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Definition of haptics


Haptic is usually referred to as the sense of touch. Touch involves experiences of texture, temperature and vibration, perceived by the nervous system through the skin.

As soon as touch includes intentional muscle movement, such as grasping a 3-D volume and sensing its weight, proportions, density & shape, we transcend touch and tactility

and enter haptics. 

Welcome to the HAPTICA  EXPOSITION

This expositions gives an overview of the artistic research project entitled HAPTICA that was conducted in collaboration between professionals and researcher in design, culinary arts, and hospitality. In January 2019 the HAPTICA project was spatial staged in two adjoining studios at Konstfack:

 

  • dark studio - haptic attributes - performative experience 
  • light studio - haptic projects - labs and processes 


These two dark and light spaces set the stage for sharing and evaluating the process as well as framing the way we structured the multimedia documentation after the exhibition over. The exhibtion works as an artistic way to inform all the HAPTICA partners of each others contribution to the project. It was also a way to open up the project so the educational and funding agency could gain an overview of the project for evaluation. It was mainly curated for guiding groups through the studios.  We invited nine guests for each session, starting with a short presentation (15 min) of the background/history of HAPTICA that gives an introduction to the theoretical illustrated models of haptic attributes of: HAND, NOSE /MOUTH & BODY aswell as the Aesthetic laboration A-Lab method. Finally, a short description was given for navigating through the two studios.


DARK STUDIO


Upon entering the dark studio everyone was guided to a circle of chairs and asked to sit down and close their eyes. Once settled, the voice of Annika Göran Rodell guided the participants to explore the haptic attributes of the body starting with the substance fo the chair and how the weight of your body felt upon the seat and back of the chair. Then we progressed through the attributes to airflow and breathing and ended in the proportions of the body. After this collective experience, the group was divided into 3 groups and each group was asked to follow a leader to one of the three stages.  


On each stage three participants were guided through a fundamental experience of haptic attributes of the: sculpting hand, sensitized nose/mouth and meditative balanced body. The black studio was   These haptic attributes exemplified our major finding and theoretical structure.  The spatial dimensions of the studio were ambiguous and we gave minimal verbal input so as to enhance the need to rely on haptic perception and communicating knowledge through embodied action.  



HAPTIC of Hand and Mouth  

 

These two videos where created to show how two aesthetic disciplines: a professional taster and sculptor can explore sensuous haptic qualities of two malleable materials; snow and clay.


Exploring snow - Mischa Billing 




Exploring clay - Cheryl Akner Koler 

Fusion of the Senses


The Fusion of our senses - model places movement in the center because movement plays a central role in fusing our senses together. At the top of the model is tactile and haptics followed in a clockwise order to audio, smell, taste and visual.

This model was inspired, in part, by philosopher Alexander Baumgarten´s definition of aesthetics: as the science of sensuous cognition (from 1735). He explained the concept sensuous as the fusion of all our senses and cognition as our ability to know. According to Richard Shustermanb(2000, 264 [1992]), Baumgarten recognized the importance of aesthetic reasoning to “promote greater knowledge” during scientific studies. Baumgarten understood the value of developing sensory skills that improved an individual’s ability to discern relationships between features, and to develop improvisation and imaginative capacity. He suggested that aesthetic reasoning could offer ways to go beyond the established norms of order that scientists often rely on. He also proposed that aesthetic experience prepares individuals to deal with relative values as a useful way of reasoning when one deals with new territories that challenge conventions (Shusterman 2000, 263–7 [1992]).


Read More > Pdf. 

 

 

 

1

Beyond Good

Leaders: Mischa Billing, Thomas Drejing & Cheryl Akner Koler  

 

This pedagogic research explores the aesthetic gestalt process from an academic perspective and a professional context that interlaces experience from sculpture, industrial design, and performative arts as well as from the culinary arts and the hospitality industry. The study concerns an introductory course for sommeliers, chefs, and hotel professionals, regarding a co-creative aesthetic gestalt process applied to table setting for different style periods. A visualization model outlines theoretical and applied aspects of aesthetics. The course includes: a research phase, two haptic sensitizing labs, two table setting/Bricoleur labs and a performative examination. An aesthetic taxonomy is specifically adapted to the three different professions and a unique Percent Progression Method was developed to structure the gestalt process. We describe how we achieved a balance between a structured pedagogic framework and improvisational actions to support the learning outcomes of the course.


Read More > Pdf. 

 

9

Table setting 

Lab leaders:  Annika Göran Rodell, Lars Eriksson & Cheryl Akner Koler 

The light studio had large windows along one side that brought in the daylight. The studio exposed 9 different projects presenting the physical artifacts and theoretical models on 9 separate tables. Video monitors were mounted on most of the tables showing short videos that captured a major activity and energy in the project. All of the projects where about haptic experiences that priorities materials and a making/ formgiving process from the activities in the projects and folder on each table showed the haptic attributes of the hand, nose/ mouth and or body, as well as the relevance, contributions and dissemination channels of the project. 


 

During the guided tours this studio gave the visitors a chance to meet with members of the HAPTICA project and learn about the intentions of each project displayed on the tables. The feedback we received from the visitors was valuable for the documentation phase after the exhibition was taken down. These conversations in the studios have helped gain insight into our findings as well as unfold a broad discussion about the project as well as the documentation method of creating an exhibition that gives structure for this exposition.  )



The dark studio was draped in black theater currents with very low ambient light to reduce visual stimulation and heighten haptic experiences. In this dark space were three spatial stages:


             1.   HAND

             2.   NOSE /MOUTH

             3.   BODY 

________________________________________________________

The first event was done collectively, then the group was divided into 3 groups with 3 participants in each group and was guided to take part in performative acts at each of the 3 stages. 


Upon entering the dark studio everyone was guided to a circle of chairs and asked to sit down and close their eyes. Once settled, a voice guided the participants to explore the haptic attributes of the body starting with substance and weight progressing to airflow and breathing and ending in proportion. After this collective experience, the group was divided into 3 groups and each group was asked to follow a leader to one of the three stages.  


On each stage three participants were guided through a fundamental experience of haptic attributes of the: sculpting hand, sensitized nose/mouth and meditative balanced body. The black studio was   These haptic attributes exemplified our major finding and theoretical structure.  The spatial dimensions of the studio were ambiguous and we gave minimal verbal input so as to enhance the need to rely on haptic perception and communicating knowledge through embodied action.  


Read More > Pdf.


     METHODS

LIGHT STUDIO

The intentions of the A-Lab leaders were to heighten awareness of uncensored emotional reactions triggered by experiencing unproven combinations of wine and food through four concepts combining taste expert- and sculpting experiences. The four concepts were:

i) Apply the “Taster’s Haptic Grip”-model in the A-Lab (see Methods),

ii) Challenging the idea of a “good taste” experience,

iii) Exploring how climate change can affect haptic structure and taste of wine/food and

iv) Sculpting immediate felt haptic and emotional experiences


MORE > read pdf. 

Main

METHODS

Our intention in this project 8. Crafting sense with Fly-tying was to further develop and adapt an original Aesthetic Laboration (A-Lab) using fly-tying crafting method by Cristine Sundbom and Cheryl Akner Koler.  In the present A-lab we were invited to set up a “box” in the Gather Festival to test the fly-tying A-Lab as a way to support the audience at the Gathering festival to develop a deep dialogue concerning the  theme and message presented by the chosen keynote speaker Lucy McRae. McRae´s presentation showed her artistic work based on how she explored the affects future technology could have on her human body (link). The A-lab aimed to support the participants’ in their own embodied experiences of the performative keynote by engaging their sensitivities in a creative hand crafting process.


Read more -Pdf.


 

2

Developing an A-Lab

8

© Cheryl Akner Koler 

Professional Collaboration  &  Spit 

Authors: Mischa Billing & Peter Jönsson  / Mischa Billing

Crafting sense with fly-tying 

METHODS

Professionellt sammarbete

 

 

 

Spott 

   2 AUDIO files

    Mischa Billing 

(Swedish)

       METHODS

The intentions with this project was to create a collaboration between the professional taster Mischa Billing and the portrait photographer Peter Jönsson to explore ways to put focus on haptic mouth experience. There is little known about the embodied experience of being an expert taster and even less about the inner experience of the mouth. The idea was to capture a number of artistic portrait of what an expert taster experiences to help raise the level of awareness about both professions.

 

 “Because the oral tissues have a strong somatosensory innervation, they are the locus of some of our most intense and vivid bodily experiences.” 

             Patrick Haggar & Lieki de Boer

 


Tasters Haptic Grip 

© Mischa Billing & Cheryl Akner Koler 

Gestalt 

Mindfulness 

 



Haptic Embodiment 

 



Emotions 

 

 


Professionalism 

This Co-creative writing method highlights the subjective and qualitative aspects of design research and focuses on aesthetic methods that make design unique. Its’ purpose is to strengthen the importance and use of our immediately felt experiences in design research. Through this method the haptic and emotional content of an expressive moment within a lab session is presented in short videos (1-2 minutes long). By working in small groups of 2-3 participants we share insights of ongoing work from each participants' research and engage each other in a structured method that respects each individual’s own aesthetic experiences. The method offers time to share research through the videos, to formulate direct and immediately felt questions and it encourages the participants to actively listen to articulated answers. It also gave individual time for reflection, articulation and documentation of our subjectively felt experiences.  To summarize a collective performative act is given to the group designed to share the entire experience that merged the short video with an oral performance.


Read more >  Pdf. 

7

Main METHODS

Co-creation writing process for short videos


Lab leaders: Cheryl Akner Koler, Elsa Kosmack Vaara, Nina Björnsatd & Annika Göran Rodell 

3

Authors: Corina Akner & Cheryl Akner Koler  

Food as Material


Social Body Practice

       METHODS

The intention for this project was to develop a new A-Lab and generate a new model for learning about, and integrating haptic attributes in meal creation in order to inspire long term sustainable innovation. The new A-Lab; Singular haptic interaction was developed to enhance haptic sensitivity about raw organic materials. The food material used in this lab was a single blue berry. The new method; Sequential material transformation: too wet - too dry  illustrates a how materials change through a sequence of different operations starting in the center by slicing a raw material (case - sliced tomato) and transforming through heat and grinding processes in one direction and cutting and mixing processes in the other. 


               Read More > Pdf. 

 

The scientific paper: Integrating Sensitizing Labs in an Educational Design Process for Haptic Interaction, was written and published in 2016. It summarizes collaborative research on developing technical aids for persons with deafblindness (DB) using haptic technology. The paper explains ways to educate designers so they are able to  adapt the attributes of haptic interaction to fit the embodied experience of the users. This paper presents educationally framed aesthetic sensitizing labs: 1) a material-lab exploring the tactile and haptic structures of materials, 2) a vibrotactile-lab exploring actuators directly on the body and 3) a combined lab with vibrotactile-actuators embedded in materials. These labs were integrated in a design course that supports a creative design process for embodied explorative and experimental activities that feed into an emerging gestalt. A co-design process was developed in collaboration with researchers and users who developed navigation and communication systems for people with deafblindness. Conclusion: the labs helped to discern attributes of haptic interactions which supported designing scenarios and prototypes showing novel ways to understand and shape haptic interaction.


Read More > Pdf.

6

Vibrotactil interaction 


Lab leaders:  Cheryl Akner Koler & Parivash Ranjabar 

Main

METHODS

4

Back to the Land 2.0

Authors & Leaders: Annika Göran Rodell & Cheryl Akner Koler  

5

      METHODS

Pillow Design 

The intention of this new course module was to integrate aesthetic and design methods in a foundation course at Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary arts and Meal Science. The innovative idea with this module was for the students to work with non-food materials in a sensory science context as well as combine sensory science labs with aesthetic labs in an applied design project about pillows.   

 

A central part of the original course was for students experience sensory science labs to discern the taste of various food and drink items. By introducing a non-food material the lab shifted to haptic attributes, in this case pillows, where the hands and body were engaged.


Read More > Pdf. 

 

This international course was developed through the support of HAPTICA to create a platofrm to study local and global food system in relation to creating collective meal expereinces.  The course introduce an approach to design for sustainable development that addressed a live issue regarding the growth and distribution of food. We investigate ways to enhance food culture and security by developing local food systems that connect aesthetic, social, ecological and economic factors. 


Read More > Pdf. 

 

      METHODS