform in which the submission is presented (see http://www.researchcatalogue.net/). Other submission guidelines can be found at sonicstudies.org/guidelines.


 


ICA 2019 – Call for Papers


The German Acoustical Society (DEGA) is pleased to invite you to the 23rd International Congress on Acoustics - ICA 2019 - in the beautiful and historical city of Aachen. The ICA 2019 takes place from 9 to 13 September 2019. It will also include the 4th EAA Euroregio conference. 

Registration and submission of abstracts is now officially open. You are
 welcome to join the global community of acousticians at ICA and submit your abstract until 1 February. 

*Official Call for Papers:
 www.ica2019.org/authors/call-for-papers * 
*Conference Website and registration:
 www.ica2019.org * 

We are looking forward to seeing you in Aachen next summer.
 

With our very best regards,
 

ICA 2019 organizing team
 

Michael Vorländer (Congress Chair)
 
Janina Fels (Congress Vice-Chair)
 
Martin Ochmann (Program Chair)
 



 


Conference Announcement: Acoustics of Empire ( December 7-8, 2018, University of Cambridge)

The long 19th century was a period of dramatic political, scientific and technological change. Both sound studies and global/postcolonial studies have focused on this period, but have largely done so independently of one another. This conference raises questions of how sound and sound technologies were bound up in colonial and imperial practices, and how that global political context simultaneously shaped the science and practice of hearing and thinking about sound. In short, how might we imagine a global history of 19th-century acoustics and aurality?

More details here, including the full conference programme

Register for conference here (£30 waged/£10 unwaged; Cambridge students free)

 

Participants:

Peter McMurray, co-organizer (University of Cambridge)

Priyasha Mukhopadhyay, co-organizer (Yale University)

Elleke Boehmer (University of Oxford)

Alejandra Bronfman (SUNY Albany)

Hyung Kyong Hannah Chang (Sungkonghoe University)

Nicholas Cook (University of Cambridge)

James Davies (UC Berkeley)

Ziad Fahmy (Cornell University)

Alexandra Hui (Mississippi State University)

Nazan Maksudyan (Humboldt Universitaet Berlin)

Jairo Moreno (University of Pennsylvania)

Anindita Nag (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science)

Rumya Putcha (Texas A&M University)

Sindumathi Revuluri (Harvard University)

Gavin Steingo (Princeton University)

David Trippett (University of Cambridge)

Richard Williams (SOAS University of London)

 

Part of the ERC-funded project Sound and Materialism in the 19th Century. 

 

Questions? Contact erc-sound@mus.cam.ac.uk



 


New podcasts online

Podcast Thirteen is online, which features artist Tim Shaw. This is the final podcast of The Dominant Eye series. In addition, the closing panel discussion of the “The Ecology of Sound” symposium can be auditioned on the Podcast page. The podcasts can be found here, or go directly to Podcast Thirteen by following this link, or to the closing panel discussion via this link.