The Research Catalogue (RC) is a non-commercial, collaboration and publishing platform for artistic research provided by the Society for Artistic Research. The RC is free to use for artists and researchers. It serves also as a backbone for teaching purposes, student assessment, peer review workflows and research funding administration. It strives to be an open space for experimentation and exchange.

recent activities >

CCFT Buffer Fringe 2020 (2020) Johan Sandborg, Linda H. Lien, Duncan Higgins, Shauna McMullan, Susan Brind, Jim Harold, Yiorgos Hadjichristou, Ana Souto Galvan, andy d lock
Creative Centre for Fluid Territories (CCFT), is a peripatetic international research group that contributes to discussions about interdisciplinary practices and how they articulate critical insights about place making, belonging and occupation. Building on last year’s contribution to buffer fringe 2019 - ‘The Urban Glenti’ - CCFT proposes to create a unique dialogical and negotiated creative exchange to take place on-line within a dedicated exposition: Images, sounds, texts, interviews, moving image are going to be used to contest the idea of fixed documentation in order to acknowledge how our relationship to places are not static and where conflict/tension/uncertainty also defines the creative process itself. CCFT’s work methodology builds on an established mutual respect; track record and insight, rooted in a continued collaborative relationship that has emerged through trust and dialogue. Our focus is on practice-based research methods exploiting the creative intersection between image and text, presented as performance, publication, installation, architectural work, design intervention, music works and spatial practice. In the intersection of these formulations, we seek to explore the expanded concept of “the atlas” as a dissemination strategy. ATLAS – the order of memory - simultaneously linear and cyclic, ordered and labyrinthine, open to infinite interpretation and analysis — a form of mnemonic iteration – physical and virtual.
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Almat 2020 - symposium on algorithmic agency in artistic practice (2020) Hanns Holger Rutz, David Pirrò, Daniele Pozzi
The ALMAT 2020 Symposium is interested in the genealogical, processual aspects of algorithms and their transformative potential. We seek critical approaches that avoid both mystification and commodification, that aim at opening the black box of "wonder" that is often presented to the public when utilising algorithms. We depart from the assumption that algorithms possess an inherent material agency that emerges from the intra-action between human and machine (K. Barad). In these exchange processes, we experience gaps, breaks and bends in the flow, the reconfigurative nature of the algorithmic which bounces back and reconfigures our thinking and approach to artistic work. When algorithms are inserted in the creative process, they actively shape this process and spread outside the boundaries of a particular medium or artefact. The symposium looks to rethink the relation between humans and algorithms (N.K. Hayles) in terms of an organic or ecological perspective (Y. Hui) in which actors are entangled and co-generative. The foundation for the symposium is given by the eponymous artistic research project ALMAT - Algorithms that Matter, funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF AR 403-GBL) and hosted at the Institute of Electronic Music and Acoustics (IEM) at the University of Music and Performing Arts Graz. ALMAT 2020 was originally planned to take place (06–07 July) adjoining the 8th Conference on Computation, Communication, Aesthetics & X – xCoAx (08–10 July). xCoAx is an exploration of the intersection where computational tools and media meet art and culture, in the form of a multi-disciplinary enquiry on aesthetics, computation, communication and the elusive X factor that connects them all. Due to the Coronavirus crisis, xCoAx is going into an online-only mode, and the ALMAT symposium has been replaced by an online assemblage of the submitted proposals only.
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PENGERKATU 7 TYÖHUONE (2020) vincent roumagnac, Simo Kellokumpu
PENGERKATU 7 TYÖHUONE RESEARCH PROJECT PAGE
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recent publications >

Charon as Muse - The Ferrying of Voices in Evan Parker’s Solo Saxophone Music to the Double-Bass as Creative Authorship (2020) Tom Blancarte, Niclas Hundahl
The transmission and communication of musical concepts and the ways in which they influence or interact with creativity are central to the ontology of music, but this aspect is rarely tackled head-on by musicians themselves. In language, the typical realm of semiotics and semantics, translation theory serves as an interesting and rich field for investigations into the nature of meaning and communication of meanings. In my research, I propose that the application of various translation theories to the field of music opens up new ways of exploring the “meanings” of music, as well as new methodologies for creating musical novelties. To demonstrate this theory in practice, I have chosen to develop and apply translation theories to Evan Parker’s solo soprano saxophone music and translate this music to my own solo double-bass playing, creating new and original solo music on the double-bass.
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Half Hidden (2020) Anne Haaning
This exposition conveys the final results of Anne Haaning's artistic research project Half Hidden, which she has been conducting as a PhD Candidate with Oslo National Academy of the Arts in collaboration with the Academy of Arts, UiT The Arctic University of Norway and the Norwegian Artistic Research Programme. ​ Through the prism of the mineral cryolite, extracted from Greenland by Denmark in the years 1857–1985, the project seeks to uncover hidden structures and histories imbedded in technology. It has done so by exploring analogical correspondences at a specific intersection of technology, myth and colonialism; the method it employs to this end is an investigation of the ontological context of digital image production. Denmark extracted the rare mineral cryolite in Greenland between the mid nineteenth and the late twentieth centuries. Essential to the mass production of aluminium, cryolite proved critical for the shipbuilding and aviation industries during World Wars I and II. The mineral was so important that the cryolite mine was put under US administration during the German occupation of Denmark in World War II. But this history has been virtually erased from the collective memory and consciousness of the Danes. Today, the flooded mine is a scar in the Greenlandic landscape covered by a pervasive mirroring water plane concealing a significant part of the Danish-Greenlandic colonial history.
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Not Even the Dead Will Survive (2020) Adria Julia
The Pinacoteca de São Paulo museum, managed by the State of São Paulo Culture and Creative Economy Department, presents from October 26, 2019, to February 16, 2020, the show Adrià Julià: Nem mesmo os mortos sobreviverão [Not Even the Dead Will Survive] — the first solo exhibition of the artist, born in Barcelona in 1974, to be held in Brazil. The show is curated by Fernanda Pitta, the museum’s curator, and artworks will be displayed on the courtyard and in two rooms adjoining the long-term exhibition of Pinacoteca’s collection, on the second floor of the museum building. The works call into question the implications of the techniques of replication, printing and authentication that directed the flow of images in the early days of photography.
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