The Research Catalogue (RC) is a non-commercial, collaboration and publishing platform for artistic research provided by the Society for Artistic Research. The RC is free to use for artists and researchers. It serves also as a backbone for teaching purposes, student assessment, peer review workflows and research funding administration. It strives to be an open space for experimentation and exchange.

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Picasso(s):Interactions (2020) Michael Joseph Fletcher
This project investigates new ways of preparing music for contemporary jazz improvisers by interrogating the question: Can constraints on jazz practice produce original creative outcomes?
open exposition
On Klänge - Space, Time and Body (2020) Erika Matsunami
The start point of this artistic research is an artwork Corona-STEMS-GALAXYOMEGA (May 2020) by Lukas Huisman who a pianist and Ph.D. in performing arts/piano in classic-modern music, he started to embodiment "Corona" (1962) by Takemitsu together with a composer Patrick Housen newly. I collaborate with Housen as a visual artist for a sound installation in this artistic project. Thereby the forthcoming Joint artistic research "variations" which relates to this artistic research on Klänge - Space, Time and Body, I as a visual artist, explore the subject of time and space in "Corona" (1962) for pianist(s) by Toru Takemitsu for the exploration of new interpretations. My practical contribution performance in the site-specific installation for variation I is "Corona" without Pianist for 4 ch discrete sound installation in 2020 is an invisible sense such as literary musical expression in "who is left to drift in the loneliness of the remaining scent." Thus theoretical exploration is in terms of ongoing artistic research in the philosophy of sound. The aim of this artistic research is a new multi-layered open score "Variation I, II and III".
open exposition
Expositionality in Action (2020) Michael Schwab
Although it is virtually impossible to formalize what ‘best practice’ on the Research Catalogue might be, it harbours by now numerous examples of expositions that ‘work.’ In this session, I want to introduce a small set of diverse expositions from JAR as a way to highlight successful choices people have taken. With a short explanation of expositionality and virtual witnessing, I aim to support an understanding of the effect that those examples have as a way of describing how media-rich articulations can productively engage with both academic and artistic expectations.
open exposition

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Half Hidden (2020) Anne Haaning
This exposition conveys the final results of Anne Haaning's artistic research project Half Hidden, which she has been conducting as a PhD Candidate with Oslo National Academy of the Arts in collaboration with the Academy of Arts, UiT The Arctic University of Norway and the Norwegian Artistic Research Programme. ​ Through the prism of the mineral cryolite, extracted from Greenland by Denmark in the years 1857–1985, the project seeks to uncover hidden structures and histories imbedded in technology. It has done so by exploring analogical correspondences at a specific intersection of technology, myth and colonialism; the method it employs to this end is an investigation of the ontological context of digital image production. Denmark extracted the rare mineral cryolite in Greenland between the mid nineteenth and the late twentieth centuries. Essential to the mass production of aluminium, cryolite proved critical for the shipbuilding and aviation industries during World Wars I and II. The mineral was so important that the cryolite mine was put under US administration during the German occupation of Denmark in World War II. But this history has been virtually erased from the collective memory and consciousness of the Danes. Today, the flooded mine is a scar in the Greenlandic landscape covered by a pervasive mirroring water plane concealing a significant part of the Danish-Greenlandic colonial history.
open exposition
Not Even the Dead Will Survive (2020) Adria Julia
The Pinacoteca de São Paulo museum, managed by the State of São Paulo Culture and Creative Economy Department, presents from October 26, 2019, to February 16, 2020, the show Adrià Julià: Nem mesmo os mortos sobreviverão [Not Even the Dead Will Survive] — the first solo exhibition of the artist, born in Barcelona in 1974, to be held in Brazil. The show is curated by Fernanda Pitta, the museum’s curator, and artworks will be displayed on the courtyard and in two rooms adjoining the long-term exhibition of Pinacoteca’s collection, on the second floor of the museum building. The works call into question the implications of the techniques of replication, printing and authentication that directed the flow of images in the early days of photography.
open exposition

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