KC Research Portal

Internal publication

Research published in this issue are only for internal circulation within the Royal Conservatoire, The Hague.

The Literary Heritage of Schumann’s ‘Kreisleriana’ (2015) Shin Hwang
Name: Shin Hwang Main Subject: Fortepiano Research Coach: Stefan Petrovic Title of Research: The Literary Heritage of Robert Schumann’s Kreisleriana Research Question: What is the significance of Schumann labeling his piano cycle, after E.T.A. Hoffmann’s collection of works known as Kreisleriana? What aspects of E.T.A. Hoffmann influence Schumann in the composition of his own work? Summary of Research: Upon discovering Schumann’s Kreisleriana, I was drawn to several aspects of the work that aroused in me a curiosity in deciphering what, if any, connection it had to E. T. A. Hoffmann’s work of the same title. While there has been plenty of research done on his Papillons, Opus 2 and its relationship to Jean Paul’s Flegeljahre, I failed to find an indepth study of the relationship between the two Kreislerianas. In this paper, I explore the parallel philosophy of the two writer-composers: their definition of music as ‘tonepoetry’ and their belief in the spiritual power of music. I then compare their shared mission in condemning the musical Philistine and upholding the true artist. Lastly, I examine Hoffmann and Schumann’s use of fragmentation to veil the inner continuity of the work. I conclude that, above all, it is the exuberant fantasy of Hoffmann’s imagination that Schumann attempts to capture in music. Biography: A prize-winner of the 1st International Westfield Fortepiano Competition, Shin Hwang is a versatile keyboardist who has won recognition in both modern and historical performance. In 2011, he was invited by Malcolm Bilson to perform in the United States Library of Congress for the American Musicological Society Lecture Series: “What the Autograph Can Tell Us: Beethoven's Sonata in E major, Opus 109”. As a recipient of the prestigious Fulbright and DAAD Scholarship, he has studied with Jacques Ogg, Robert Hill, and Bart van Oort.
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ZYKLUS BY K.STOCKHAUSEN. ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT STUDY FOR SOLO PERCUSSION (2015) Alfonso Salar Ruiz
Name: Alfonso Salar Ruiz Main Subject: Classical Percussion Research Coach: Paul Scheepers Title of Research: Karlheinz Stockhausen Nr 9 Zyklus Analyses and development study for solo percussion Research Question: How can I work on a piece like Zyklus? What parameters do I need to be aware of? How can I match the demands of the composer? How can I contribute to a better understanding of the concept of the piece? Summary of Results: The approach of my research is focused on two main points. The first one is theoretical and is based on various sources I used for my research, for instance, different opinions and views of people who have worked directly with Stockhausen, various literature sources, questions, etc. The second point is the practical application of my reflections, observations and analysis. In this part I include a discussion of my musical interpretation, the monitoring of my study period and finally, the execution of the piece. This work presents unique challenges manifested in several decisions to be taken in the process of mounting it that will make a big impact in the final result. My intention is also to create a guide for the aesthetic and technical demands of the piece in order to help others to practice it and understand it better. Biography: Alfonso Salar was born in Murcia (Spain) in 1990. He received his Bachelor degree from the Conservatorio Superior de Musica in Zaragoza, concentrating on orchestral playing and contemporary music. Alfonso has attended Masterclasses with international soloists and orchestra percussionist like Katarzyna Myka,Wiland Wetzel, Markus Leoson, Gustavo Gimeno, Andrew Barclay, Oliver Madas, Anton Mittermayer, Colin Corrie. Has has played in youth professional orchestras like JONDE (Spain Youth National Orchestra), NJO (Dutch and Ensemble Academy), SOAP (Symphony Academy Orchestra Of The Pacific). He is continuing his Master studies at the Royal Conservatoire of Music in The Hague.
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My personal development of music-therapy (Muziektherapie) through working with children with autism (2015) Natalia Alvarez-Arenas Arias
Name of student : Natalia Alvarez-Arenas Main Subject : Classical percussion Research coach : Renee Junker, Stefan Petrovic and Arianne In’t Velt Format of documentation :Research paper Title of your research : My personal development of music-therapy (Muziektherapie) through working with children with autism Research question : How can I extend my professional-musical skills to work with and help children with autism? Summary: A professional musician has enough musical knowledge and capability to feel and transmit the music helping to improve health, mental, physical and social problems of children with autism. During the course of the research I worked for 6 months with 8 children with different syndromes of autism by giving them individual music sessions and exploring different ways to support their development through my music skills. All the lessons have been recorded. The results have been quite satisfactory. The children have improved their physical and mental communication and their focus capacities, reducing negative symptoms such as anxiety and isolation, emotional and physical control, listening, coordination and communication with others. Biography: Natalia Alvarez-Arenas (1986) She studied at the Royal Conservatory of Atocha in Madrid where she got her double bachelor degree in Percussion and Percussion Pedagogy in 2009. In 2013 she also finished her bachelor degree at the Royal Conservatory of Den Haag with Fedor Teunisse and Luuk Nagtegaal. All through her career she has played with different orchestras and ensembles. She was one of the leaders of Davai Perkusion ensemble when they won the first prize of the Grachtenfestival in 2013. Now she is a member 4D Kwartet and she runs her own academy of music and movement for children in Den Haag. Recently she has played in projects with Asko Schönberg Ensemble, Slagwerk Den Haag, Residente Orquestra and with Diamantfabrike.
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PROKOFIEV’S SECOND PIANO CONCERTO FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF A PERFORMER (2016) Anto Dimitrov
Name: Anto Dimitrov Main Subject: Piano Research supervisor: Theo Verbey Title of Research: Prokofiev’s Second Piano Concerto from the perspective of a performer Research question: What are some creative and technical approaches to the challenging passages of the Second Piano Concerto by Sergey Prokofiev and what could be done to speed up the learning process? Summary of results: Since last quart of 20th century, Second Piano Concerto by Sergey Prokofiev have been one of the most popular choice in top piano competitions final rounds such as: Queen Elisabeth (Bruxelles), Tchaikovsky (Moscow), Rubinstein (Tel Aviv) and etc. For many artists, it is considered to be one of the most challenging concertos in piano literature and one of favorite choice to perform from Prokofiev. After performing this concerto, I realized that it is very important to have some methods to keep the piece in high performance standard. I saw that it is not possible to be limited with general piano playing traditions for fingering because of non-standardly written passages. By switching the lines on both hands we can make it much more comfortable to perform. Also by analyzing both the orchestral and solo part, we can have more clear idea about the role of the piano solo. Such a great artists recordings as Emil Gilels, Sviatoslav Richter, David Oistrakh and Mstislav Rostropovich who were friends and the first interpreters of several compositions of Prokofiev are the closest references for the idea of his music. Biography: He started his piano education at the age of ten at Antalya Conservatory with Samir Mirzoev. At the age of thirteen he performed his first concert with orchestra. During 2004-2005 concert seasons he attended to the 23th April “Wonder Children” concert organized by Presidency State Symphony Orchestra. He won several awards at several competitions. Some of these are: 
 • First prize and Grand Prix at Third Varna International Piano Competition (2006)
 • Second prize at Bach Competition Plovdiv 2011 
 • Third prize at Young Virtuosos Sofia 2012
 In 2012 he successfully completed his bachelor education at Sofia New Bulgarian University under Prof. Milena Mollova. Since September 2014 he is studying master in Royal Conservatorium Den Haag with Prof. Naum Grubert.
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Korean contemporary recorder music (2015) Jeong Guk Lee
Name: Jeong Guk Lee Main Subject: Recorder Research Coaches: Inês de Avena Braga, Ji Youn Kang Title of Research: Korean contemporary music for the recorder: The influence of Korean culture and traditional music on Korean contemporary music for the recorder Research Question: In Korean contemporary music for the recorder which is influenced by Korean traditional subjects, what kinds of Korean traditional elements were used and how did the composers apply the ideas to their compositions using Western music techniques? Furthermore, how is the recorder applied to express Korean traditional subjects? Summary of Results: In this research, I focused on three different Korean contemporary works for the recorder, Chinese Pictures by Isang Yun, Open your words by Ji Youn Kang and Sibzhangseng by Yoon Bok Suk, each of these compositions being influenced by different kinds of Korean traditions. I have looked up what kind of sources and ideas were used and which materials influenced the music. Through direct contact with the composers of Open your words and Sibzhangseng, I could get more concrete ideas regarding the compositions and, based on this information, I analyzed how they applied their compositional ideas (which were influenced by Korean traditional music and culture) to their own music, as well as how the recorder was adapted in the music. The composers’ take on these cultures on the music, how they applied the recorder in each of their pieces is one of the most crucial points in my research. I figured out how suitable the recorder can be in the aspects of its flexibility, sound and extended techniques to be used to express Korean traditional subjects and create unique effects. In my PowerPoint presentation I will describe what kind of Korean traditional sources and ideas were used and influenced the music and how the composers applied those composition ideas with recorder in the music. I will also show the extended techniques that can be used on the recorder for many other pieces to create other kind of effects if we explore them in other combinations.
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DE STUDIEMETHODIEK VAN PROFESSIONELE NEDERLANDSE ORGANISTEN (2015) Dirk Jan Versluis
Name: Dirk Jan Versluis Main Subject: Organ Research Coach: – Title of Research: De studiemethodiek van professionele Nederlandse organisten Research Question: How do professional Dutch organists study their repertoire? Summary of Results: In this paper was investigated how professional Dutch organists study their repertoire. Professional organists were interviewed about their opinions on five topics: the attention for musical methodology, the best way to approach a new score, the importance of instruments, the role of teaching, liturgical practice and concert practice and finally, memorization. The interviewed organists do value the subject of study methodology, and consider the attention for the subject nowadays as insufficient and too much dependant of the teacher's interest. In approaching a new score several aspects can be recognized. Repetition is important, and so is analysis and understanding. The relationship between those two differs, depending on the repertoire. The choice for an appropriate study instrument is important: touch and sound have a significant influence on the quality of musical study. Pipe organs in church or home are the best options to choose. The repertoire for concerts can be played in liturgical settings too. Both worlds seem to influence each other mutually. Teaching influences the teacher as well: by reflecting on musical and technical issues it forces the teacher to be fully aware of his own decisions and interpretations. Concert preparation largely depends upon the programme, the instrument and the time available. The matter of memorization receives little attention: most of the interviewed organists never performed from memory. They do not think it is of additional value to performer or audience. The fact that organists in the Netherlands typically do not perform from memory can be explained by the large amount of mechanical organs: the performer is not visible, and stop assistants are always needed. Biography: My name is Dirk Jan Versluis (1987). I studied Organ at the Royal Conservatoire (B.M.) and Health Psychology at Dutch Open University (M.Sc.). After some years of working fulltime in healthcare settings and addiction treatment I am very happy to study at the Royal Conservatoire again, this time pursuing my Master's degree.
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Singing cello (2016) Aleix Sala Ribera
Name: Aleix Sala Ribera Main Subject: Cello Research Supervisor: Enno Voorhorst Title of Research: Singing Cello Research Question: How can we use vocal resources in order to improve our cello playing? Summary of Results: A vocal approach to the cello can be extremely beneficial. In this research paper, I analyzed what singers do and how we can transfer some of their resources to cello playing so it can enrich our sense of communication. The results that I came up with are the following: •I have experienced that the use of singing during practice improves the advantage of the time you spend. •Through singing, it is much easier to find your own interpretation and then be able to transmit it to the cello •The use of inner singing while performing gives you much more focus in music and not in technical aspects of the playing. •The importance of breath in playing; the amount of energy that it can give to you, is one the most valuable things I have discovered in my playing. Biography: Aleix Sala was born in 1988 in Barcelona and began studying the cello at the age of eight. He is currently a master student at the Royal Conservatoire with professors Jan-Ype Nota and Michel Strauss. Aleix graduated from the Conservatori Superior del Liceu with Amparo Lacruz in 2013. He has played with orchestras such as Jove Orquestra Nacional de Catalunya, Barcelona Filarmonia and Orquestra de Cambra del Penedès.
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Stretching the string: learning and performing eight pioneering violin studies by Garth Knox (2015) Diamanda Dramm
Name: Diamanda La Berge Dramm Main Subject: Classical Violin Research Coaches: Theo Verbey, Garth Knox Title of Research: Stretching the String Research Question: Learning and performing eight pioneering violin studies by Garth Knox Summary of Results: My research project revolves around a brand new set of eight violin etudes using extended techniques by violist Garth Knox. The etudes are based on his Viola Spaces, Contemporary Viola Studies, which were published by Schott in 2009. However, the new violin studies are tailored to the demands of the contemporary violin repertoire. My involvement in the project includes editing, premiering, and recording the videos that will accompany the publication. Two studies have been completed. Ten Fingers is an all-pizzicato piece that I have had the chance to perform many times in 2014. The study trains finger independency, especially in the right hand. Skating, splitting, scratching focuses on sul ponticello and was completed in January 2015. Aside from the technical benefits, this piece also develops the student’s awareness of the harmonic spectrum. While the project was already developing before my Masters started, my interest in doing a research about it came from a desire to investigate the process. This report documents my learning curve, providing me with the vocabulary necessary to teach the studies to other violinists. Biography: Diamanda La Berge Dramm (1991) grew up in Amsterdam, the Netherlands playing the violin since the age of four. Growing up among the leading figures of the Dutch classical, avant-garde and improvisation scene, her own concerts reflect all of these elements. At the age of thirteen, she premiered “Raadsels” by Louis Andriessen in the Concertgebouw for the opening of the Holland Festival 2005 and has gone on to perform as soloist, chamber music player and band member in venues such as Amsterdam’s Bimhuis, Muziekgebouw aan ‘t IJ as well as the Stone (NYC) and Jordan Hall (Boston). She has worked extensively with modern music luminaries such as Christian Wolff, Alvin Lucier, Gunther Schuller, Chaya Czernowin, Garth Knox and George Benjamin. Recent performances include a collaboration in Florence with Georg Friedrich Haas and concerts in Brussels and London with avant-garde rock legend John Cale.
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The rise of the tuba in the first orchestral repertoire (2016) Stefan Knuijt
Name: Stefan Knuijt Main subject: Tuba Research supervisor: Pete Saunders Title of Research: The rise of the tuba in the first orchestral repertoire Research question: How did the tuba and its use develop in the first orchestral repertoire. Summary of Results: The tuba was invented in 1835 by Moritz and Wieprecht. There are 2 main reasons for the invention in this time period: the start of the romantic period (composers were looking for new ‘ways’ and also new instruments) and the industrial revolution (without the right machines it is impossible to build a tuba). So around this time the technical possibilities and the “composers’ psychology” were exactly right to invent the tuba. The most important ancestors of the tuba are the serpent and the ophicleide. The serpent was a wooden instrument with holes and the ophicleide a brass instrument with keys. They both don’t have valves so the invention of the valves was an important development. One of the first pieces that are written for tuba is Wagner’s Ein Faust Overture. To see the change from ophicleide to tuba it is interesting to analyze also some pieces with opicleide parts, like Wagner’s Rienzi, Berlioz’ Symphonie Fantastique and Mendelssohn’s Midsummer Night’s Dream. The register in ophicleide parts is generally higher than in tuba parts (and even lower in contrabass tuba parts, like Wagner’s Rheingold). Also the doublings and the role of ophicleide can be different than the role of the tuba. The ophicleide is more a bass instruments for woodwinds while the tuba is more connected to the brass. Biography: Stefan Knuijt, born on 15 September 1992 in Nieuw -en Sint Joosland, started playing the baritone when he was 8 years old. He studied this instrument at the “Zeeuwse Muziekschool” in Middelburg, with René Passenier. When he was 9 years old, he started to play the piano. Until 2009 he studied piano and composition with Leen de Broekert, also at the “Zeeuwse Muziekschool”. After this Stefan continues his piano courses with Rien Balkenende. He studied composition from 2009 to 2011 at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague, with Calliope Tsoupaki and from 2010 to 2016 tuba with Hendrik Jan Renes at this Conservatoire.
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Let drums do the talking (2015) Daniel van Dalen
Name: Daniel van Dalen Main Subject: Jazz Drums Research Coach: Yvonne Smeets Title of Research: Let Drums Do The Talking Research Question: In what way can you apply communication by spoken word to the drum set in order to improve your playing? Summary of Results: For many musicians music is a language in itself and therefore they do not feel the need to look at our regular language. Some musicians are even far better in communicating on their instrument than communicating in real life. With this research I was not looking for a way to replace language with music, but to be able to get inspiration out of something that is not a primary source for musicians (such as music books, albums, teachers etc.). By looking at just the words of a speech and their phonetic sounds, you will need to use an entirely different approach when you want to create music based on this. You will come up with other melodies and rhythms than you usually would when you work out of your musical idiom. Also the ‘logical form’ in blocks of 4 bars will be far less present as a speech is not written in a logical amount of bars. As a drummer you can play licks and tricks you have mastered in your practice environment, play what you have heard on albums or just play instinctively what you feel like. Personally I wanted to create a method of maintaining a lot of freedom but yet having a certain way of building my grooves and solos. To avoid having to steer your mind with musical theory (play like a certain artist, play sixteenths, use dynamics, play a drum roll etc.…) I wanted to be able to play an idea in as many ways as possible. Using the spoken language covers many difficult theory but yet a person speaks naturally without having to think about all this. Getting to have this natural instinct on your instrument is difficult and subjective to ones opinion but it does lead to a very different way of composing solos and grooves. This research tells you about ways to use the spoken language as an inspiration on your instrument. It covers theory about how we can analyze speech, which is then converted to a method to play this on drums. The presentation will include audio examples of the rhythms written down in the research. Also the rhythms will be shown within a PowerPoint presentation. Biography: Daniel van Dalen is a frequently asked drummer in several groups varying in styles from jazz, pop, theatre and classical music. He is currently most busy with ‘Fuse’ (string ensemble) and ‘Zosja’ (for which he composes as well). Several albums are soon to be released with Daniel playing drums or percussion. Before starting his master study in The Hague in 2013, he studied at the Conservatory of Amsterdam where he graduated in 2010. From his teaching practice he found that comparing speech to playing drums was a good way to get students to comprehend differences in sound on the instrument.
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Efficient Practice Design (2018) Seungjin Kang
Name: Seungjin Kang Main Subject: Classical Horn Research Supervisor: Susan Williams Title of Research: Efficient practice design: utilising a six-step process of borrowing ideas Research Question: How can I develop a practice strategy that involves consciously working with borrowed musical ideas? Summary of Results: The performer implements expressive performance through interpretation within the potential possibilities of the work (and the performer). This research focuses on developing a much more conscious process in which I would know and understand where my musical ideas are coming from. To do this, I used a practice design utilising the six-step process of borrowing ideas from David Kord Murray's Borrowing Brilliance. Prior to the study, I interviewed three horn teachers from the Royal Conservatoire to compare how the musical ideas that these teachers use are formed. I compared their processes of approaching repertoire with the processes described in Murray’s book. I also analysed four (contrasting) recordings of the concerto, noting details of how they were played – also with audio editing software. The analysis of the teachers' responses showed that some of the ‘six steps to borrowing ideas’ featured. In this study, I used principles of the six-step process to design an exercise regime to help me practice Mozart's Horn Concerto No. 4. I used practice notes (logbook) to record the process and analyse the results. As a result, the conscious exercises (in six stages), compared to my earlier way of practicing, enabled more planned execution and showed that a more systematic and efficient interpretation of the work was possible. Going through the ‘six-step processes’ and repeating them enabled new insights and improved interpretation of repertoire. This process is summarised in the form of endless algorithms. Biography: Horn player Seungjin Kang was born in South Korea where he began his musical studies with Seok-jun Lee and Kyung-il Choi. In 2013 he completed his Bachelor's at the Korea national university of arts and at the age of 24 he was appointed the principal horn player of the Cheongju Philharmonic Orchestra of Korea. He studied abroad in this orchestra in 2016 and as a result, is currently pursuing a Master's degree at the Royal Conservatoire of The Hague, where he studies with Martin van de Merwe and natural horn with Teunis van der Zwart. Between 2016-2018 he played at the Rotterdam Philharmonic, Noord Nederlands Orkest, Gergiev Festival, Asko Schönberg, Dutch National Opera Academy.
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Ornamentation in English Song 1600-1650 (2015) Daniël Elgersma
Name: Daniel Elgersma Main Subject: Early Music Singing Research coach: Johannes Boer Title of research: Ornamentation in English Song 1600-1650 Research question: Did 17th century musicians in England perform the English song with ornaments, even when no ornaments were indicated? Are there things we should change in the way we perform this repertoire nowadays? Summary of results: I’m interested in 17th century English song for a long time. Listening to and performing it myself with modern scores I noticed that modern editions look very simple and ‘empty’ and that it is also performed in that way. Since I knew that Italian and French music of the same period used to have a strong costom of (improvised) ornamentation, I started wondering if this was actually also the case in music from England. To find answers to my questions I looked at the life and music of English composers starting with John Dowland and ending with Nicholas Lanier. I’ve been looking into manuscripts and treatises, and I’ve discovered many new things. Especially the things I found out about the music during the second quarter of the century surprised me a lot. I’m sure my discoveries will surprise other people also. I’ve had the pleasure of discovering many nice things about this music and about how it used to be performed back in the time. England has had strong connections with other countries in the late 16th and early 17th century. These connections influenced the musical style in England a lot. In my presentation I will talk about what these influences were and how and where they came from. I will also show different manuscripts of the time and I’ll let the audience listen to beautiful music in which can be demonstrated well the difference between how we perform this repertoire nowadays and how it would have been performed 400 years ago. Biography: Countertenor Daniel Elgersma (1988) started singing as a boy soprano at age 6 in the Martini Boyschoir Sneek (Bouwe Dijkstra) where he soon became a chorister. He obtained Bachelor degree in Early Music Singing at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague as a countertenor, where he now proceeds his Master degree with Lenie v/d Heuvel, Michael Chance, Peter Kooij and Jill Feldman. Daniel participated in masterclasses by Michael Chance, Peter Kooij, Barbara Schlick and Marinda van Kralingen. Daniel sings with Bach Collegium Japan (Masaaki Suzuki), Gesualdo Consort (Harry van der Kamp), Vox Luminis (Lionel Meunier), Ton Koopman en Daniel Reuss touring in Japan, Oman and throughout Europe. Recent soloistic performances include Bach cantatas with Lars
Ulrik Mortensen, Masaaki Suzuki and Purcell’s King Arthur with Jean Tubery.
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The cello in Naples in the early 18th century: teaching methods and performance practice (2015) Ines Salinas Blasco
Name: Inés Salinas Blasco Main Subject: baroque cello Research Coaches: Inês de Avena Braga, Rebeca Ferri Title of Research: The Cello in Naples in the Early 18th Century: Teaching Methods and Performance Practice Research Question: How were cellists instructed in the Neapolitan conservatories at the turn of the 18th century, and how did they contribute to the development of the instrument? Summary of Results: The main goal of my research is to present an overview of performance practices related to the cello in the city of Naples in around 1700, with special focus on the training of this instrument in the Neapolitan conservatori. In order to achieve this, I have studied the historical, cultural and musical context of the time, the teaching methods employed in the Neapolitan conservatories, the skills the pupils were expected to acquire (with special attention to the cellists), and the main roles and duties of professional cellists in the Neapolitan musical scene. I present some biographical information on the main Neapolitan cellists of the period, and offer a catalogue of Neapolitan Baroque cello repertoire. Moreover, I have included in my paper an edition and a recording of two of the pedagogical sources discussed in the paper, in order to further illustrate it and to give an idea of how these materials could have been used in the period. After having completed my paper, I really believe that we, as modern-day performers, should get more inspired by the approach to music learning that the Neapolitan conservatori had. Specifically as historically informed musicians, we should try to get as close as possible to these practices, since this would bring us a better insight about how this music was thought, composed, learnt, experienced and performed. As Neapolitan music became so influential in the middle of the 18th century, and as the pedagogical tools used at the conservatories spread through Europe, this approach might in fact be expanded to an even broader context. The research presentation will include a slideshow presentation and audio files which will bring an idea of the learning resources that on that time and period were used to teach the cello. Biography: Inés is a musician specialized in the historical performance of the cello and the viola da gamba. She holds a Bachelor Degree on classical cello from the CSMA (Zaragoza, ES), and on historical cello from the Koninklijk Conservatorium (Den Haag, NL). She is a Master’s student under the the guidance of Jaap ter Linden on the historical cello, and Mieneke van der Velden on the viola da gamba. She has performed with the Britten-Pears Baroque Orchestra (UK) Orquesta Barroca Conde Duque (ES) and with I Giovani della Montis Regalis 2013 (IT). She is a founder member of Scaramuccia and Duo Graziani. inessalinas.webs.com/
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Polyrhythms: Understanding, analysis and interpretation (2015) Sergi Sempere i Ramos
Main Subject: Classical Percussion Research Coach: Paul Scheepers Title of Research: Polyrhythms: Evolution, analysis and interpretation Research Question: How did the percussion repertoire reach the levels of huge difficulty we have nowadays with polyrhythms? How can I practice in efficient way these pieces that seem to be impossible to play? Can we find any relationship between polyrhythms and pitches? Summary of Results: As a percussionist, I have often been challenged by pieces with a high level of rhythmic structures. Pieces I had to analyze previously to be able to understand them before start practicing. The most important thing in this kind of analysis is the rhythm. What I do in this research is an analysis of the common polyrhythms that we have in the percussion repertoire. I talk about the evolution that was made during the last centuries, and l explain the ways I found to practice and understand them better. The presentation will include some videos and recordings, as well as a PowerPoint document and some musical examples I will play. Biography Sergi comes from Alicante, Spain. He studied from 2009 since 2012 at the CSMA (Advanced academy of music of Aragón) and nowadays he is enrolled as second year orchestral Master student at Koninklijk Conservatorium Den Haag. He has played with the Residentie Orkest The Hague Philarmonic and has collaborated with other professional and youth orchestras like the Dutch Orchestra and Ensemble Academy, Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Schleswig-Holstein Festival Orchestra, Orchestra Nationale do Porto, Radio Filharmonisch Orkest and Het Gelders Orkest.
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Possibilities of instrumentation of the Italian madrigal (2015) Johan de Wijs
Name: Johan de Wijs Main Subject: Baroque Trombone Research Coach: Wouter Verschuren Title of Research: Possibilities of instrumentation of the Italian madrigal Research Question: What are the possibilities of instrumentation of the Italian madrigal other than the all-vocal ensemble? Summary of Results: The practice of changing instrumentation in Italian vocal music is a commonly applied practice, but what historical precedent is there for this practice? And what were de reasons for 16th-century performance to turn a polyphonic piece into something that could be called a pseudo-monody? It seems strange that one would write a composition with complicated polyphony, with voices of equal importance, only to change it to something completely else when performed. This study explores the possible reasons performers and composers might have had to do so, and tries to give a complete image of the cultural circumstances leading to this practice. In this study, the consequences of these findings for the modern performer will be discussed. The presentation will supply an answer to these questions through looking at the history of the Italian madrigal and its predecessors through the teachings and opinions of leading musicologists, as well as listening examples and score study of musical examples, to be shown through a PowerPoint presentation. Biography: Johan was born in 1985 in Oirschot, Noord-Brabant. From an early age Johan started playing the trombone in a local windband. Shortly thereafter he was admitted to follow the Young Talents programme at the Brabants Conservatory of Tilburg. After several year of studying Johan completed his studies at the conservatory of Lausanne, Switzerland, with honors. After completing his studies on the modern instrument he discovered a new interest in early music practise and decided to sign up for the Masters Programme Early Music in The Hague, to specialize in this field.
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ASD, Music perception and Music Therapy (2015) Helmke Jansen
Name: Helmke Jansen Main Subject: Classical Oboe, Orchestra master Research Coaches: Anna Scott, Fleur Bouwer Title of Research: Autism Spectrum Disorder, Music Perception and Music Therapy Research Question: Is there a scientific basis for the use of music therapy in the ASD population? Summary of Results: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a pervasive developmental disorder causing deficits in various domains including socio-emotional development, communication and perception. It is known that people with ASD can be drawn to music, as also shown by anecdotal evidence concerning musical savants. In addition, there is a higher incidence of absolute pitch in people with ASD than in the normal population. With my expertise both in music and clinical child and adolescent studies, I wondered whether there is a scientific basis for the use of music therapy in the ASD population. According to a large body of research, this is in fact the case. Processing deficits associated with ASD seem to be less present for musical information. Despite characteristic difficulties in perceiving emotions in the self and others, ASD causes no problems in perceiving emotions in music. Perceiving details as well as global musical information, people with ASD are very attentive listeners. The ASD brain seems to have a priority for musical over social auditory information processing. Given the preference for a clear and structured environment, music – as a highly structured stimulus - seems to calm and even reward the ASD brain. Research on efficacy of music therapy interventions has shown improvements in joint attention, eye contact, social engagement, socio-emotional reciprocity, verbal communication, attention, and motivation. The strength of their musical brain can be of great use in motivating and engaging people with ASD to work on goals in all possible domains. Biography: Helmke Jansen began her student years at the University of Leiden in 2006, where she studied Education and Child Studies combined with the minor Practicum Musicae at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague. During this minor it became more and more clear that oboe was actually her real passion, and therefore she entered a fulltime program of musical studies in 2009. This same year she graduated with a Bachelor’s degree from Leiden. After a few years focusing on music, she began the Master’s Program of Clinical Child and Adolescent Studies, which led to the title of Master of Science in February 2014. Since 2014 she has been studying in the Orchestra Master’s Program of the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague.
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Easter Lamentations for solo voice in Spain during the 17th century (2015) Victoria Cassano McDonald
Name: Victoria Cassano Main subject: Early Music Singing Research coaches: Raúl Angulo, Inês de Avena Braga Title: Easter Lamentations for Solo voice in Spain during the 17th century Research Question: What information is available about the performance of Easter lamentations for solo voice in Spain and how can we get closer to their historical performance practice? Summary of Results: The Easter lamentations are musical settings of the texts from the book of Lamentations by the prophet Jeremiah, describing the destruction of Jerusalem in 587 b.c. They are sung during the Triduum Sacrum, the last three days of the Holy Week - Maundy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday - during the Tenebrae service. Many composers have set music to these texts through history, including Victoria, Lassus and Tallis. In the 17th century lamentations for solo voice with instrumental accompaniment started being composed all over Europe, and became very popular especially in France, where they receive the name of “Leçons de Tenebres”, with the famous settings by Charpentier and Couperin. In Spain it was also a popular genre, but it has not yet been studied in depth and there is not much information available about its performance. This research started with the goal of discovering a repertoire unknown to me before, getting as close as possible to its historical performance practice, and being able to perform some of these pieces, some of which have not been performed in centuries. One of the objectives was to get to know how many of these pieces survive and make a list of the ones that have been already discovered. I have so far managed to put together a list of over thirty lamentations for solo voice from different musical archives in Spain. Some of these works have been catalogued in their respective archives, but are not yet available for the general public as they have not yet been edited nor performed in modern times. Studying musical treatises of the time such as Cerone (1613), Torres (1702), Nassarre (1723) and Valls (1742) I have discovered many useful aspects of performance practice that can be applied to the performance of lamentations, such as the singers who performed them, the instruments that were used for their accompaniment, including the harp and the dulcian, and the basic rules of accompanying sacred music. In my presentation I will show some musical examples of lamentations for solo voice, applying some of the rules found in these treatises as well as using historical pronunciation of Spanish Latin, together with a powerpoint presentation with some general characteristics of the music of the time. Biography: Victoria Cassano (Madrid, 1987) began her musical studies playing both piano and violin in her hometown. In 2008 she graduated from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, with a Bachelor degree in Music teaching. During her university studies she started having singing lessons, and soon after she decided to move to The Netherlands to continue her studies at the Royal Conservatory in the Hague, studying both Classical and Early Music singing with Rita Dams, Jill Feldman, Michael Chance and Peter Kooij, where she is now specializing in the performance of Spanish sacred music of the 17th century.
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Stanislavsky's system for musicians (2016) Anastasia Feruleva
The system of a famous russian theatre director, actor and pedagogue Konstantin Stanislavski was created for actors to draw believable emotions to their performances. It is a whole set of exercises to be practised daily in order to control better such uncontrollable aspects as emotions, inspiration, improvisation at the moment. Some principals seemed for me familiar with those we as musicians are trying to learn. In my research I wanted to see the connection between the theatre and the music worlds and to try to see whether these system is applicable for musicians and in which way.
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Arranging works of J. S. Bach for guitar (2015) Hrvoje Hleb, Enno Voorhorst
Name: Hrvoje Hleb Main subject: Classical guitar Research coach: Enno Voorhorst Research question: What changes must/can one make when arranging J. S. Bach´s works for guitar? Summary of results: Even though J. S. Bach never composed or arranged anything for guitar, through his own arrangements for other instruments, he left us some sort of study example of what changes we can make when arranging his music for guitar. In his arrangements, Bach did not hesitate to change the original key if it was needed to make a composition playable or more suitable for the chosen instrument. If he was arranging for an instrument able to play more voices, he would often compose new voices, and similarly, the other way around. In the vast majority of cases he would have kept the original rhythm, harmony and melody, but if there was a just cause, he would have changed even that. By following his example, we can do the same when making an arrangement for guitar, but it is important to find the balance between staying close to the original and making it sound natural on the guitar. To capture both of those, would be ideal, but on the guitar we are often forced to make compromises. What to sacrifice and where the line of balance is, is personal, but some things must be respected. One must keep the core idea and character of the movement, to stay in style and to make it suitable and natural sounding for the guitar. In my presentation I will show some examples of what I did in my arrangement of Bach´s second Sonata for violin solo BWV 1003 with explanations as to why I made certain changes and also I will play some recordings of creative solutions of other arrangments. Biography: I was born in January 28th 1989 in Vinkovci, Croatia. I started playing guitar at age of 8, and attended music school in Vinkovci. Aged 18 I enrolled at the Music academy in Zagreb, from which I graduated five years later with the class of Darko Petrinjak. During my studies I participated in masterclasses with Ana Vidović, Zoran Dukić, Aniello Desiderio and Carlo Marchione.
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The classical Musician 2.0 (2015) Anne Overpelt
Name: Leonie Freudenberger Main Subject: Jazz Saxophone Research Coach: Karst de Jong Title of Research: Approaching Jazz composition through the music of Billy Strayhorn Research Question: What are the most important elements of Billy Strayhorn's compositions? How can I incorporate his compositional approach in my own writing? Summary of Results: Billy Strayhorn (1915–1976) was a jazz pianist, composer, arranger, orchestrator and lyricist whose works have influenced the genre of jazz music up until today. The research contains two phases: First, the analysis of his compositions. Second, the attempt to compose originals using the detected stylistic, harmonic, melodic and conceptional tools. Considering the enormous oeuvre that Strayhorn produced, it is inevitable to have to make a selection of songs to analyze. My criteria for this selection are the following: Which songs have become part of the standard repertoire in jazz, performed by various artists throughout the 20th (and 21st) century? Where can I find aural trademarks, which I recognize both as a listener and as a player and which contribute to my personal perception of the “Strayhorn sound”? Can the compositions be reduced to a lead sheet and performed by a small jazz combo without losing their essence? My final intention is not only to compose using Strayhorn-typical elements and tools, but also to write music for myself as a performer and for my group to play it. On longer terms, I hope that I can abstract this method further on and profit from it beyond the results of this research. Biography: Leonie Freudenberger, born 1988 in Baden-Baden (D), has played the alto saxophone since her childhood. She started her professional jazz education at the University of Music in Mannheim in 2008 and came to Den Haag in 2011, where she finished her Bachelor's degree. Apart from her Master studies, she writes music and performs with her own group and takes part in various projects, playing alto and baritone saxophone.
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Baritone saxophone in jazz quartet (2016) Emilio Nunzio Tritto
Name: Emilio Nunzio Tritto Main subject: Jazz Saxophone Title of the research: Baritone saxophone in jazz quartet Research question: what are the aspects involved in creating and performing a repertoire with baritone saxophone as solists in jazz quartet? Summary of results: through a historical overview and the analysis of the most relevant releases of the great baritone players of jazz history, I've been able to recover different solutions and ideas to create a repertoire of original pieces suitable for quartet, concerning composing, arranging, selection of the instrumentation, theme exposition, solo contents, and eventual issues. I finalized my work displaying my works and my choices about technical and artistic aspects concerning my own quartet.
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The Keyboard Sonata Accompanied by the Violin in England in the XVIII Century. (2015) Patrícia Ferreira Vintém
Name: Patrícia A. Ferreira Vintém Main subject: Harpsichord Research coaches: Enrico Gatti and Kathryn Cok Title of Research: The Keyboard Sonata Accompanied by the Violin in England in the XVIII Century. Research Question: Why was the fashion of composing this kind of sonata widely spread and worthy of such attention in the eighteenth century, in England? Summary of results: The eighteenth century was fairly known and associated with a style in which the simple and charming music lines filled the halls of the middle class and high society. This was known as the Gallant Style. Music had different purposes and this specific repertoire, the accompanied sonata, such as pedagogical purposes was used in gatherings to entertain guests and give young ladies an opportunity to share their artistic accomplishments with their fathers, brothers or husbands who would accompany them on the violin. Many were the composers who dedicated these compositions to their students and patrons, and many were the publishers who attributed a quota of their catalogues to it. The keyboard sonata with the accompaniment for violin was a fashionable genre during the second half of the eighteenth century in the popular capitals of Europe such as London. Though this repertoire seemed to have an important role in the eighteenth century music consumption, nowadays little attention is given to it. This research aims to bring alive a genre now in oblivion, exposing the importance of rediscovering a repertoire which is part of the early music composers’ legacy. This research, presented through a visual aid and illustrated in audio excerpts, will expose the most important facts involved in the practice and development of this repertoire as well as its main characteristics. Biography: I am a Portuguese harpsichordist, who came to The Netherlands pursuing a deeper knowledge of Early Music performance. I graduated in harpsichord in 2009 in the Superior School of Music, Lisbon, concluded the Bachelor in 2013 in The Hague and I am currently finishing my Master’s degree. I have been instructed by Jacques Ogg and Fabio Bonizzoni. I have co-founded two ensembles: Les Esprits Animaux, with which I have recorded two CD’s and played in Europe, in main early music festivals, and also in Japan; and the DuoVintem&Lupiáñez, whose performance core is the repertoire presented in this research.
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Pulse and Rhythm (2015) Marije de Jong
Marije de Jong Cello Research coach, Gerard Bouwhuis Pulse and Rhythm, a report in search for puls. Rhythm is the basis of music, as it makes it accessible for the audience. In my experience, musicians can be divided into two groups; those who are initially oriented towards rhythm and those who are initially directed towards melody. I feel I’m more of the second kind, and in order to get a better feeling for pulse and rhythm I decided to write a report on a search for pulse. For this report I wrote rhythmic etudes and exercises for cello, in order to strengthen the inner pulse. Biography: Marije de Jong was born in 1988 in Eindhoven, The Netherlands. At the age of twelve she started playing the cello. In 2007 Marije started her Bachelor studies cello at the Fontys conservatore Tilburg with Paul Uyterlinde. After an Erasmus to the Robert Schumann-Hochschule in Dusseldorf with Gregor Horsch, she graduated from her bachelor in 2012. In 2013 she was accepted to the masters of the Royal conservatoire The Hague with Larissa Groeneveld and Roger Regter, and to the orchestra master of the Residentie orchestra. During her studies she always preferred orchestra playing and participated in a lot of orchestras o.a. the National Youth Orchestra, Gustav Mahler Jugend Orchestra, Filharmonie Zuid-Nederland and the Residentie orchestra. This June she is hoping to graduate from her masters cello.
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Research Proposal - Johannes Brahms Third Piano Sonata (2016) Pablo Moreno
I found a very strong stylistic connection between Brahms Third Piano Sonata and his symphonic music when I started to learn the piece. There are some aspects, such as the doubling of the notes, the use of an extense texture or the variety in the articulation, which look for a grandiose sound closer to the sound of the symphonic pieces. A fact which makes me sure about this idea is the impression that Robert Schumann had when he listened first time Brahms Piano Sonatas in Düsseldorf. He said there were “hidden symphonies inside the sonatas” .I had a similar feeling when I started to learn the piece. Being very interested in the orchestration and the imitation of the instruments trough the piano, I decided to do my Research about this topic. My Research Question is: How can we, imaginatively, orchestrate the Brahms Third Piano Sonata trough the piano and how does it affect how we play it?
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Master Research (2016) Vera Schippers
Name: Vera Schippers Main subject: Music education according to the Kodály concept Research supervisor: Renee Jonker Title of research: Collaboration and creativity in Kodály inspired music lessons Research question: How can I create more space for collaboration and creativity in music lessons inspired by the Kodály concept when applied to group 6/7. Summary of results: During the action part of the research, I tried different ways of using collaboration and creativity in Kodály inspired music lessons, and looked at the influence of both aspects on the groups dynamic and involvement of the pupils. Because there are lots of different activities in my music lessons which are Kodály inspired, I incorporated more activities which are focusing on collaboration and creativity. By giving more assignments in smaller groups I tried to focus on both aspects. That is one way how I can create more space for collaboration and creativity. Next to that there are other ways to encourage collaboration and creativity. By making conscious decisions about the focus of the role of the teacher (leader). The focus can be teaching or coaching. Both focusses are needed during lessons but when you act like a coach the responsibility is with the pupils. This creates ownership which has a positive effect on the involvement of the pupils and the quality of the music making. By encouraging the collaborative aspect in music lessons, the formation of the pupils plays an important part. There should always be enough variety in formations but by playing an activity in a circle they automatically make a natural connection and it has a positive influence on the group dynamics and the involvement of the pupils. This way all individuals are taking care of the group needs next to their individual needs. By using different activities, being aware of the role of the teacher, creating ownership by the pupils and by choosing formations which help them connect to each other, I used collaboration and creativity in my music lessons. They are Kodály inspired and contribute to making a unity during the musical lessons but also take care of the individual needs. This, above all, in a playful way. Biography: My name is Vera Schippers, I am 23 years old and live in Tilburg. Before starting my Master at the Royal conservatory, I studied for becoming a music teacher at the Fontys school of arts in Tilburg. There, I taught music lessons to a lot of different target groups. Primary school and special needs educations turn out to be my favorites. Nowadays, I work at several primary schools in Best, where I teach music children aged 10 tot 12. Next to that I give singing lessons to several musical groups from different ages.
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Arranging piano pieces by Rachmaninov for string quartet (2015) Leo Nikishin
Rachmaninov did not write any music for string quartet in his artistic maturity. The two known quartets are very early works written by a undoubtedly talented teenager that had yet to find his style and finesse. As such, it does not seem relevant to study those early quartets in order to determine the best way to arrange Rachmaninov's pieces composed at later stages of his life.
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Master research (2015) Daan van Koppen
Name: Daan van Koppen Main Subject: Classical Saxophone Research Coach: Karts de Jong Titel of Research: The Dutch Saxophone and Repertoire Research Question: Is there a typical Dutch sound and what are the influences of the composers. Why do all modern saxophone players only play transcriptions? What happened with the Dutch saxophone repertoire. Summary of Results: In the beginning of my Master studies, I reached a moment that I did not know any more what kind of pieces I could study. When I was busy with searching for new pieces to play, I came out with some great Dutch pieces and I am started to wonder why a lot of these pieces are almost never played again. It’s such I pity that nowadays many new conservatory students are only busy with the French repertoire and do not realise that there are also a lot of great Dutch compositions. At the moment, most of the classical saxophone players only play transcriptions, from clarinet and oboe sonatas and string quartets arrangements. But why are we doing this? Why are we pretending like if we are on other instrument? In my research I will tell a bit about the background and how it all started and try to find out what the situation was now and then with Dutch saxophone playing and repertoire. I did an interview with the first Dutch saxophone legend Ed Bogaard and the legend from now Arno Bornamp. I give some examples of Dutch pieces from important composes like the concerto from Tristan Keuris and Hout from Louis Andriessen. And I made a Dutch repertoire catalogue to promote the Dutch music and hopefully stimulate saxophone players and make them aware how many great Dutch pieces are written. Biography: Daan van Koppen was born in 1990 in Poeldijk, Netherlands. He is studying classical Saxophone at the Royal Conservatorie in The Hague with David Kweksilber and Frank Timpe. Also he followed lessons with Leo van Oostrom. He followed masterclasses with Kyle Horch, Martin Erikson, Jörgen Pettersson and Sascha Armbuster. For three months he followed the Erasmus course at the Royal College of Music in Londen studying with Kyle Horch. Daan is a member of “The Hague Saxophone quartet” and is the main baritone saxophone player of the Trompetterkorps der Koninklijke Marechaussee. As a saxophone teacher, Daan teaches at various music schools in the South of Holland. In the summer of 2011 he went with a project saxophone quartet to Macau (China) where they gave concerts, workshops and lessons.
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THE INFLUENCE OF RECORDINGS IN PIANO PRACTICE IN THE 20TH CENTURY (2015) Javier Krohn Montalvo
Name: Javier Krohn Main Subject: Classical Piano Research Coach: Anna Scott Title of Research: The Influence of Recordings in Piano Practice in the 20th Century Research Question: Did the proliferation of the recording industry in the 20th century either coincide with or create a change in taste in piano performance? If it indeed catalysed a change in how pianists perform, what specific performance parameters were affected and why? Summary of Results: Since the advent of recordings, the performance of music has changed. What once was composed and performed in order to be enjoyed in a single moment, can now be captured and reproduced over and over, and thus the core significance of music has changed. But what exactly has been the nature of this change? In this research, I have analyzed recordings of Au Bord d’une Source by Liszt as performed by three pianists that grew up in a world with fewer recordings, and as performed by three pianists that grew up while being able to listen to many recordings of other people. This research has shown that although all the pianists discussed are great artists, the pianists whose musical personalities were formed before WWII (when recordings were not so omnipresent) play in a much freer way, as they were still not so concerned about having to produce “perfect” interpretations. With the aid of live and recorded examples, the presentation will take a look at the specific ideological and performative differences between those two groups of pianists, differences in pre- and post-WWII recording practices, and how such knowledge can be applied to performances today. Biography: Born in 1989 in Madrid, Javier Krohn graduated with honours in piano and chamber music studies at the Professional Conservatoire of Music “Arturo Soria” of Madrid at the age of 16. He continued his studies with Claudio Martínez Mehner at the Superior Conservatoire of Music of Zaragoza, and is currently studying at the Royal Conservatoire of Music in The Hague with Naum Grubert. He received further musical inspiration and guidance from Maria João Pires, Stanislav Pochekin, Robert Levin, Alexander Kandelaki, and Nino Kereselidze. Javier Krohn has been awarded several national and international prizes such as “Hazen Intercentros,” “Ciudad de San Sebastián,” “Ciutat de Carlet,” “Santa Cecilia” from Segovia, and “Jacinto Guerrero” from Toledo. He has also performed numerous concerts and recitals in Spain, The Netherlands, Germany, Italy, Portugal, Austria and the EEUU.
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The Painting Musician (2015) Alice Thompson
Name: Alice Thompson Main Subject: Classical Flute Research Coach: Patrick van Deurzen Title of Research: What aspects of Visual Art (Painting) may be adopted by Musicians to enhance their musical understanding / performance? Research Question: Will the musician find that the act of painting their piece / orchestral excerpt makes them more imaginative and clearer (more successful) in the message they want to portray to the audience / audition panel? Is it important whether or not the musician paints his / her piece in an abstract style or a representational / figurative style? What is the importance of colour and form to the musician? Summary of Results: At the end of the Eighteenth Century, the Romantic movement began to spread across Europe and revolutionise the expression of The Arts. The overall aim of The Arts shifted from one of mere imitation to one which projected intense emotions and consequently, since then, a strong interdependence between music and painting has existed. This study explores the ways in which painting can be most beneficial to the musician. Having first researched existing key theories relating to music and painting including: Nietzsche's philosophy, which calls for music to always have a pictorial counterpart to be fully comprehended. The suggestion from Zelter that the musician/composer that paints or the artist that composes/ plays music has a greater potential to become the 'best genuine artist'. There have been numerous attempts to synthesize the two Art Forms: tone poems, sound sculptures, kinetic paintings and the ultimate Gesamtkunstwerk. From these and other theories key topics have emerged including: - The Boundaries and Characteristics of Music and Painting. - Music and Colour. - Abstract Painting vs Figurative Painting and The Musician. The research has found colour can help the musician discover the structure of the music and highlight keynotes, intervals or link together movements of a larger work. Abstract Painting allows direct comparisons to be made to music linking line and colour with rhythm and tone. Figurative Painting allows the musician to summarise the overall character of a piece through personal association. Music becomes tangible. The presentation will look further in depth at the above 3 key topics and through examples aim to demonstrate the power of painting and music in combination. Biography: Alice Thompson has been living and studying in The Hague since September 2012. In 2012 she graduated with First Class Honours from her Bachelor of Music Performance degree at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance. At Trinity Alice studied with Anna Noakes (flute) and Alan Baker (piccolo). She is now in the final year of her Master studies at the Royal Conservatoire under the tutelage of Thies Roorda (flute) and Dorine Schade (piccolo).
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A personal way to internalize bebop language on the double bass through the blues-solo playing of Paul Chambers (analysis and exercises) (2015) Balázs Horváth
Name: Balázs Horváth Main Subject: Jazz Double Bass Research Coach: Jarmo Hoogendijk Title of Research: A personal way to internalize bebop language on the double bass through the blues-solo playing of Paul Chambers (analysis and exercises) Research Question: How can I find better improvisational language by analyzing Paul Chambers' solos on blues tunes, and through what methods and exercises can I apply those outcomes into my own practice when playing solos on the double bass? Summary of Results: The style we call “bebop” was developed in the 1940-s in the USA. This style is the basis of all new styles in modern Jazz, and this improvisational language is the starting point to the further, more extended languages in jazz. So for all of us Jazz musicians its deeper understanding and implementing to our own playing is more than essential. I always found the way Paul Chambers plays the bebop language on the instrument amazing. It's fluent, melodic, it has a natural flow and incredible variety, and the phrasing is really full of life. Since I knew he was among the first double bass players who entirely understood and transformed the bebop language for this instrument, it was logical to find him and his playing as the key for further studies in a more detailed way. The way to the deeper understanding in jazz is by making transcriptions. I have chosen a few blues tunes that he had solos in, then some more, to see the differences and possible similarities as well. Blues tunes seemed ideal to start researching: jazz players play them in great numbers, in more tonalities than a usual standard tune. I also tried to find blues solos of him in different tonalities, for comparison, in order to see how this factor can change his playing. The result of this research is better playing in not only the blues tunes, but in all bebop or standard tunes as well for me. Even the analysis and the continuous listening to the material gave a lot of ideas. Later on the development and the practice of the exercises also helped to get closer to the language and to the practical use of the analysis. I used to record the concerts I play usually, and if I listen back my blues solo playing before I started researching it, the difference is quite clear. Biography: I was born in Budapest, Hungary. I started to learn music after secondary school, first on the electric bass, and I received my first bachelor degree in Budapest on that instrument. I also started to learn the double bass as well, and became a professional musician on this instrument. I received my second bachelor on this instrument, studying also for a year at the Conservatoire National Superieur (CNSM) in Paris. I continued my studies with Wayne Darling in Graz privately in 2010-2012. I started my master studies at the KC in The Hague in 2013 with Clemens van der Feen.
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New discoveries of Vivaldi in Dresden (2015) Javier Lupiañez Ruiz
Name: Francisco Javier Lupiáñez Ruiz Main Subject: Baroque Violin Research Coach: Charles Toet Title of Research: New Discoveries of Vivaldi in Dresden Research Question: Is Vivaldi the composer of the Sonata (Mus.2-R-8,74), the Trio Sonata (Mus.2-Q-6) and the Concerto (Mus.2-O-1,45)? Summary of Results: The Schrank II (Cabinet II) collection from the Die Sächsische Landesbibliothek – Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Dresden (SLUB) is not only one of the most interesting archives open to the worldwide audience thanks to the new technologies but also one of the major archives of Vivaldi's instrumental music. Although the archive had been digitized and studied there are more than 60 sonatas for violin and continuo, around 12 string trio sonatas and most than 50 concertos remaining anonymous. A Sonata for violin and continuo, a Trio Sonata for violin, violoncello and continuo and a Concerto for violin and orchestra captured my attention due its similarities with Vivaldi. Through the analysis of the external features of the sources (paper, watermarks, copyist, etc.) and the analysis of the style and language of Vivaldi and its characteristics, the final goal of this work is to highlight the possibility of a Vivaldi authorship as much as possible. In other words, attempting to put together the strongest proofs and facts that can be used to point to Vivaldi as author of the analyzed pieces. In the light of the results of the present research, the Vivaldi attribution is very consistent. An explanation of the attribution methodology and its application to the pieces will be shown in a slideshow presentation. Biography: Javier was born in Melilla (Spain), where he received several prizes in performing and composition. He has lead ensembles such the Baroque Orchestra of the Superior Conservatory of Salamanca, Baroque Orchestra of Salamanca, the European Baroque Academy of Ambronay and Academia Montis Regalis. As cofounder of the ensemble Les Esprits Animaux he plays regularly in Spain, Portugal, France, Italy, Germany, Japan and The Netherlands, and has recorded for the label Harmonia Mundi. Javier has a baroque violin Verbeek made in 1682 on loan from the collection of The Dutch Musical Instruments Foundation.
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Performing contemporary compositions for viola (2016) Thora Sveinsdóttir
Name: Thora Margrét Sveinsdóttir Main Subject: Classical Viola Research Coach: Patrick van Deurzen Title of Research: Performing Contemporary Compositions for Viola Research Question: What is needed in addition to the traditional study methods for viola to meet the technical demands of the modern viola repertoire? Summary of Results: Twentieth century music idioms such as free tonality, complex rhythm and requests of different timbres are hardly ever a part of a violists musical training. By gathering information from dissertations on this subject and examining the standard repertoire, as well as more contemporary compositions, I came to the conclusion that the following subjects needed more attention in the pedagogic preparation for violists: Post tonal scales, advanced rhythm, harmonics, microtones, dissonant double stops, secondary bow techniques and extended techniques. The general perception I encountered before starting this research was that there is no pedagogic material existing that features these techniques. This was my starting point. However, my research has led me to discover over a dozen works especially written for the purpose of introducing contemporary techniques to students. Contemporary studies that prepare students for playing twentieth and twenty-first century music do exist but are not yet included in the standard pedagogic literature every student has to master to obtain a degree in music. A strong emphasis is on transcribed violin etudes that are better suited for the repertoire of the nineteenth century, which does not form a big part of the traditional repertoire for viola. Biography: Thora Margrét Sveinsdóttir was born in 1987 and grew up in Reykjavík, Iceland. Before being admitted to the Master Program at Koninklijk Conservatorium in Den Haag, she earned a degree in Viola Performance from Prins Claus Conservatorium in Groningen (B.M. ‘12) with a performer and teacher profile. Her teacher during that time was Ervin Schiffer. A dedicated advocate of music by living composers, Thora has performed on contemporary music festivals in Iceland giving concerts dedicated to solo viola works in 2013 and 2014. She has performed with Iceland’s leading contemporary ensemble Caput and is currently a member of Skark String Ensemble.
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Comparing the differences and similarities of structure and performance in the Sonatas for Two Pianos and Percussionist by Hungarian composer Bela Bartok and Bulgarian composer Stefan Ikonomov. (2019) Ivan Pavlov
Research Proposal Name: Ivan Pavlov Main subject: Classical Department, Piano Name of the research coach: Anna Scott Title of the research: Comparing the differences and similarities of structure and performance in the Sonatas for Two Pianos and Percussionist by Hungarian composer Bela Bartok and Bulgarian composer Stefan Ikonomov. Research question: Do comparisons between the two sonatas, especially where structure is concerned, reveal how each composer either destroys or plays with sonata form; and can such an analysis help performers to better understand and perform the two works? Motivation/ rationale and goal of the research project: My personal goal in this research project is to analyse and better understand the two sonatas, especially where form is concerned. I want to discover how the two composers either establish or destroy the structures of sonata form, how they develop their musical materials, and how they play with different timbres of the instruments, so that I can be able to perform each work better. Research process and planning: What I’m planning to include in the research: First: To discuss the lives of the two composers, the historical and musical context of each of the sonatas in question, and what inspired them to each write a sonata for two pianos and percussion. Second: To provide a comprehensive and detailed analysis of each of the sonatas, with particular focus on each work’s formal properties, the materials they use, their use of sonata form, and instrumentation issues. Third: To formulate concrete examples of how these analyses have helped me to better understand and perform the two pieces. The materials from which I started are: 1. The workshop of Bartok and Kodaly, by Erno Lendva 2. I’m arranging an interview with the wife of Stefan Ikonomov. 3. Elementary theoretical knowledge of both works. 4. Article about Stefan Ikonomov: “The composer, the pianist, the teacher” written by Rostislaf Iovchev, in Magazine of Musical Horizons. Chosen format of documentation: Research Paper
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An Etude Manual For The Bow (2015) Sean Hawthorne
Name: Sean Hawthorne Main Subject: Cello Research Coach: Stefan Petrovic Title of Research: An Etude Manual For The Bow Question: How can we best use a short collection of etudes to build the foundation for the consistent development of artistic freedom in the bow? Summary of Results: Etudes are extremely beneficial to instrumentalists because of their unique ability to build fundamentally important techniques while simultaneously applying them to musical ideas. It is very easy to select the etudes that one plays based on arbitrary factors. I propose here a short collection of etudes that have been chosen because of the ways in which they compliment one another. The point of this manual is to introduce a new and organized way of thinking about physical development through etudes. My aim is to introduce cellists to a way of approaching these works with utmost awareness. It is imperative that we never stop carefully considering our fundamentals, developing new techniques or pushing our acquired techniques beyond current limit. Cellists have been given the tremendous gift of a thoroughly comprehensive selection of etudes. Many of the most historically relevant performing cellists contributed to the literature through their own etude compositions. In this report, I focus on David Popper, Carlo Alfredo Piatti and Jean-Louis Duport. I have chosen two etudes by each composer that together provide an integrated and synergistic daily education in the use of the bow as an artistic medium. This is a collection of six etudes which, when practiced in succession, will establish a greater foundation for fluid and elegant artistic expression in the bow. Even more importantly, it will demonstrate a method of daily etude practice that any cellist can replicate with any etudes to solve physical problems that obstruct artistic output. Biography: Sean Hawthorne is a 23-year-old cellist studying with Michel Strauss and Jan Ype Nota at Koninklijk Conservatorium, Den Haag. Prior to his attendance here, Sean studied The Juilliard School with Richard Aaron. He served as principal cellist of numerous orchestras including the National Repertory Orchestra and the Juilliard Chamber Orchestra. Additionally, Sean performed Tchikovsky’s Variations on a Rococo Theme and Strauss’s Don Quixote as a soloist with the National Repertory Orchestra. In 2014 Sean was selected as the IOS Cello Apprentice with the National Arts Centre Orchestra of Canada. He served as a member of the section for ten weeks.
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The 'cello in Prussia under Frederick the Great (2016) George Ross
Name: George Ross Main subject: baroque cello Research supervisor: Maggie Urquhart Title of research: The 'cello in Prussia under Frederick the Great Research questions: - Who were the cellists active at the court of Frederick the Great? - Did they write any repertoire for their instrument? - What other repertoire is there, written by musicians working at the court during this time? Research format: Research paper Summary of results: When starting out on this subject I had no idea how little information there would be about the cellists who were active at the Prussian court leading up to and during the early reign of Frederick the Great. When I established who these two cellists were, I was hoping to find more information on each of them. It was at this slightly disheartening point in my research, that I decided to look into the other musicians that would have worked in the Hofkapelle with Ignaz Mara. I was incredibly pleased whilst researching the two families, which played an important role in the musical goings on, not only in the court, but also in the more private events, that my research into both the Benda and the Graun families led to three unknown works that I could add to my repertory of this period in Berlin. It was obviously not what I had hoped for, but it was a result, nonetheless and one that still had room to build on. Having decided on eliminating certain areas of research for the sake of focusing on a narrower period of time and within a smaller geographical area, I have still become far more aware of the other musicians around Germany at the time, and have begun to build the connection between a time in Berlin when there was practically no music-making happening, under Friedrich II’s father, Friedrich Wilhelm I’s leadership, to a period when the cellistic development in Berlin flourished, under Friedrich Wilhelm II’s reign (a cellist himself), during the late eighteenth century. Biography: George Ross is a British cellist, specialising in period instrument performance, currently in the second year of his master’s studies at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague where he receives lessons from Jaap ter Linden. Having attained a first class honours for his Bachelor of Music degree at the Royal College of Music in London, George has worked with such groups as The King's Consort, the Academy of Ancient Music, the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, and the Hanover Band. As well as performing orchestrally, in July last year his string quartet, the Consone Quartet was awarded two prizes at the International Young Artists Competition in York; the EUBO Development Trust prize, and a place on the Eeemerging Scheme 2016. In March this year (2016), the Consone Quartet won the Royal Over-Seas League competition.
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Watching Music (2015) Anja Brons
Name: Anja Brons Main Subject: Bassoon Research Coach: Wouter Verschuren Title of Research: Watching Music Research Question: How can the kinetic paintings of Norman Perryman lead to a deeper experience of classical music? Summary of Results: Norman Perryman paints with liquid paint on glass plates that lay on several overhead projectors. The painting is projected on a large screen behind the musicians, in live classical concerts. Because the watercolours are flowing and the paintbrush is moving, it is called “kinetic” painting, which means “moving”. This artist developed the art form of kinetic painting on music for almost forty years, and performed with famous orchestra's, conductors and musicians all over the world. The late violinist Yehudi Menuhin called him “a musician, who makes music with his brush”. His aim is to enhance the music with his kinetic painting. When I saw for the first time a live performance of him, together with a clarinettist, I was very surprised about the way that visual arts and music were brought together, and how that led me to a deeper experience of the music. Although not everyone will have this same experience (some others will experience the painting as detracting), I wanted to research how it can be that his kinetic painting is able to enhance the experience of music for some people, including for me. To come to an understanding of this, I studied the historical context of the combination of visual art and music, and I pointed out the role of synaesthesia. Synaesthesia is a neurological phenomenon in which stimulation of one sensory leads to automatic, involuntary experiences in another sensory. In this case it means that some people automatically see colours when they hear music. Perryman is using this phenomenon in some way in his paintings. An interview with Norman Perryman in his atelier in Amsterdam helped me to come to an understanding of the methods that he is using to paint with classical music. The reason that the kinetic painting is able to lead to a deeper experience can be because of some correspondences between classical music and Perryman's kinetic painting. For example: He intentionally uses an analogue art form, to let it correspond with the purity of the acoustic sound in classical music. Another resemblance is that Perryman does not improvise on the music, but he prepares his compositions carefully; like a classical piece is composed and not improvised, or like a choreography is designed, with an interplay and counterpoint between the musical lines. To approach the subject from different angles (beside the context, my own experiences and the intentions of Perryman) I gathered some remarkable experiences that other people had with the kinetic painting of Perryman: some interviews with musicians that cooperated with him, some reviews of performances in the newspapers, and some responses that Perryman received after the concerts. Biography: Anja Brons was born in the Netherlands, in 1989. She started to play bassoon when she was 9 years old, and at the age of 19 she started to study bassoon at the conservatory in Groningen, in the prepatory year. In this same time she started a study at the Art Academy in Groningen, but after one year she decided to quit there, to be able to focus on the music study. She is still searching for ways to combine her passion for both music and visual arts. In this research these two art forms come together.
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EUPHONIUM HISTORY, EVOLIUTION AND FAMOUS ARTISTS WHO AFFECTED THE POPULARITY OF THE INSTRUMENT (2019) Mindaugas Akelis
An euphonium is described as one of the world’s most recorded solo brass instrument. A lot of players over the world performs a lot of solo music. Euphonium solo with brass band is included almost in every brass band concert. So, composers write a lot of music for solo euphonium. Also euphonium has very wide technique and diapason so we can play a lot of other instruments parts, for example cello, violin, tuba, trumpet and etc. Even famous “Carmen Fantasy” which is written for almost all musical instruments is also playable with euphonium.
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Interpreting pedal indications in R.Schumann’s Kreisleriana, op.16 (2019) Gabriele Zemaityte
This research paper will tackle the difficulty of interpreting pedalling notations in R. Schumann’s piano works of period 1829-1838, with main focus on Kreisleriana op.16. Was Schumann being consistent with the way he notated pedal? Should the pedal markings be executed literally or were they used in order to indicate other musical aspects? What were the different methods of applying the pedal in Schumann’s works? With main focus being Kreisleriana, op.16, references will also be taken from other works of the same decade, such as Papillon, op.2 and Davidsbuendlertaenze, op.6 as they provide great examples of Schumann’s tendencies in pedalling notation.
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Humanizing Performances - A shared concept (2019) José Lima Silva
This question came to me throughout my academic and artistic career, but it became especially pertinent to me during my final recital of the bachelor degree, where, as a performer and as a student of music, I took on the creation and composition aspects, being that I and another friend, a student of music production, composed a work for percussion entitled "Esfera" (Sphere) that has, as the name indicates, a spherical spatial format, where the performer is in the center, the audience around it and, surrounding the audience, is a set of multichannel columns (8.1 ) that surrounds all the space around it; in this way, the sound travels in both timbre as in intensity, direction and sensation, through the fusion of the acoustic sound with the electronic sound. It also has as premise the natural layout of the audience in a circle, according to their will. This performative and sensorial experience aroused in me a marked interest in increasing my knowledge in strategies of approaching music to the public. Methodology: I intend to do a brief survey of theses, articles and performances already done to gain a greater insight into the various strategies used to create a closer relationship between the audience and the performative factor. In addition to the above, the largest piece of research content will have to be created by me: both data, concepts, demand and interest in the receptive capacity of a listener will have to emerge from me as a performer. From my research, retention of knowledge and experience as a performer and human being, I intend to create a concept of spectacle where the importance of the natural and sensorial integration / disposition of a public present in a concert is created by itself, giving freedom to the listener of being in any part of the room without its disposition interferes with the quality of its sensations.
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Bach and Numbers: Analysis of His Church Cantatas through Biblical Numerology (2019) Min-ho Jeong
Many years of singing religious texts, especially that of Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), as a counter tenor made me question if there were other methods of interpreting Bach’s music beyond focusing only on musical affects or harmonies. Among the many interpretative methods, I became interested in biblical numerology, interpreting numerical values with religious symbolisms, and was motivated to research the relationship between biblical and musical numeric symbolisms in Bach’s church cantatas. As many of his writings show, Bach’s music is deeply rooted in the Lutheran faith and Protestant traditions and, a detailed biblical approach would serve as one of the many good ways for the performer to deepen his or her understanding of Bach’s music and to enrich the interpretation in performance. The discovery of numeric insights in Bach’s church cantatas helped me better understand and interpret his emotional expressions and depth of faith. I believe this knowledge will be useful for other performers in making a musical interpretation more compelling and communicative. The objective of this research exposition is to suggest biblical numerology as a method to analyze and understand J.S. Bach’s church cantatas and to reveal Bach’s theological intentions by analyzing the correlation between the biblical and musical numeric values found in his solo cantatas for alto (BWV 82, 169) and how they apply in our understanding of the biblical symbolism in the text and the music.
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Introductory Double Bass Method for Children (v2) (2019) Adriana Gutierrez Saldana
Last version of my Research. Name: Adriana Gutierrez Saldaña Main Subject: Classical Double Bass Research Supervisor: Maggie Urquhart Title of Research: Enjoy with Your Bass – Introductory Double Bass method for children Research Question: Is it possible to create an enjoyable introductory Double Bass method for children, which they can use by themselves? Most of the existing double bass methods are not orientated towards children. One of the pioneering methods, written 30 years ago, 'Bass is Best' by Caroline Emery relies on parental help for the children’s practice. My aim was to develop a method that children could use by themselves. Building on my practical experience of teaching children in Spain, using 'El Sistema', I developed and applied a teaching system over the last two years that incorporated this principal. Two of my pupils, using my system, within only three years of playing the double bass were able to play professional level orchestral excerpts. Therefore it is possible to combine technical discipline with creativity and enjoyment playing the instrument. This method is simultaneously a guide for teachers to promote a healthy attitude when creating a musical career both with and without the instrument. However, the role of the double bass teacher is fundamental. The teacher has to have passion, be able to explain the concepts of playing clearly and be able to help the child understand technique without creating pressure. One of the examples in my case study is when the child opens the book to practice after the lesson and he/she cannot remember the theory of the new concepts. My method helps to the student how to overcome a problem by themselves. I created a warm up programme to be used before playing the instrument, which helps to prevent strain and injuries. This also helps body awareness when playing the bass. Practicing these exercises before and after playing ensures that the muscle tissue is warm and elastic, the nerve impulses are faster and the joint fluid flows faster. This means that there is less chance of suffering an injury when playing the instrument. Biography: Adriana Gutierrez Saldaña was born in Salamanca (Spain) in 1994 and began playing the double bass at the age of eight. Five years later, she joined the bass section in youth orchestras making international tours to the present day. She started her bachelor focusing on classical double bass at the Conservatory of Castilla y Leon (Spain) with Joaquin Clemente. She was the first student to receive an Erasmus scholarship from Salamanca to study at the Guildhall School Music and Drama (UK) with Colin Paris and Luis Cabrera. During her bachelor she started teaching beginners on the double bass, was one of the coaches at the Youth Orchestra of Cantabria (Spain), was a volunteer at a “minor centre” and in an orphanage as a teacher in integration programmes.
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Stockhausen's KONTRABASS from ORCHESTER-FINALISTEN: A performative approach (2018) Miguel Moreno Traba
Abstract Name: Miguel Moreno Traba Main Subject: Double Bass Title of Research: The double bass in Stockhausen's LICHT. Archetypes and the role of double bass. How can you shape your interpretation. Research supervisors: Pete Saunders and Cristiano Melli. Research Question: • What is the specific function of the double bass in Orchesten Finalisten? • Sub-questions: How do the different double bass solos in the Licht world compare?. • How should the knowledge of the symbols related to the characters, change the way one performs this piece? Sumary of Results: The objective of this research is to analyse Karlheinz Stockhausen's HALT and KONTRABASS, both pieces from his opera cycle LICHT – Die sieben Tage der Woche. (LICHT – The Seven Days of the Week). The goal is to study how a performer can shape the interpretation of these pieces according with the symbology the composer uses in the cycle. LICHT is a cycle of seven operas, one for each day of the week. There are three main characters or archetypes. Michael, Lucifer and Eve. Each opera in the cycle has a particular symbol, colour and main subject and is named after the days of the week. MONTAG aus LICHT is Eve’s Day; DIENSTAG aus LICHT is the day of Michael and Lucifer’s Confrontation; MITTWOCH aus LICHT is the Day in which they reconciliate and cooperate; DONNERSTAG aus LICHT is Michael’s Day; FREITAG aus LICHT is when Eve is tempted by Lucifer; SAMSTAG is the Fallen Angel Day and, finally, SONNTAG is Michael and Eve’s Mystical Union. All the musical material is based in Stockhausen’s Superformula technique. Each character has a melody (called formula by the composer) written to represent their archetype; all three formulas placed in counterpoint is what is called Superformula. With this study, using the knowledge of LICHT’s symbols and musical construction, we believe that a richer and more accurate performance of HALT and KONTRABASS can be achieved. As result, we hope to bring more interest not only in Stockhausen’s music but also to newly composed music in general. Biography: Miguel studied his Bachelor degree with David Monrabal in Murcia (Spain). After that he went to London to study for a Master in Orchestra with LSO at Guildhall School of Music and Drama in 2015, finishing in 2016. In that year he came to The Hague to do another master at Koninklijk Conservatorium Den Haag. He played as double bass tutti in various professional orchestras and also in youth orchestras. He was principal bass in Murcia youth orchestra from 2010 to 2014, and also play in the Spanish Youth Orchestra (JONDE) (2014). He was principal double bass in the winter tour with the NJO (2018). He is on the reserve list of the Gustav Malher Jugendorchester (2018).
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Pointing out the obvious (2017) Brandt Attema
My main question is: ‘In which ways can I guide a student to improve as a trombone player following the framework of Jan Kagarice?’ My conclusions involve both explanations and exercises, because my research aims on being a practical reference guide for trombone and brass players. The exercises can be used for practice, but could also be examples of how to apply the conclusion in daily practice. In my paper I describe my research process and conclusions. In my presentation I will place an emphasis on the practical use of my findings as a player by presenting the results not only in words but also in live examples by myself. The main outcome of my research is that we need to pay respect to and take in account the individual needs of every student. I have found many tools to guide students to improve their playing and for every student I try to choose the required exercises or words. In relation to my research question, the way to guide the students is to focus on more efficiency and more natural playing. I can guide a student to improve as a trombone player by observing the student to find out it’s individual needs. This observation guides me to choose personalized exercises to help the student play more efficient and natural. By sharing my findings in this paper I hope to create a reference guide for other brass players and teachers. My research consists of four methods: 1. Self-reflection 2. Reflection on my teaching 3. Researching literature 4. Talks and interview
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Historical and contemporary perspectives on the postures and physiological pitfalls of playing the baroque cello (2015) Annabeth Shirley
Name: Annabeth Shirley Main Subject: Baroque Cello Research Coach: Wouter Verschuren Title of Research: Holding the violoncello: Historical and contemporary perspectives on the postures and physiological pitfalls of playing the baroque cello Research Question: How can baroque cellists today prevent occupational injury due to long hours of holding the violoncello in playing position? Are there suggestions from current physiological techniques that can inform and improve how we approach playing the baroque cello? What can the treatises and iconography from the 18th - 20th centuries tell us about holding and playing the cello without an endpin? Summary of Results: When Luigi Boccherini’s body was exhumed in the 1990s, expert analysis concluded that this famous baroque cellist suffered numerous musculoskeletal injuries, many of which were a direct result of his profession. Baroque cello playing had caused skeletal changes in his spine and legs significant enough to still be evident in his mummified body nearly 200 years after his death. Musicians place huge strains on their bodies for the sake of their art, made even more apparent by the condition of Boccherini’s remains. Fortunately, awareness of the physical strain and injury suffered by many musicians is rapidly increasing, and so too have scientific studies, health practitioners, and music teachers augmented the focus on physical health for enabling a lifetime devoted to music. The aim of this paper is to discover suggestions and methods for minimizing physiological harm when playing the cello without an endpin. Of course, there is no one answer, one cure, one ideal posture for baroque cellists. This paper will not present the one best way of holding the cello that will ensure an injury-free, painless career. Rather, this paper will present suggestions, thoughts, and ideas gleaned from an investigation of cello treatises, physiological research, health practitioners, fellow cellists, and iconography. The presentation of this research will include visual examples, written instructions, and physical demonstrations as suggested by the historical sources and contemporary experts. Comparison off the different recommendations will ideally assist fellow baroque cellists in combating the postural tendencies and pitfalls of holding the violoncello. Biography: Originally from Salem, Oregon, USA, Annabeth obtained dual bachelors degrees in Cello Performance and Neuroscience at the University of Michigan in 2012, and a bachelors degree in Baroque Cello from the Koninklijk Conservatorium in 2013. In the past several years she has performed with the Nederlands Kamerkoor, Ars Musica, Symphonie Atlantique, and CaféHaydn. Also a devoted dancer, this summer she will perform a new choreography in which she will both dance and play her cello. She plays an 1830s instrument of most likely French origin.
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research understanding rubato in classical style (2015) Zijun Dandan Wang
The aim of this paper is to explain rubato in the Classical period. Modern piano pedagogues have not defined in detail how to use rubato, or when, where, and why to use it. I have tried to find some answers. Through studying the many classical treatises and modern sources and letters of the great masters or their friends, this paper intends to paint the picture of how rubato is practiced in the late 18th and early 19th century. It includes examples from different composers discussing the different types of rubato as well as tempo markings, slurs, dynamic markings, expressive markings and ornamentations/cadenzas, related to rubato.
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Preparing an opera role (2015) Wendeline van Houten
Wendeline van Houten C010200 Main Subject: Classical Singing Research coach: Gerda van Zelm Title of Research: The interpretation of the role of Fiordiligi from Così fan tutte (KV 588) Research question: How can I best prepare myself for an opera role? Summary of results: To prepare an operatic role is a process that starts with finding available related source material about the opera, the composer, the librettist and the character. Due to the musical practice of the time this opera has been written, it brings one further to gather information about the singer for whom this role was written. It answers questions about how this music has to be performed and be interpreted. Gradually then, the character of the operatic role becomes clearer the interpreter is able to draw the character’s universe according to the method of David Ostwald in Acting for Singers (2005). This helps clarify the opera’s theme, the character’s objectives, subtext, conflicts and enables the performer to apply different facets of the same personality in the various scenes and develop relationships with theatrical props. Now one can work with the complete information in one’s practice. Going through this process gives one profundity in the interpretation. It makes a singer much more attached to the role, the story the era and the formation of the opera. Therewith it clarifies the theme of the opera and subsume it in the era when it was created. It can be useful to deal witch vocal challenges since it gives a singer direction why it was written like it is and what it should sound like.
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FROM SEQUENZA TO... (2015) Matteo Sampaolo
Main Subject: Classical Flute Research Coach: Paul Scheepers Title of Research: FROM SEQUENZA TO... an itinerary in the Italian contemporary music for flute after the theories of Opera Aperta Research Question: Did Berio's Sequenza contribute to create a compositional genre in the Italian flute repertoire? Summary of Results: From its publication in 1958 “Sequenza I” by Luciano Berio has been subject of a lot of studies. How to understand its theatrical emblematic construction and how to develop a good interpretation are questions that every flute player asks himself when he/she approaches that piece for the first time. But Sequenza is not only a milestone in the flute repertoire, in fact is one of the first works quoted by Umberto Eco in his photography of the one main artistic trend born in the last years of fifties, the book “Opera Aperta”. Berio was one of the leading composers, he dedicated Sequenza to the most innovative flute player, Severino Gazzelloni, and they were both part of the most fruitful musical environment of those years, the Ferienkurse of Darmstadt, so a question arises: which other pieces have been written in reply to the provocation launched by Sequenza? This research aim was to find concrete connections in pieces for solo flute written after Sequenza following the concepts described by Eco; while first and second chapter introduce the concepts of Opera Aperta and their evidences in Sequenza, the third looks to the repertoire for solo flute and proof that a real reply to Berio's work does not exist in it; in the last chapter is presented the production of Salvatore Sciarrino, a composer who wrote a lot works for solo flute and whose style is extremely different from Berio's but perhaps the philosophy behind his “Opera per Flauto” is not that far away from the theories of Eco. The presentation of this research will include a power point and some musical samples, recorded as well as played live by me. Biography: Matteo Armando Sampaolo studied flute with Di Tommaso in Pesaro where he was awarded his Diploma with honourable mention. He began his orchestral studies with the Italian Youth Orchestra (OGI) and he participated to the masterclasses of Sir. James Galway, Giampaolo Pretto and Andrea Oliva. He has worked with the Orchestra Cherubini, Orchestra della Toscana, Orchestra del Maggio Musicale Fiorentino and the European Union Youth Orchestra under the batons of Riccardo Muti, Vasily Petrenko and Vladimir Ashkenazy. In 2013 he moved to The Netherlands to study in a Master degree at the Royal Conservatoire of Den Haag with Thies Roorda, where he received a scholarship from the Residentie Orkest for the orchestral Master. Matteo frequently plays as soloist and is a passionate chamber musician.
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The Aria in its context - Sonata form and characterization in two Eighteenth-Century Opere Serie: Mozart's Mitridate and Lucio SIlla (2015) Santo Militello
Name: Santo Militello Main Subject: Music Theory Research Coaches: Paul Scheepers, Bert Mooiman Title of Research: The Aria in its context; Sonata form and characterization in two Eighteenth Century Opera Serie: Mozart’s Mitridate K87/74a (1770) and Lucio Silla K135 (1772) Research Question: Are the principles of Sonata Form present in Mozart’s early Opera- Seria Arias? How do these principles operate? Summary of Results: The musical forms employed by Mozart in the Arias from Mitridate and Lucio Silla are construed by classical literature as examples of Da Capo Aria and its variants, without providing a specific analysis of the thematic layout of the formal sections. The present research is an attempt to reconsider the analytical results of those authors and to propose a more detailed analysis, applying to the afore mentioned vocal works the analytical theories recently developed for the analysis of instrumental repertoire by scholars W. Caplin (Classical Form), J. Hepokoski and W. Darcy (Elements of Sonata Theory). A detailed description which demonstrates how Sonata-form principles operate in these Arias can be found in Part III, with particular focus on the exposition sections. In Part IV we discuss the connection between musical form and dramatic situations: as far as the overall form is concerned, it is not possible to identify a fixed relationship; however, we found that, in the totality of Arias sung by each character, the character alternates different musical forms (with one meaningful exception), and that, in some dramatic situations, the importance of specific roles such as the prima donna, primo uomo and primo tenore are highlighted by the use of musical forms which are, in the stylistic context of these two Operas, exceptional. On the other hand, we recognize a strong relation between musical form and libretto, concerning the details of the different expositional trajectories: through the analysis of proportion and amplitude of expositions, we understand their rhetorical strength; specifically, the way in which the secondary theme space is prepared, presented and developed is construed as a metaphor to portray the character’s utterance, feelings and purposes. Therefore, through a hermeneutic approach, we link the expositional narrative to the expression of heroism, self-confidence, rage, persuasive power and overwhelming emotions. Biography: Santo Militello is born in Verona (Italy) in 1983; he studied in Conservatorio di Musica di Vicenza and Trento, where he earned a Diploma in Choral Conducting (2009), Wind Band Instrumentation (2010) and Composition (2012). In 2012 he moved to the Netherlands, where, in 2013, he obtained a bachelor degree in Music Theory at the Koninklijk Conservatorium Den Haag.
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Musician's Warm-Up (2015) Benjamin Marionneau
Name: Benjamin Marionneau Main Subject: Classical Cello Research Coach: Susan William Title of Research: Musician's Warm-up Research Question: Warming up, why and how? Summary of Results: Like in sport, warming up is the first thing a musician can do before a practice session or a performance. Playing an instrument requires a lot of involvement from the body and the mind, and can be very demanding. Therefore a session of practice or performance needs to be well prepared if the musician needs to play a long time in order to avoid all the problems that he can meet by the demands of practicing and performing. There is no need to spend a very long time on the warm-up, but important to do it in a good way, and in order to succeed in warming up it is good to have some knowledge about why and how to do it. In this presentation, we will approach the warm-up from the physical side and the mental side, without and with instrument. To do so, I will explain and give a few exercises and information that should be relevant for any musician who wishes to improve his knowledge in this field. Biography: Born in 1987, in Poitiers, France. Benjamin Marionneau began playing the cello around 7-8 years old in the music school of Bressuire in France, and then moved to Poitiers where he studied with Marc Benyahia Kouider for almost ten years. He obtained his diplomas of cello and chamber music there in 2005. Then he moved to Paris and studied four years there, first with Henri Demarquette in the conservatory of Saint-Maur-des-Fossés where he obtained diplomas of cello (2006) and chamber music as well (2007), and later in the conservatory of Rueil-Malmaison with Marie-Paule Milone, where he got a "prix d'excellence" (2008). After four years in the Royal Conservatoire in Den Haag he received a Bachelor with Jan-Ype Nota and Michel Strauss as main teachers. He is now studying with Lucia Swarts and Roger Regter in Den Haag. He also participated in masterclasses and received cello lessons with great teachers as Anner Bylsma, Janos Starker, Jerome Pernoo, Xavier Gagnepain, Marc Coppey, Philippe Muller and François Salque, and regularly with Harro Ruijsenaars for the past four years.
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Acquiring the skill of keeping a steady beat as an older beginner (2016) Merit Verbeij
Name: Merit Verbeij Main Subject: Music education according to the Kodaly Concept Research Supervisors: Ewan Gibson and Suzanne Konings Title: Acquiring the skill of keeping a steady beat as an older beginner Research Question: What is steady beat and how can the skill be developed when pupils are “older beginners”? Summary of the results: The steady beat is an ongoing movement in time and is necessary to be able to communicate through the music and to experience the music in all its layers. The development of the skill of keeping a steady beat shows roughly three different stages: awareness of beat, being able to play along with support of an external beat and being able to internalize the beat. In order for the right experience of beat to happen the activities demand beat relating repertoire, movements corresponding with the beat and the right support from the teacher. Biography of the student: Merit Verbeij is a music teacher who lives in Rotterdam and teaches at a Dutch International Primary School. After her BA in Music Education at Codarts, conservatory of Rotterdam she studied the MA in Music Education according to the Kodály Concept at the Royal Conservatory at The Hague.
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Frans Elsen: Harmonic Richness in Solo Jazz Piano Playing (2015) Laurence Fish (older account)
Name: Laurence Fish Main Subject: Jazz Piano Research Coach: Yvonne Smeets Title of Research: Frans Elsen: Harmonic Richness on Solo Jazz Piano Playing Research Question: How does Frans Elsen achieve harmonic richness in his solo piano interpretations of jazz standards and how can I implement aspects of his approach in my own playing? Summary of Results: This research explores the harmonic approach of renowned Dutch jazz pianist, Frans Elsen in his solo performances. Twelve complete transcriptions from his CD 'Live at the Pinehill' were made to form the subject matter. Information most relevant to addressing harmonic weaknesses in my own playing was then identified and analysed. Finally, practice exercises were constructed in order to help me integrate aspects of Elsen's approach into my own playing. The last of these exercises was to arrange the standard 'Close Enough for Love' in the style of Elsen. This arrangement was used in part to gauge the effectiveness of my research process as a whole. Biography: Laurence Fish (London, 1985) began playing piano at the age of 9 and trained as a classical pianist until 2007, when having completed a degree in Psychology and Music from Leeds University, he decided to specialise in Jazz Piano. In 2008 he emigrated to The Netherlands in order to study at the Royal Conservatoire of The Hague where he graduated cum laude in May 2013. He continues to be based in The Hague, where he is currently finishing his Master studies at the same institute as well as working freelance as a teacher and performer.
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The Effects of Non-Musical Attributes on Ratings of High-Level Performances (2015) Sevilya Hendrickx-Lyumanova
Name: Sevilya Hendrickx Main subject: Viola Research coach: Paul Scheepers Title of research: The effects of non-musical attributes on ratings of high-level performances Research question: What are the effects of non-musical attributes on ratings of high-level performances? Summary of Results Quality judgements form a routine part of musical listening. Depending on a particular situation and occasion, such judgements may be more or less formal ranging from a post-concert discussion and a review in the newspaper, to a thoughts expressed in a mark or awarded prize in an examination context. As musicians and music-lovers are focussed on examining the quality of the music their whole productive career, we consider ourselves to be experts at it. But research has shown otherwise, and that even though many of us might be experts at assessing musical quality, we all are liable to biases. This purpose of this study is to determine if judgements of expert musical performances would be affected by non-musical attributes of perceived outspoken appearance of the performance. In the first part of my research existing theories on the subject will be explicated. In the second part of this research an own experiment and its findings will be discussed and in the third part the results will be held against the stories of professional performers and jury members. With this study I hope to broaden the field of research on this subject and enlighten musicians and music reviewers with our human unconscious flaws and biases when it comes to assessing such a complicated matter as high level performances in music. Additionally, the results will be presented in fun way in a Powerpoint presentation. Biography Sevilya was born in Tashkent in a musical family and a mixture of different cultures. Already from a young age Sevilya knew she would like to become a professional musician, so when she was older she studied violin at the Gnesin College and Academy, Moscow. After her study, she wanted to explore more and started playing the viola under her teacher Mikhail Zemtsov. Last summer she finished her Bachelor Cum Laude at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague, is about to finish her Master’s degree and will be performing with the Residentie-Orkest as their newest addition to the viola section.
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How can guitar players combine Jazz and Soul music in their playing? (2016) Daniel Yves Dudok
Jazz and Soul. Guitar players nowadays are busy with combining more styles in their playing. Not innovative. Guitar players like George Benson, Kenny Burrell or Cornell Dupree were playing one particular style, with a litlle bit of an other style. I would like to combine some Soul techniques, accompaniments and solo with some Jazz techniques, accompaniments and solo. Maybe interesting for other guitar players or musicians? That is where I am looking for Main subject: Jazz guitar Master coach: Enno Voorhorst Master circle leader: Yvonne Smeets Teachers: Wim Bronnenberg, Eef Albers Head department: Wouter Turkenburg Royal Conservatory, The Hague Date presentation: 6th of april 2016, 11.30-12.30 At the Royal Conservatory
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The Composer As Producer (2015) Kellen Mc Daniel
Name: Kellen McDaniel Main Subject: Viola Research Coach: Theo Verbey Title of Research: The Composer as Producer: Exploring New Music Technology Research Question: What are some examples of exciting new music technologies and how are they implemented? Summary of Results: Technological advances have resulted in an explosion of new tools for the creation of electronic music. Contemporary classical composer’s usage of new music technology has lagged far behind its rapid development due to longstanding prejudice and hurdles of technical literacy. I have written two contrasting etudes as a jumping off point for the exploration of new music technology developed within the last 5-10 years, fully produced using a wide array of cutting edge software. Documentation included provides insight into the methodology of studio production, as well as scores, MIDI files, and the recordings themselves, which will allow users to jump right in where I left off and see precisely how all results were achieved. The presentation will include a performance of both etudes as well as demonstrations and discussion of the specific techniques utilized in their production. Biography: Kellen McDaniel is a violist and composer from Los Angeles, California. He received his BM in Viola from The Juilliard School in 2013. He is currently pursuing an MM at the Royal Conservatoire of The Netherlands, Den Haag with a particular interest in chamber music and new music technology.
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The Viola da gamba in German Baroque Opera (2015) Susanne Herre
The Holy Roman Empire ('Teutschland'/'Germania') – a loose alliance of more than a thousand territories with its Imperial court in Vienna - was a monstrous complex of political and cultural diversity. Its nobility – Princes, Electors and even the Emperor himself - highly appreciated the viola da gamba as a refined musical instrument, and learning to play it commonly formed part of their education from childhood onwards. Often, they were themselves involved in the preparation of major musical events such as the performances of operas which were the high points of festivities, such as Carnival, birthdays, and name days. While the Viennese court favoured Italian opera and employed a large number of Italian artists, quite a number of Italian and German composers also came into contact with the French style during study visits to Paris or through French colleagues employed at German courts. Thus, Baroque opera in Germany is mainly Italian at heart but also absorbs other elements such as German counterpoint and the French style. To relate the viola da gamba to opera performed in 'Germania' may at first sight seem surprising as we would associate it rather with chamber music and in the case of vocal music mainly with sacred cantatas, especially funeral music. The research process has shown that the viola da gamba indeed played a role in German baroque opera. New discoveries of pieces from operas and opera-like works performed at German courts such as Hanover, Düsseldorf, Dresden and Berlin demonstrate the varied use of the viola da gamba as an obbligato instrument, solo or in combination with other instruments, and as basso continuo instrument.
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Trombonists: Hazards o the Road (2015) Pete Saunders
Name: Pete Saunders Main subject: Classical trombone Research coach: Susan Williams Title of research: Trombonists: Hazards on the Road Research Question: What are the causes of playing crises in trombone playing, and what are the possible courses of action in response? Summary of Results: In their professional careers many trombonists encounter serious playing problems. This research has sought to find some of the causes and some of the possible actions to take in response. Through an extensive questionnaire and interviews with experts a number of ideas were found concerning the possible causes and various means to help those in crisis. It was found that it is important in the first years: to have free choice of instrument, to start playing and receiving lessons early, to have support in the decision to attend higher education in music. In the years of study it is important, among other things, to establish good practice habits, including an early start and more than one warm-up per day. A maximum of 4 hours practice per day and one free day per week are recommended. During the professional years discipline remains essential, and teaching trombone is strongly associated with not developing problems. Recommendations from the experts interviewed include: place focus on the music, never on the physical problems; always keep learning; let go of patterns and judgements; increase your awareness through breathing; be open and honest; stay in contact with yourself. Biography Pete Saunders began his career in Mexico. After two years in Germany he settled in the Netherlands where he has lived and performed for the last thirty-five years, including twenty-six years in the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra. For fifteen years he was the trombonist of the famed Netherlands Wind Ensemble, and also performed with all the contemporary music ensembles of the Netherlands. Pete Saunders started teaching at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague in 1991. He has also taught and given masterclasses in Portugal, Germany and Israel. Many former students are trombonists in the orchestras of this country and abroad.
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Master Research Paper - Yoga Without the Mat (2015) Elizabeth Marr
Main Subject: Classical Flute Research Coach: Andrew Wright Research questions: - What elements of Hatha yoga are beneficial to flute playing? - How can I adapt and present elements of Hatha Yoga to create a practical teaching/practice resource that can be used by myself, other flautists and teachers of all levels to improve posture, breathing and flute playing in general? Summary of Results: Yoga has long been known for its far reaching benefits, not only physically but spiritually. Translated it means: union of body and mind, and even from this translation one can immediately make connections with the aspirations of a musician. As musicians, our goal is to perform to the best of our abilities, requiring us to perfect the unification of our body (technique) and mind (musical intentions). My research has delved deeper into this already formed link, however focusing on its particular relevance to flautists. Why? For one main reason. My research is based on Hatha Yoga and two of its eight limbs (elements) are asanas (physical postures) and pranayama (breath control). Posture and breathing are at the core of every flautists technique, with both having equal influence on the sound produced, more so than any other instrument. In this presentation we shall explore these two limbs as I have, and whether specific asanas and pranayama exercises can be shown to be particularly beneficial to flautists. As a flautist who has been struggling with negative comments on posture for years, yoga has been a revelation for me and I wanted to bring this to others, however making it more accessible, relevant and easy for anyone to include as part of their practice. Additionally we shall look into the three other limbs my research covered: pratyahara (withdrawal of the senses from objects); dharana (concentration); and niyama (observances) and how my general day-to-day life and practice as a flautist and musician has improved through my research of them. Biography: Elizabeth Marr, born in Aberdeen, graduated with a First Class Honours BMus Degree and LTCL with Distinction from TrinityLaban CMD in London (2013) studying flute with Anna Noakes, Margaret Campbell and Alan Baker (piccolo). She is currently completing her Masters at the KonCon studying with Thies Roorda and Dorine Schade (piccolo). Recently Elizabeth has won a place on the extra list for Principal Flute with the Birmingham Royal Ballet Orchestra, performed with the AKOM Ensemble, Camerata Scotland alongside the Hebrides Ensemble and the International Opera Theatre company (premiering opera Camille Claudel). Recent masterclasses include with Peter-Lukas Graf and Emily Beynon.
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Bach Reconstructed (2015) Michael Peterson
Name: Michael Peterson Main Subject: Harpsichord Research Coach: Kathryn Cok Title of Research: Reconstructing Bach Research Question: How can one deliver a compelling performance of a work by Johann Sebastian Bach for which only a fragment exists? Summary of Results: Two pieces - the Flute Sonata in A major and the Art of the Fugue - remain among Johann Sebastian Bachʼs most mysterious and rarely performed works today. Part of the reason why may come from the way this music has been preserved. The flute sonata was written on the same autograph manuscript as Bachʼs Concerto for Two Keyboards in C minor, but part of this manuscript has been cut off, leaving us with over 40 measures of the flute sonata missing. Bachʼs death in 1750 prevented him from publishing in its entirety one of his most complex movements from the Art of the Fugue: Contrapunctus 14. Fortunately, breakthroughs in modern scholarship, together with inspiration from reconstructive processes in other genres, make it possible to develop appropriate reconstructions of these pieces. The music can then be made suitable for performance and more accessible to todayʼs audiences. This presentation will show the methods and strategies I used to reconstruct these two pieces, along with the challenges I faced, and will feature a performance of both works. Biography: Michael Peterson has performed nationally and internationally as a soloist and chamber musician. His repertoire spans nearly five hundred years, with an emphasis on music from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Recently, he has performed with Gabrieli West, the Pacific Chamber Symphony, and American Bach Soloists. He is now pursuing a diploma at the Royal Conservatoire of The Hague, where he studies harpsichord with Jacques Ogg and basso continuo with Patrick Ayrton.
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The Second Violin Concerto of Béla Bartók (2015) Huba Hollókői
Name: Huba Hollókői Main Subject: National Master Orchestral Conducting Research Coach: Theo Verbey Titel of Research: The Second Violin Concerto of Béla Bartók Research Question: How much do we know about the genesis of Béla Bartók’s Second Violin Concerto, and in what extent did the collaboration between composer, soloist and conductor influenced the compositional process – final form of the piece? Summary of Results: Following the flow of letters exchanged between the composer, Béla Bartók and Zoltán Székely, who was not only the dedicatee of the piece, the soloist of the premier, but played a more versatile rule as motivator, also helped the composer with his advises, an interesting documentary we can find of the 1930’s in Europe. An analysis of the score of Willem Mengelberg, the conductor of the premier, provides us with some practical details of the working style of the Maestro. With the help of a power point presentation and some musical examples, I will present a brief analysis of the piece and it’s genesis. Biography: Huba Hollókői is completing his last year of the National Master Orchestra Conducting program of the Royal Conservatoire of The Haag and the Conservatory of Amsterdam. With NMO, he has assisted Stefan Asbury with Noord Netherlands Orchestra, Christoph Poppen with Het Gelders Orkest, and Kenneth Montgomery with Irish National Orchestra and The Belfast Philharmonic. He was finalist of the 53rd Besancon Conducting Competition in 2013. He conducted orchestras Finland, Holland, Denmark, Hungary, Slovakia, Germany, USA and Mexico. His teachers include Jac van Steen, Ed Spanjaard, Kenneth Montgomery, Atso Almila, and Yuri Simonov.
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Cello Playing in Early-18th Century Britain (2015) Ester Domingo Sancho
Name: Ester Domingo Sancho Main subject: Oud-Barokcello Research coaches: Bart van Oort, Job ter Haar Title of Research: Cello playing in early 18th-century Britain. Research Question: Was there any school of cello playing during the first half of the 18th century in England? And in that case how far did the Italian Violoncellists influence the practice of cello playing in the 18th-century England and how this reflects in the repertoire for the instrument? Summary of Results: During the 17th century in England, the violin family instruments were considered by many of the noblemen and royalty as the instrument of pubs, village parties and fair-musicians. But, with the London performances of Italian and French cellists during the 30s of the 18th century, the popularity of the cello as a solo instrument grew considerably. Anyway, the cello, the bass instrument of the violin family, was built and played in England some years before that happened. It was designated with a different name (bass violin) and built in a different length than our modern standard but I believe it is still the same instrument. In this paper we will explore the terminology for the cello in Britain and I will try to proof that a bass violin is actually a cello by comparing the characteristics of some instruments made in England during the late 17th and 18th century, and paintings of the time. I will go also through the music and cello methods written and published in London for solo cello during the 18th century and I will analyze for what kind of musician was that music targeting, and what are the common characteristics of it. The presentation will include musical examples. Pictures and photos of instruments will be shown on a screen through a PowerPoint presentation. Biography: She began her musical studies at the age of eight in her hometown. She studied in the Conservatorio Superior de Aragón (CSMA) from 2006 to 2010. During 2011/12 she was a member of the JOA, a youth orchestra specialized in the performance practice of classical and romantic music with period instruments. In 2013 she finished a master degree at the Folkwang Universität der Künste in Essen, Germany, with Professors Alexander Hüllshof and Uli Witteler. Since September 2013 she studies a master's degree in Early Music at the Royal Conservatory of The Hague, under the guidance of Prof. Jaap ter Linden with a scholarship generously granted by the government of her city. She is a member of the Age of Enlightenment Orchestra Experience 2015.
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The “Weiss Theorbo”: Sylvius Leopold Weiss and his continuo instrument in the Hofkapelle of Dresden (2015) Giulio Quirici
Name: Giulio Quirici Main Subject: Lute Research Coaches: Kate Clark Title of Research: The “Weiss Theorbo”: Sylvius Leopold Weiss and his continuo instrument in the Hofkapelle of Dresden Research Question: What kind of theorbo did Weiss use during his post as a luteninst in the Dresden court? Summary of Results: The theorbo used by Weiss in his Dresden years was not a standard theorbo, although it might have looked just like one. By 1723 Weiss had modified one of his instruments for the use in the orchestra and the church so to resemble in the effect the standard theorbo, but with a different tuning, that mirrored the tuning of the lute of that time (now referred to as “baroque lute”). This lute-like tuning, while still retaining in the power and resonance of the standard theorbo, allowed the "new" instrument a bigger extension both in the high and low registers, and a strong connection to the aesthetic and techniques of the lute. In the context of my own exploration, description and re-introduction of this lesser-known type of theorbo, both practical and theoretical, this thesis aims to also support my claim that Weiss' theorbo is often the most appropriate instrument to realize a 18th Century basso continuo in a historically accurate way. Biography: Giulio Quirici studied jazz and baroque music. He is a co-founder of Radio Antiqua, winner of both jury’s and public’s prices at the Haendel Competition in Goettingen. He tours extensively and performed at some of the foremost European festivals including Innsbrucker Festwocken Der Alten Musick, Grachten Festival, Festival d’Ambronay, Pavia Barocca, Bruges MA among the others; played under the direction of Frans Bruggen, Milos Valent, Charles Toet, Vox Luminis, and can be heard in upcoming CD releases by Pan Classics, Glossa and Harmonia Mundi. Giulio serves as a music teacher at the British School in the Netherland since 2011.
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Verwey, Erik - Research Paper - Forgotten Fingers (2015) Erik Verwey
RESEARCH ABSTRACT Name: Erik Verwey Main Subject: Piano, jazz Research Coach: Bert Mooiman Title of Research: ‘Forgotten Fingers, analytic research on fingerings in jazz piano music without frustration of improvisation concepts’ Research Question: In what way can fingerings be useful for playing jazz without frustration of improvisation concepts? Summary of Results: It is irrefutable not to think about fingerings when playing piano. Fingers have to touch the keys to produce sound. Simply said when playing piano, a pianist is applying a fingering. It can be very useful to think more conscious about fingerings in jazz piano music. Anatomically and biomechanically seen, some research has been done on finger strength and positions. Nevertheless, the results are not spectacular. No therapist could be found with a very clear vision on anatomic reasons for certain fingerings. Only some schools that favour more flexing fingers are opposed to the ‘flat finger school’. Indeed, forceful playing requires more flexion. Fast playing might be easier with flatter extended fingers. There is not a very ‘common ground’ among jazz pianists that thinking about fingerings is very important or not. Even though some older style pianists like Art Tatum had made up some theories and techniques on fingerings. All the contemporary pianists that were interviewed for this research had different thoughts on feeling and strength. Most importantly, these elements have the greatest effect on the sound the pianist wants to create. However a fertile ground for learning to play more economically (no unnecessary movements of the hand/fingers) and secure jazz piano can be made by thinking clearly about fingerings. Practising exercises like descending pentatonic runs, lines, thirds, double grips and so forth have proven to be useful to ban unnecessary movements of the hand. To aim for strong fingers on strong notes on strong moments in the bar can be effective to create an economic way of playing. This basis is very practical as material to proceed on. Proceed in a way that improvisation concepts would not be frustrated. In the end every pianist has to create his own favourite fingering for his desired feel and, most importantly, preferred sound. The research results in a collection of pianistic exercises in order to play and think more consciously of fingerings in jazz improvisation music. The presentation will include a look at different fingering theories and a demonstration of exercises. Biography: Erik Verwey (Arnhem, 1987) is a jazz pianist and has (a.o) studied with Bert van den Brink, Peter Beets and Juraj Stanik. He finished his bachelor of music with honours at the Conservatory of Utrecht. In 2015 he will finish his master study at the Royal Conservatory of the Hague. Erik is mainly active as jazz pianist, however a big focus lies o playing in theatre. He composes songs for prize winning Dutch singer/ comedian Louise Korthals with whom he is touring around Holland for three years now.
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Sound and harmonic possibilities of guitar. In pursuit of my own sound on guitar and of a wider independence in music performance through the study of classical guitar technique and repertoire. (2016) Davide Zambon
Name: Davide Zambon Main Subject: Jazz Guitar Research supervisor: Enno Voorhorst Title of Research: Sound and harmonic possibilities of guitar. In pursuit of my own sound on guitar and of a wider independence in music performance through the study of classical guitar technique and repertoire. Research Question: How can the study of classical guitar technique and repertoire contribute in helping me reach a personal sound on guitar, broaden my harmonic possibilities, and develop the music independence I’m aiming at in music performance? Summary of Results: The study of classical guitar technique and repertoire can be a source of inspiration for a contemporary guitarist and improviser when working on finding a personal sound, broadening the harmonic possibilities, and accessing the full polyphonic potential of the instrument through the use of the right hand fingers. The research is therefore an investigation into three aspects of classical guitar which I consider being of particular interest for these purposes: the use of open strings within a chord structure or scale, the independence of the thumb from the other fingers of the right hand in its melodic and rhythmic function, and natural and ‘extended natural harmonics’. My conclusion is that a process of learning and developing these aspects can be of strong enrichment for musicians aiming at finding a personal sound and music identity, and consequently making them more suited to diverse music contexts both inside and outside the jazz and improvised music area. Biography: Davide Zambon (Valdagno, Italy, 1991) is a guitarist, improviser, and composer mainly involved in jazz and improvised music. Since 2012 he has been living in the Netherlands, studying at the Royal Conservatory of the Hague, where he graduated with a bachelor degree in jazz guitar. Since then he has been performing as a leader of his trio, as well as a sideman in various other projects. In 2015 he was given the chance to go to the Rhythmic Music Conservatory of Copenhagen as an exchange student, where he performed and came in contact with its vibrant improvised music scene.
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Plunge into Performance Anxiety (2015) Ginette Puylaert
Name: Ginette Puylaert; Research Coaches: Esther van Fenema, Susan Williams; Main Subject: Classical singing; Circle Leader: Gerda van Zelm; Title of Research: Plunge into Performance Anxiety Research Question: How can a personal ‘mind flow’ be translated to an assignment on stage? and to what extent do my nerves relate to the connection I have with the audience and my ensemble? Summary of Results: Soprano Ginette Puylaert began her research together with an ensemble to make interventions on stage as a way to cope with performance anxiety (PA). Interventions are physical or theatrical coping strategies, which can be used on stage to decrease PA. Ginette tried to create a confidential environment where there could be freely spoken about PA-related issues and to experiment with these. Through questionnaires and meetings they shared their information. The ensemble was supposed to consist solely of musicians with PA, but due to circumstances the ensemble became a mixed group of musicians with and without PA. It never came to the process of developing interventions on stage. The musicians without PA often treated the questions and meetings in a humoristic way, which decreased the sense of a confidential environment. Also, in general the ensemble lacked of cooperation, the meetings took place during rehearsals. This project could only work if all musicians joined voluntarily and worked with full commitment. Stage one ended with a concert where Ginette individually experimented with the term ‘vulnerability’ using interaction with the audience and ensemble. The recital was received as an artistic and personal performance. In the next stage Ginette using coping strategies within different ensembles and analyzed thirteen concerts using pre- and after concert questionnaires. Her hypothesis was that her nerves would decrease when her connection with the audience and ensemble was stronger, but the results indicated the opposite concerning connection with the audience. The connection with the ensemble did decrease her nerves, but not significantly. Next to that she became more objective towards her nerves as she was analyzing them, noticing that they didn’t vary much throughout her concerts. One concert was considered an outlier, as her level of nervousness was extremely low. She had to support a sick colleague, which might have forced her into the role of a rescuer, with a positive effect on her nervousness. This research helped to develop the original format for the PA ensemble project. Future plans are to realize this project. Biography: Soprano Ginette Puylaert studied with Lenie van den Heuvel during her Bachelor of Music at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague and graduated in 2013. She continued her master in The Hague with the same teacher. In the summer of 2014 Ginette participated in the Lucerne Festival Academy where she performed with young international musicians ‘Coro’ by L. Berio conducted by Sir Simon Rattle. In 2013 Ginette joined the Britten-Pears Young Artiste Programme where she sang the role of 2nd Woman in Purcell’s Dido & Aeneas. She also sang in master classes by Jard van Nes and Meinard Kraak.
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Programme notes (2015) Tim Sabel
Name: Tim Sabel Main Subject: Classical Piano Research Coaches: Stefan Petrovic, Renee Jonker Title of Research: Programme notes - research in programme notes that colours the experience of a classical concert Research Question: What kind of programme notes can help to colour the experience of a classical concert? Summary of Results: Programme notes can play a key role in making a classical concert more attractive to the audience. Often I read informative programme notes at concerts, while putting the music in an artistic and historical perspective can give a larger view on the music. Also, experiential programmes note can capture the imagination, so the audience may have an association with the music they are listening to. For a musician, it is very important to be aware of your audience since an audience is important to keep (classical) music alive. Writing programme notes forces the musician to do research in the repertoire and helps to give an overview of the piece. In this research I wrote three different programme notes for Miroirs bij Maurice Ravel that I played for an audience. The audience gave their opinion by a questionnaire and indicated how the programme notes influenced the experience of the concert. This research paper and my presentation will show how the programme notes coloured the experience of the concert. Biography: Tim Sabel (’90) finishes the Master Classical Piano as a student of Ellen Corver at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague this year. Tim performs as a soloist and in various duos and ensembles, where he often plays modern music. He played compositions of Reich, Andriessen and Martland during the Dutch Youth Orchestra Summer Academy and recently he played the Three Pieces For Two Piano’s by Ligeti. Tim followed a Minor Music Theory, frequently makes arrangements and has an interest in improvising. Tim is part of Orkest Morgenstond, which has the goal to make the residents of the district Morgenstond in The Hague familiar with classical music.
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Between West and East, classical and traditional music. How should a modern percussionist approach early percussion playing? (2016) Marianna Soroka
Name: Marianna Soroka Main subject: percussion Research supervisor: Peppie Wiersma Research title: Between West and East, classical and traditional music. How should a modern percussionist approach early percussion playing? Research question: How should a modern percussionist approach early percussion playing? Summary: Interested in historical performance, I decided to try to answer some questions I have been dealing with since I started playing early music on percussion. Instruments and techniques, improvisation and lack of music scores, finally – occasions and places where percussion was used: the analysis of all these elements brought me straight to traditional music of Spain. Biography: Marianna Soroka (born in Poznań, Poland) started her musical education playing piano and singing in a choir. Currently living in The Netherlands, she is finishing her studies at The Royal Conservatory in The Hague, focusing on contemporary, Latin and baroque percussion. Marianna is a member of Mitomani multistyle folk group, the winner of the Simcha Prize for the most promising band at the International Jewish Music Fesival in Amsterdam (2014). She also collaborates with groups such as Slagwerk Den Haag and LUDWIG.
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research on ornamentation for baroque trumpet (2016) Rudolf Weges
Name: Rudolf Weges Main Subject: Baroque Trumpet Research Supervisor: Kate Clark Title of Research: How to play ornaments in the late 18th century on baroque trumpet Research Question: What are the possibilities and non-possibilities for ornaments on the baroque trumpet according to Leopold Mozart’s book “A treatise on the fundamental principles of violin playing”? Summary of Results: The baroque trumpet has many technical restrictions compared with the violin. Not all notes can be played on the baroque trumpet, this is because the baroque trumpet has only the notes of its own overtone series, so not all the chromatic/diatonic notes can be played. Therefore one can also not play in all the keys and notes in diatonic sequence can only be produced in the highest “clarino” register. It is also questionable whether a (brass) wind instrument with its fixed mouth piece and limits on articulation because of this can hope to imitate the many delicate possibilities for articulation and sound achievable on the violin with its strings and many bowing techniques. The baroque trumpet also had a complete different function. It was first a ceremonial instrument and war instrument. It is likely that in these functions they weren’t suspected to add ornamentation to their music. As trumpeters’ skills improved, they started to play in the higher “clarino” register. So later the trumpet became an instrument of Art. How to play ornaments in Leopold Mozart’s concerto for clarino? And how to interpret the ornaments written in his treatise for the violin on the natural/baroque trumpet? was one of my main questions. Besides Leopold Mozarts treatise I also did research on Tartini’s “treatise on ornaments in music” and “On playing the flute” by Quantz. I do now better understand how to interpret the written ornaments and how to play them. Some ornaments you don’t see, as far as I know, in the trumpet literature. Are they impossible to play? Not all, but also not easy, mostly it could be possible in the clarino register. But it also depends on how the composers wrote for the trumpet. Biography: Rudolf Weges is an all-round professional trumpeter. He studied classical trumpet at the Conservatoire in Groningen, where he also studied conducting. Rudolf continued his studies at the Utrechts Conservatoire, where he studied jazz trumpet. He studied baroque trumpet with Susan Williams at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague but he had also private lessons with Friedemann Immer, and has given performances as both soloist and orchestral player with the Kölner Barockorchester, the Hamburger Barockorchester, Concerto Barocco, Cappella Maria Barbera and Gelders Bach Collegium. Rudolf’s playing career to date has let him to perform in a wide variety of styles as a soloist and in numerous orchestras. As such, he has toured throughout the whole of Europe as well as performing in Canada, Tasmania and New Zealand. His playing experience has encompassed baroque and symphony orchestras, bigbands, wind orchestras, musicals, pop, funk and jazz.
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Shapes in Jazz Harmony: Tension and Release (2015) Rokas Jaunius
Name: Rokas Jaunius Main Subject: Jazz Saxophone Research Coach: Yvonne Smeets Title of Research: Shapes in Jazz Harmony: Tension and Release Research Question: How can I connect triads using the tritone key as an application method to create tension and release? Summary of Results: I started with a simple idea that I came up with by listening to some of my favourite musicians like Michael Brecker, Eric Alexander, Kenny Garrett, Brad Mehldau and many others. I noticed that a lot of interesting harmony movements they used were utilizing symmetrical structures that were using tritone, major 3rd and minor 3rd intervals so I decided to try and combine various shapes in these intervals. While not having a deep understanding of harmony I realized that I have to explore this topic and therefore i started to explore the possible applications of a shape that I found to be appealing for my exploration - the triad. This piece of work is going to focus on the possible applications of the triad shape in jazz harmony utilizing topics like "Reinterpretation" And "Tritone Key". A couple of common harmony movements are going to be explored with possible triad combinations in tritone, major 3rd and minor 3rd intervals. And a couple of etudes to display an actual result that was achieved by utilizing this method. The chosen format is a Research Paper. Due to some technical difficulties i was unfortunately unable to record the audio examples for this presentation, but instead they are going to be performed live in the presentation that is going to take place on March 25th 2015. Biography: Hello, my name is Rokas Jaunius. I am currently studying Jazz Saxophone in the Royal Conservatory of the Hague in the 2nd year of masters. I also finished a bachelor here in The Hague and a Bachelor in the Lithuanian Music and Theatre Academy. Alongside of studying and researching I also perform actively as a Jazz performer.
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Pietà, learning, performing and growing with a piece _ RC EDIT (2019) Valentin Françios
At 22h26, on Easter Saturday, march the 30th 1991, by a full Moon, Karlheinz Stockhausen finished composing the piece Pietà, for quarter tone Flugelhorn, Soprano and electronic music. This piece is something very special. It is difficult to compare it to any of the regular repertoire that trumpet player, even new music specialist are used to learn and to perform. Only a few trumpet players ( six to my knowledge up to today, without me) have taken this challenge. I am profoundly convinced that this piece is only at the beginning of it’s life, and is going to be perform way more often, by a lot of different players in the future. I hope that what I am presenting in this document will help the future generations of courageous musicians who will embark upon the journey that this piece is. Any musician that would like to go on the road with this piece should thus ask himself: What does it take, to learn and perform Pietà?
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From Song to Rhythm Notation (2016) Anouk Vinders
About this exposition Two years ago I visited music lessons in the Kodály Iskola in Kecskemét (Hungary). While I was sitting in the back of the classroom, twenty-five children (age 7) walked in while singing a song. During the music lesson all the children sang in tune, were continuously involved, were motivated to sing on their own and were enjoying the class. I was impressed about the way these children were making music. They performed music with quality and care. The children were reading music almost at the same level as they read and write language. In this school, music lessons belong to the regular curriculum and are as normal as mathematics or history. There, music belongs to the development of the human being. In what way is the music teacher teaching these children, so that they became this highly-skilled in music? And could this way of teaching music be adapted to other countries, for example to the Netherlands? In this research I would like to find answers for suitable musical repertoire, teaching strategies, methodology and teaching tools to develop a sequence for teaching rhythm notation. Biography Anouk Vinders graduated from the Bachelor of Music Education in 2013 (Codarts, Rotterdam). From 2013 she was a music teacher at different primary schools in Rotterdam and The Hague. From 2014 till 2016 she studied at the Master of Music Education according to the Kodály Concept (Royal Conservatoire, The Hague).
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The Piccolo Flute: a Storyteller through Zephyrus Voice (2016) Ana Catarina Da Silva Costa
Name: Ana Catarina da Silva Costa Main Subject: Orchestra Master – Flute and Piccolo Research Supervisor: Susan Williams Title of Research: The Piccolo Flute: A Storyteller through Zephyrus Voice Research Question: An Artistical Approach to (re)discover the Piccolo Flute Summary of Results: The use of Fairy Tales or Myths is often used in psychoanalysis to represent the psyche. The research project about the Piccolo Flute, presented in this Research Paper, was developed in order to tell a story through the music, exploring its sounds and techniques, and creating sound metaphors to express emotions. Zephyrus, the west wind God, blows different kinds of wind and can be used as archetypes for many emotional states and affects. This artistic approach to (re) discover the Piccolo Flute is a storytelling that pretends to express some of the Zephyrus emotions and simultaneously show some of the Piccolo sound resources. Biography: Ana Catarina Costa began her flute studies at the age of 12 with Ana Maria Ribeiro in her hometown conservatoire – Aveiro, Portugal, continuing her studies with Felix Renggli in the Musik-Akademie Basel. Since 2014 she is Orchestra Master student in the Royal Conservatoire The Hague, working with Jeroen Bron and Dorine Schade. During the past few years she regularly performs as a chamber music and orchestral player, working with conductors such as Vladimir Ashkenazy, Valery Gergiev or Kent Nagano. Ana Catarina was invited in October 2015 for a trial as Solo Piccolo in the Gothenburg Symphonic Orchestra in Sweden.
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Tierkreis-The music of the stars (2016) Nerea Vera
How to play Tierkreis convincing Stockhausen
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Research Report (2015) Antreas Yerolatsitis
Name: Antreas Yerolatsitis Main Subject: Jazz Guitar Research Coach: Jarmo Hoogendijk Title of Research: Michael Brecker out playing analysis Research Question: What are the ways and formulas that Michael Brecker uses to play out of the harmonic information of a certain chord or chord progression and how can I adopt them in my own improvisation. Summary of Results: Michael Brecker as jazz saxophonist is well known for his abilities to improvise over different styles of jazz with wide musical chops. He is able to improvise melodically and technically, in a way that keeps the listener interested in his soloing built up and direction. Already, from his first years on the jazz music scene, he showed himself to be a player with identity in his sound and a style of playing that is almost impossible to be confused with that of other saxophone players. For my research report, I focused on researching the “Michael Brecker out playing”, which is certainly one of his strongest and more characteristic chops emerging from his improvisations. The way I chose to examine the ways he does this is by transcribing two of his improvisations in modal and wide harmonically compositions. I focused on the out playing fragments from his improvisation and I tried to classify them into five specific categories. Those categories clearly show and explain the concept behind the harmonic movement that he chose to improvise on. During my research progress, I understood in depth how Brecker approaches the out playing technique in his solos. I gained very interesting and useful ideas on how I can enrich my improvisations with these techniques and transform my playing in a more interesting and sophisticated way. I tried to use the same fragments at first and subsequently find my own musical phrases/lines or sequences based on the Brecker methods. My presentation will include some of the examples from my transcriptions accompanied by actual parts from his solos from the recordings. Finally, I will present my final result by improvising with a live performance and with a prepared solo that will include all the techniques that I discovered, analyzed and adopted during my research work. Biography: Antreas Yerolatsitis is a Cypriot Jazz Guitar player. He was born in 1988 in Nicosia, Cyprus.At the age of 6 he started classical piano lessons in a music school in Nicosia, that was in a collaboration with the London's Royal School of Music. At the age of 15, he had his first guitar studies, also classical. From the age of 16 - 20 he had rock/blues guitar and modern music theory lessons. In that period he played rock/pop music with different bands in Cyprus in weekly basis. In 2009 he started his studies at the Royal Conservatoire.
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Polish Vocal Baroque Music (2016) Aldona Bartnik
This research paper work is dedicated to Polish Vocal Baroque Music. I divide my work into two main sections that I find as an essential elements of education process. The first one is typical academic work, based mostly on reading all the collected materials, while the second part is method concerns my own artistic work. Promotion and indication the high quality music from Poland are the main objects of this research, where I focus on interplay between European countries and Poland. In a progress of my explorations I describe most commonly used music styles easily found in the eastern compositions. Also biographies and chosen sacred works by Polish composers are presented here. These pieces of information are preceded by giving the very essential information about social and historical background. This step makes clearer the general point of view into subject. The second section of my research is an effect of artistic work within my Master Course. It concerns mostly cooperation with the Wrocław Baroque Ensemble with whom I have recorded CD’s and performed lot of Polish repertoire form Baroque. The method contains also organizational work that was done for preparing concerts promoting Polish music in the Netherlands. As a result of this research I have discovered influences from the Western Europe that had an impact on Polish Music. It was surprisingly much more European roots in Poland, than I had suspected before I started my exploration. I have also realized how valuable is history of music in early ages in Poland and how easily visible is high quality of Polish music. All these conclusion approached me to give more mature performances based on deeper understanding of general situation in the European music in Baroque era.
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The classical music concert experience (2015) Vincent van Wijk
Name: Vincent van Wijk Main Subject: Classical Oboe Research Coaches: Gerard Bouwhuis, Renee Jonker Title of Research: The classical music concert experience Research Question: What are the differences between the classical and pop performance practice of today and which aspects of pop music can we incorporate into the classical music concert performance practice? Summary of Results: It is a fact that classical concert venues are having a hard time filling their halls. In the past decades, there has been an increasing criticism of the way classical music performances are currently given. The image of classical music has resulted in audiences finding it ‘dull’ and the classical concert experience perceived as ‘too stiff’. Has it always been like this? In this research you will discover an answer as to why and how the classical music concert experience has changed, why the range of people who have access to (classical) music increased during the past few centuries and how we ended up having multiple genres in the 20th century; including the ‘rise’ of pop music. We will take a look at why this genre is becoming so popular and we will start to analyze the differences between pop and classical music concerts. I created a questionnaire, which was filled in by 58 performing musicians, both classical and pop. After analyzing the answers, I had a clear overview of which aspects are typical pop music-esque and which are typical classical music elements. Subsequently, I developed three different formats of classical music concerts, I went to the shopping mall and played the same oboe solo piece in three different formats: traditional classical concert, semi-traditional classical concert and a more interactive concert. Throughout this experiment I recorded the number of audience members for each separate type of concert, the results of which added another element of interest. The presentation will include background information, the interesting results of both the questionnaire and the shopping mall experiment (including movies) and a conclusion regarding my point on view on this topic, which shall be shown via a PowerPoint presentation. Biography: Vincent van Wijk (1990) completed his Bachelor studies with Ali Groen and Alexei Ogrintchouk cum laude in 2013. Now he is studying in the second year of the Master at the Royal Conservatoire of The Hague with Karel Schoofs and Alexei Ogrintchouk. He followed numerous masterclasses with Maurice Bourgue, Stefan Schilli, Hansjorg Schellenberger, Bart Schneemann and private lessons with Frank de Bruine, Remco de Vries, Lucas Macias Navarro, Dominik Wollenweber in Berlin. Vincent often plays in professional orchestras and ensembles such as the Rotterdam Philharmonisch Orkest, Nederlands Kamer Orkest, Nederlands Philharmonisch Orkest, Brussels Philharmonic (principal oboe) and the Residentie Bach Orkest. Besides oboist, Vincent is a frequently asked orchestra manager. He organises around 8 projects a year, throughout the Netherlands.
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How to become the ultimate sideman as a jazz drummer? (2016) Eric Ineke
Name: Eric Ineke Subject: Jazz Drums Research Supervisor: Rein de Graaff Title of Research: How to become the Ultimate Sideman Abstract In 2009 I started writing my book 'The Ultimate Sideman', which was published in 2012. So when later given the opportunity to undertake a Masters Research project, I immediately knew my research question: "How does one to become the ultimate sideman as a jazz drummer?" This is not an easy question, and I think that in my book the answer is hidden behind the story. The main part of my book consists of two long interviews I did with the American soprano/tenor saxophonist and educator, David Liebman. Prior to these interviews I wrote roughly one hundred portraits of the musicians I've played with and the experiences I've had with them both on and off stage. I sent these writings to David, who used them to compile some very interesting questions on which we based the interviews. The first interview was conducted in 2009 and the second in 2010. Alongside the interviews, all of my portraits were also published in the book. From these interviews/conversations emerged the topics of influences, awareness of certain styles, the quarter note groove, interaction, and how to deal as a drummer with different soloist's varying approaches to the time-feel. I wrote this book especially for young and upcoming jazz drummers/students to give them some insight into real life situations through the eyes of an experienced drummer/sideman. There are hundreds of books written with great drum exercises, and I felt that another book of exercises would not add anything more to what is already available on the market. In order to collect extra feedback and to have points of comparison from the careers of my drummer colleagues, I also conducted interviews with two other well-known ultimate sidemen, Adam Nussbaum from New York and Joe LaBarbera from Los Angeles. These two interviews can be found in appendices i and ii. Biography Eric Ineke started his career in the sixties. Drummers like Philly Joe Jones and Elvin Jones were his inspiration. In 1969 he made his first record with Ferdinand Povel. From the seventies on Eric played in the legendary Rein de Graaff/Dick Vennik Quartet, The Ben van den Dungen/Jarmo Hoogendijk Quintet and The Piet Noordijk Quartet. During his career he recorded numerous CD’s and toured with many great American jazz musicians like Dexter Gordon, Johnny Griffin, George Coleman, Al Cohn, Jimmy Raney, Barry Harris, Eric Alexander and David Liebman. For more then 40 years he is a member of the Rein de Graaff Trio and appeared on numerous jazzfestivals like Nice, Pescara, San Remo, Athens, Toronto, Montreal and New York. Since 2006 he is leading The Eric Ineke JazzXpress, a swinging band in the hardbop tradition. In 2012 he published his first book ‘’ The Ultimate Sideman’’, which he wrote together with David Liebman, for Pincio Publishers. He teaches at the jazz department of the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague.
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Colourful Reprise (2018) Eimi Witmer
Name: Stephanie-Eimi Witmer Main Subject: Early Music Singing Research Supervisor: Kate Clark Title of Research: Colourful Reprise Research Question: “What does a singer need to know in order to ‘tastefully’ embellish the reprise in the airs of early 18th century French Cantatas?” Summary of Results: The French Cantatas emerged during the period between Lully’s last opera (Armide, 1686) and Rameau’s first opera (Hippolyte et Aricie, 1733). While the French cantata composers adopted the Italian forms and technique, they all remained in their attempt of uniting the Italian form with the traditional French Lyrical style, the “animated” melodies that served as an artful Imitation of the French speech. Every carefully constructed airs are therefore always to some extent an oration. The “reprise” in an air often stands as an confirmation of the periodic structure of the poem, which is the most powerful section where a singer confirms the statement made in the beginning. What sort of effects do we see in the reprise of Montéclair’s Cantata La mort de Didon? … such question asks for an contextual interpretation. Bearing in mind that the composers have chosen the melody, ornaments and speech rhythms - in order to convey the emotions being expressed by the words, it is essential that a singer masters reciting the French poetry and to bare the task of practicing oration so that one can convey the various “affects” or “passions” to the audience. Today we find the ingredients like “the quantity of syllable”, “oratorical accents”, “doubled consonants” and the French vocal ornaments in B. de Bacilly’s treatises Remarques curieuses sur L'art de bien chanter (1668). Furthermore, we find 18 variations of ornaments - each of them to serve different Expressions - described in Les Principes de Musique (Paris, 1736) by M. de Montéclair. Biography: The US/S-Korean Mezzo Soprano was born in Tokyo, Japan. After studying at the Kunitachi College of Music (Japan), she earned her Bachelor’s degree in Historical Singing in 2015 at the Royal Conservatoire of The Hague studying with P. Kooij, M. Chance, J. Feldman, R. Blaze, P. Bertin and D. Mields. Eimi’s recent performances include J.S. Bach’s Matthew Passion, Hohe Messe and Magnificat (2nd Soprano), Vivaldi’s Gloria, Magnificat and Dixit Dominus, Monteverdi’s Selve Morale e Spirituale, Haendel’s Messiah, Rinaldo (Rinaldo), Giulio Cesare in Egitto (Sesto), Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas (Spirit /2nd witch), M. A. Charpentier’s Leçons de ténèbres (2nd Soprano), C. Monteverdi’s Il Ballo delle ingrate (4th ingrate) with Les Talens Lyriques / Christophe Rousset (Dutch National Opera / Brighton Early Music Festival).
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Relative Solmisation as a Tool for Teaching and Learning in Choral Education (2018) Tim Tomassen
Name: Tim Sebastiaan Tomassen Main Subject: Master of Music Education according to the Kodály Concept Research Supervisors: Suzanne Konings, Jasper Grijpinkh: Title of Research: Relative Solmisation as a Tool for Teaching and Learning in Choral Education Research Question: How can Relative Solmisation be used as a Tool for Teaching and Learning in Choral Education? Summary of Results: In the Netherlands National Children’s Choir children from all over the Netherlands with different backgrounds, sing on a high level and perform on stage with professional orchestras and ensembles. The tool of relative solmisation is used in studying the repertoire they will sing in concerts. In this paper I will look into the way this tool is being used and how this relates to the development of broader musicianship skills of the choir singers. I will analyse the initial stage of musical literacy as presented in three different Kodály method inspired books. To be able to analyse the teaching and learning process in both the literature and my own teaching practice for the Netherlands National Children’s Choir of Vocaal Talent Nederland I will use the Sound – Name - Symbol diagram. In this practice based case study I hope to show which steps are involved in the process of learning to sight-read music as a young choir singer. Biography: Tim Tomassen is a music teacher who teaches at De Haagsche School Vereniging International Department, The Hague. After his Bachelor in Music Education at Codarts, Conservatory of Rotterdam he studied the Master of Music Education according to the Kodály Concept at the Royal Conservatoire The Hague. Since 2016 he is working as a solfege and theory teacher at the Netherlands National Children’s Choir and the School of Young Talent at the Royal Conservatoire The Hague.
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Comparative Analysis of Performances by four different pianists (2016) Jihee Min
Name: Jihee Min Main subject: Classical Piano Research Coach: Bert Mooiman Title of research: Comparative Analysis of Performances by four different pianists Research question: What are the differences between four performances of Beethoven’s piano sonata “das Lebewohl,” played by distinctive players and how can musician improve their analytical listening skill based upon this research? Summary of Results: YouTube is a good source of music interpretation of how a piece of music could be interpreted and performed. Listening to recordings is a wonderful way of obtaining musical ideas from the talented musicians around the world. However, I realized that when one listens to a music without knowing the music beforehand, it is difficult to understand the diverse interpretation of the music from any of the YouTube videos. This pitiful fact led me to a question: What should I do to listen with more analytical ability to obtain broaden and diverse interpretation from recordings? The research is made with comparative analysis of performances by four pianists, Emil Giles, Claudio Arrau, Dmitry Masleev, and Alfred Brendel, on Beethoven’s piano sonata “das Lebewohl” to improve pianist’s analytical listening skill. To understand diverse interpretation contained in performances of four pianists, basic knowledge of this sonata including musical analysis and historical background is presented prior to analysis of performances. Comparative analysis of performance is categorized to five main sections: Theme development, articulation, pedal usage, tempo flexibility and phrasing. In the end of analysis, one can easily witness Gilels showing clean and stable performance in general. Arrau shows the most clear and motivic transformation amongst the four. Masleev stands out with playing the most even performance. Last but not least, Brendel best demonstrates his personal understandings through a whole piece. To improve analytical listening skill through analysis of four performances, one should be able to apply the process of analyzing the performance which is used in this research to one’s own studies. The process consists of four steps: Obtaining basic knowledge of music, categorizing the things to look out for when listening, comparing their recordings according to the categories in the second point and applying what you have acquired to your own playing. Biography Jihee Min was born in South Korea in 1990. She began to play the piano at her age of 7 in Yongin where she was born. She continued her studying in specialized institution of education of classical piano, SunHwa Arts School and SunHwa Arts High School. In 2010, she came to Netherlands to widen her perspective of music and learn music in hometown of classical music. She began to study at Royal Conservatory of The Hague with Professor Naum Grubert.
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Research Paper: Johann Sebastian Bach, a religious-philosophical approach to the beauty of his music (2016) Aljosja Mietus
Name: Aljosja Mietus Main Subject: Harpsichord Research Supervisor: Bert Mooiman Title of Research: Johann Sebastian Bach - a religious-philosophical approach to the beauty of his music Research Question: Is it possible, with the help of philosophical concepts, to pinpoint a universal dimension in music that can, at least partly, explain its beauty? Summary of Results: In this research paper, the author investigates if it is possible, with the help of philosophical concepts, to pinpoint a universal dimension in music that can, at least partly, explain its beauty. He defines music with the help of contemporary thinker R. Welten as more than a phenomenon that can be accurately described in a purely scientific way, but as something that transcends it because it has the ability to move, to affect people. Consequently he studies passages from the philosophical works of the writers F.W.J. Schelling (1775-1854), A. Schopenhauer (1788-1860) and H. Cohen (1842-1918), who all gave musical art a fundamental role in their philosophical reflections. The author comes to the conclusion that all thinkers agree in their own way on the idea that ‘true’ musical art originates in the mastery of strict forms (e.g. harmony, or musical styles such as fugues or dances) and the overcoming of these forms without losing freedom. In the last part of the paper, this temporary conclusion is put to the test in existing music, namely J.S. Bach’s Ouvertüre nach Französischer Art and Goldberg variations. In these works, the author sees a confirmation of his temporary conclusion in the way Bach merges the forms of strict counterpoint and rich harmony with the forms of the different French dances, and in the limiting boundaries the overarching idea behind the Goldberg variations imposes without limiting the expressiveness of the work. As a final conclusion, the author states that the use of philosophical concepts in musical reality can be challenging since thinking about music often seems farfetched from musical reality, but that this research shows that philosophy can help to shed some light on one of mankind’s many mysteries: the beauty of music. Biography: Aljosja Mietus (The Netherlands, 1990) received his first piano lessons when he was eight years old, but switched to the harpsichord at the age of twelve, having lessons with Menno van Delft and later with Tilman Gey. After finishing his secondary education at the Barlaeus Gymnasium in Amsterdam, he started his Theology studies at Leiden University where he graduated in 2012. During his Theology studies he started his Harpsichord and Basso Continuo studies at the Royal Conservatoire of The Hague with Jacques Ogg and Patrick Ayrton. He finished his Bachelor’s in 2014 and started his Master’s at the same institute with Jacques Ogg and Kris Verhelst. He also started a Master of Theology at the PThU in Amsterdam in that same year.
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The influences of John Coltrane in Kenny Garrett's style of improvisation (2016) Manvydas Pratkelis
Name: Manvydas Pratkelis Main Subject: Jazz Saxophone Research Supervisor: Patrick Schenkius Title of Research: The influences of John Coltrane in Kenny Garret’s style of improvisation Research Question: Which improvisation techniques did Kenny Garrett take from John Coltrane and what did he do to adopt these techniques to his own improvisation on the alto saxophone Summary of Results: The main reason of this research is to learn about the major influential aspects of alto saxophonist Kenny Garrett’s improvisation, which he adopted from studying tenor saxophonist John Coltrane’s improvisation, and how he uses it on alto saxophone. This does not mean that John Coltrane was his only influence, as there is no doubt that Garrett studied a lot of Charlie Parker’s improvisation and that of many more jazz musicians. However, I found that Garrett’s biggest influence is Coltrane, especially his harmonic improvisation and melodic aspects. The main source of information for the analysis are various John Coltrane recordings from 1957 till 1966, and Kenny Garrett’s studio and live recordings from 1984 till 2005. My research is mainly of two parts: First - looking for similarities, the same harmonic- melodic structures of phrases, listening to Coltrane and Garrett from the original recordings, finding similar aspects, and notating similar characteristics. Second – the analysis, understanding, and adopting of these ideas in my own playing. Biography: After winning the Grand Prix in the international “Vilnius Jazz Young Power” in 2010, alto saxophonist Manvydas Pratkelis has come a long way. He has developed into an expressive, universal and subtle performer, exploring technique and improvisation in a wide range of musical traditions and styles, starting from early jazz, to be-bop, free jazz, fusion, contemporary, hip-hop, funk, R&B styles.
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Antonio Romero y Andía (2016) Ale Farina Martin
The main objective of this research is to know A. Romero as a promoter of the culture and the pedagogy in Spain. To understand this, it has to be known his life as musician and virtuoso clarinetist at the time, for this reason he could climb musically and socially until he got to the position for helping and expanding the culture in Spain.
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“Play like a singer and sing like an instrumentalist!” (2016) Sven Weyens
Name: Sven Weyens Main Subject: Classical Singing Research Supervisor: Kathryn Cok Title of Research: ‘Play like a singer and sing like an instrumentalist!” Research Question: What are the main differences between vocalists and instrumentalists? Is it an advantage to have an instrumental background as a singer and vice versa? Summary of Results: I am a professional cellist in the Residence Orchestra of The Hague, but I have always been singing next to my career as a cellist. When I started my Masters in classical singing in 2014, I was confronted with the fact that in many ways singing is really different from playing an instrument, as well physically, technically as mentally. But in some ways it feels the same. The question arose: are there real differences between singing and playing an instrument, and what are they exactly? This Research paper gives an answer to the question what the differences are between playing an instrument and singing, and explains them. In seven chapters I compare the physical instrument, the location of pitch, text versus musical language, personality, etc… I found that it is an advantage to have an instrumental background as a singer and vice versa. There are also big differences between singing and playing an instrument. The research is based on a questionnaire, interviews, books and my own experiences as a cellist and singer. Biography: Sven Weyens (°1974, Antwerp) started playing the cello at the age of ten with Frieda Celis. He studied in Antwerp, Leuven, Ghent, Zwolle and Detmold under Jaap Kruithof, Hans Mannes, France Springuel, Jeroen Reuling and Marcio Carneiro. In 1998 he obtained his Masters Degree with great distinction. He also took masterclasses with Harro Ruysenaars, Schmoel Magen, Francois Guy, Wolgang Laufer, Valentin Erben and Thomas Kakuschka. He is a member of the Residence Orchestra (The Hague Philharmonic) since 2004. Besides that, he has specialised in chamber music. He performed with a.o. the Josef Aschtak Trio, with whom he toured in the U.S. and Portugal. Sven gave masterclasses in the U.S. and Switzerland. In September 2014 Sven Weyens started a masters in Classical singing with Sasja Hunnego at the Royal Conservatoire of The Hague. Since then, he has performed regularly in the chamber music series of the Residence Orchestra and sang the part of “Te fish” in the summer of 2014 in "Vom Fischer und seiner Frau" by Otmar Schoeck, at the Grachtenfestival Amsterdam. In November 2014, Sven performed “Dover Beach” by Samuel Barber live for NPO4. In January 2015 he sang the role of Bartolo in a production of Le Nozze de Figaro at the Dutch National Opera Academy, and the role of Don Alfonso in Cosi fan Tutte in Festival Opera Aan Zee. He also sang the part of Moses in C.P.E. Bach’s “Israelieten in der Wüste", the bass arias in J.S. Bach’s Christmas Oratorio, the baritone soli in the Fauré”s Requiem and in the 9th Symphony of Beethoven. He is currently preparing his master's final recital, where he will perform “Kindertotenlieder” of G. Mahler, accompanied by members of the Residence Orchestra The Hague.
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Integration of harmonic concepts in the improvisation through rhythmic exercises. (2016) Miguel Sucasas Bujones
Miguel Sucasas Bujones Jazz Saxophone Research Supervisor: Patrick Schenkius Integration of harmonic concepts in the improvisation through rhythmic exercises. How can I internalize and apply harmonic concepts through the study of rhythmic exercises and where can I find rhythmical ideas? This research paper is presented as a handbook of exercises. It contains a first chapter as introduction to my own rhythm exercises. Part of these exercises were inspired on the traditional Indian methods of solfege. I could get access to this information thanks to the advanced rhythm lessons that I assisted at Amsterdam conservatory. This Indian tradition have a strong focus on the study of rhythm. Another part of the exercises were developed by me in my daily practice as a result of months of practice and transcriptions from traditional rhythms. In the second chapter I apply this exercises to the different harmonic concepts. The objective of these exercises is make the musician get fluent and free to use this new harmonic sources in a natural way on the improvisation. Biography: Born in Galicia, Spain. I started studying traditional Galician music at the age of six in Redondela and went to study classical saxophone in the “Professional Conservatory Victor Ureña” (Galicia-Spain). I moved to Portugal in 2010 in order to study Jazz saxophone at ESMAE (Escola Superior de Música e Artes do Espectáculo de Porto). I finished the Saxophone Jazz Bachelor in 2014 at ESML (Escola Superior de Música de Lisboa). I have been playing in the European Saxophone Ensemble since 2013 around all Europe. I have played in several international bands, including the “Saxophone Orchestra of Redondela”. I recorded my first album with the Spanish master of the saxophone, Pedro Iturralde. I have played in the famous band of Roy Ellis, Mr. Symarip (Ska-Rocksteady). I recorded an album with him and played on two European tours with this band. I performed at the International Jazz Festival in Guimarães with the Big Band of Porto Jazz High School. I have recorded with the “Orquestra de Saxos de Redondela”, “La vaga banda” (Ska and Reggae), Caraba (Rock), Roy Ellis (Ska-Rocksteady), European Saxophone Ensemble (Jazz, Classical and Free improvisation) and have recorded other works like sideman in the area of Pop and Rock music.
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Sing, Move, Play! Training Inner Hearing and Polyphonic Hearing in the Violin Lesson (2016) Estela Benita Bernes
Name: Estela Benita Bernés Main subject: Music Education According to the Kodály Concept. Research supervisor: Liesbeth Ackermans Title of Research: Sing, Move, Play! Training Inner Hearing and Polyphonic Hearing in the Violin Lesson Research Question: How to introduce the use of relative solfa and movement activities in the violin lesson using specific violin repertoire in order to train inner hearing and achieve polyphonic hearing? Summary of Results: With this paper I aim to raise awareness on the importance of training the inner hearing and polyphonic hearing in the violin (or instrumental) lesson. The violin is a melodic instrument; traditionally we primarily work on the violin solo part of the pieces during lessons, focussing sometimes mainly on technical difficulties, which leads to a poor understanding of the music that is being played. The goal in this case is working towards the achievement of polyphonic hearing, that will enable the students to understand in a deeper level the pieces of their repertoire regarding form, phrasing, harmony/polyphony, rhythm and articulation; therefore allowing them to be independent musicians that can make their own musical decisions when playing. I have designed a series of activities related to different pieces of the violin repertoire – from beginners to advanced – using movement, singing, relative solfa and improvisation on the instrument. These activities work as well as a bridge between the general musicianship lessons and the violin lessons. Biography: Estela Benita Bernés is a violin player and teacher from the area of Barcelona, Spain. After completing a Bachelor in violin in ESMuC (Barcelona's Music College) in 2010, she moved to The Hague, The Netherlands, where she has studied violin and music education at The Royal Conservatoire. Estela has performed with various professional and student orchestras and ensembles playing from classical music to jazz or experimental contemporary music. Currently she is developing her Kodály-inspired teaching practise in the area of The Hague, where she works for different music education programs.
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The use of Vibrato on the violin in Mozart’s late orchestral music: Performance guide for the modern orchestral violinist (alternative version?) (2016) Yeni Ha
Name : YENI HA Main Subject : Violin Research supervisor : KATHERYNE CLARK Research Question : For my Masters research project I want to focus on the use of vibrato in one particular musical context and period, namely the orchestral repertoire of Mozart between 1778-1791. My research question is: how can 21st century symphony violinists, using modern instruments and bows, best use vibrato, if they want to stay close to the intentions of Mozart and to reflect the performance practice of his time.
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Jarzębski's Divisions (2019) Matthijs van der Moolen
Name: Matthijs van der Moolen Main Subject: Baroque Trombone Research Supervisor: Susan Williams Title of Research: Jarzębski’s Divisions - a transition from vocal to instrumental writing for the trombone Research Question: How are the diminution pieces by Adam Jarzębski showing a transformation from vocal to instrumental writing for the trombone? Summary of Results: The aim of this research was to show how the 'diminution pieces' from Adam Jarzębski's Canzoni e Concerti (1627) illustrate a transformation from vocal to instrumental writing for the trombone. Those nine pieces are very different from other works in the same time and period, and combine two very different genres: diminution/division pieces, and canzoni/sonate. In the first chapters of this research, I will give a general idea about the music practices in the sixteenth and seventeenth century. I will also zoom in on the early trombones, and their use in different settings. After this background information, I made an analysis of Jarzębski's collection Canzoni e Concerti. Most attention went to the analysis of the 'diminution pieces' that are based on well-known motets from the sixteenth century. Based on this analysis, I finally give several suggestions for the performance of these compositions, for example, about the choice of instruments, the (basso continuo) accompaniment, and the tuning and pitch. My conclusion is that the 'diminution pieces' in Canzoni e Concerti show a clear transition from vocal to instrumental writing. Because they are so obviously written like earlier diminution pieces, they should in my opinion also be played like that. Biography: Matthijs van der Moolen (The Netherlands, 1994) studies historical trombone (master) with Charles Toet. Before, he has finished two bachelor degrees: historical trombone with Charles Toet, and classical trombone with Pete Saunders and Tim Dowling). Matthijs is first trombonist with the (modern) orchestra Ars Musica, and is member of the Dutch Baroque Orchestra. He played as a freelancer in a variety of historical and contemporary groups. He co-founded the ensembles Ongestreken and Castello Consort. With the latter, he was selected for the Eeemerging-programme in 2017. The Castello Consort has performed at numerous international festivals for early music, and featured in the foremost concert series in The Netherlands.
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A new Historiography of Jazz in Europe. Eleven styles grouped in three periods. (2016) Wouter Turkenburg
Name: Wouter Turkenburg Main Subject: Guitar-Jazz Research supervisors: James Lincoln Collier, Wolfram Knauer, David Liebman Title of Research: A new Historiography of Jazz in Europe. Eleven styles grouped in three periods Research Question: Which historiographical approach does justice to the specific development of jazz in Europe? Summary of Results: As a result of focusing on the development of jazz as music, on how jazz styles were learned in Europe, and on how jazz became part of the cultural landscape of Europe, in this paper a new historiography of jazz in Europe is constructed. Shown is that although jazz had the interest of scholars in Europe almost from the very start in 1917, it took quite some time before jazz as music was really understood in Europe. Also shown is that in Europe the learning of the various jazz styles happened at a continuing faster pace. Made clear is that jazz, alien at first, became and integral part of the European landscape. Examples are given that once jazz was integrated into the music culture of Europe, jazz musicians in Europe made major contributions to all further new developments in jazz. What this paper also makes clear is that around 1977 and 2007 the cultural landscape had gone through such paradigm shifts that one can speak of three distinctive periods. A clear as possible focus on jazz as music is obtained by not primarily focusing on what ‘great’ men did, not on where exactly in Europe special events took place, nor on exact dates. The history of jazz in Europe presented in this paper is conceived in such a way that it serves as an opening chorus, as an invitation to improvise upon. Biography: Wouter Turkenburg, (Singapore, 1953) studied classical guitar at the Conservatory of Arnhem, musicology at the University of Amsterdam, is founder of the World Music School of the Music Lyceum in Amsterdam and became head of the jazz department and teacher of jazz history at the Royal Conservatory, The Hague, The Netherlands. He also gives lectures in jazz history at the University of Utrecht and Leiden. He is the co-founder of the IASJ, the International Association of School of Jazz, based in The Hague.
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Research 'Advocaatje ging op reis' (2016) Emma van Dobben
Name: Emma van Dobben Main subject: ‘Music Education According to the Kodály Concept’. Research coaches: Renee Jonker, Ewan Gibson Title of research: ‘Advocaatje ging op reis.’ Research question: ‘How can music education for children at an early age benefit from using singable picture books?’ Summary of results: This research is about singable picture books: a picture book with one (children’s) song accompanied by illustrations for every verse, chorus or sentence. Singable picture books can have many positive effects on the singing voice, linguistic and reading skills, improvisation skills, social skills and narrative skills. Singable picture books can become a ritual and a moment of concentration in the lesson. It is an attractive way to present and prepare a song for the children. Folk songs are very suitable for singable picture books because of their narrative character. The children will have a more lively experience by looking at the story while singing or listening to a song. In this study I will explore the benefits of using singing and illustrations combined in a picture book. Also I have made a list with criteria what makes a good singable picture book. In the Netherlands there are not many singable picture books. I have made two books with a folk song in Dutch and a musical activity suitable for age 4-7. These books are meant for music specialists, but can also be used in other lessons or at home. Method Literature study about the benefits of using singable picture books: singing voice, folk songs, picture books, multisensory learning, reading and linguistic development. Practice based study: analysis of the singable picture books by trying them out in the music lessons, and write down features of the songs, books, and illustrations. Criteria list: based on my findings according to this analysis, what works well? What makes a good singable picture book? According the criteria list search for suitable Dutch repertoire.I will make two books with a folk song in Dutch and an extra musical activity. I have to find two illustrators who are willing to illustrate the book. Results: findings of my observations and observations of colleagues. What are the children’s reactions? Biography Emma van Dobben is a music specialist on different primary schools in the Netherlands. After she finished her Bachelor Music Education she worked at a youth theatre in Dordrecht as a singing teacher for children. In 2009 she started her Master of Music at the Conservatoire Utrecht and did her research in folk music. After that she wanted to specialize more in music education for primary schools and started the Master of Music according to the Kodály concept.
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Repetetive Structures in Western Contemporary Music (2016) Jan Foote
In this essay, I will explore repetitive music, the compositional techniques thereof and their aesthetic goals and consequences. In order to do so, I will examine methods of composing using repetitive compositional techniques and will then explore the reasons behind why these techniques were used.
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In what ways does the sing-along book improve a music lesson? (2016) Pilar de Sena Tomas
The Sing-Along Books as an important tool in the Music lessons. The creation of my own Sing-Along Book in Spanish: "El Señor Don Gato".
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Romanticism and its heritage: The piano transcription (2015) Goran Filipec
Name: Goran Filipec Main Subject: Classical Piano Research Coach: Andrew Wright Title of Research: Romanticism and its heritage: The piano transcription Research Question: Where is the phenomenon of the transcription coming from? Are there similar creations in other arts that it could be compared with? How to differentiate artistic transcription from a technical one, and what are the means used in its creation that make this difference? Summary of Results: In my artistic work transcriptions attracted much of my attention and I had the opportunity to play and perform them often in concert. It is relatively easy to remark that many transcriptions from Romanticism are not often performed anymore. A big part of them however can still be considered high quality piano pieces. That fact opened for me important questions about the source of the transcription, and its essence. While trying to answer to these questions I pursued a musicological research combined with practical analysis of different sound makings necessary to create adequate acoustic effects. I found that categorizing transcriptions and their main characteristics in comparison to their original sources suggests immediately an interpretative guideline. For example a textual and ideal independence from the original could suggest a more free interpretation. On the other side, the transcription, which is trying to reproduce original ideas with different means, implies more respect of the original piece. Biography: Goran Filipec was born in 1981 in Croatia where he received his first music lessons. He studied piano at the Academy Ino Mirkovich, Zagreb Music Aacademy, Oxana Yablonskaya Piano Institute, Schola Cantorum and Moscow conservatory “P.I.Tchaikovsky”. He performed as soloist in Europe, USA, South America and Japan, and was awarded several top prizes at international piano competitions such as José Iturbi (USA), Premio Mario Zanfi (Italy), Gabala International Piano Competition (Azerbaijan) and Concours Ile de France. He has recorded for Naxos (CD), France 2, Radio Suisse Romande and other radio and TV channels.
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In search of new dimensions: pieces for electronically processed double bass. (2019) Julián Sarmiento Escobar
Name: Julián Sarmiento Main Subject: Classical Double Bass Research Supervisor: Karst de Jong Title of Research: In search of new dimensions: Pieces for electronically enhanced Double Bass Research Question: How can I develop an artistic product, which includes the electronically enhanced double bass and allows me to interact with topics relevant to today? Summary of Results: Since the start of this project, the goal was to discover and explore the paths of creative processes. On the road, I found a lot of overwhelming challenges that showed me how complicated it is to create a coherent, relevant and interesting artistic product. However, I learned that making decisions at the right moment opens the door to a huge amount of other possibilities. A group of short pieces was created. They are based on field recordings of songs and chants of the Original Indigenous Peoples of Colombia, done by León Cobo. These pieces have been created together with Mári Máko and they are our views on specific sound aspects of these recordings, and also the result of a research in how to electronically enhance the Double Bass. I believe that the exploration of this material can raise the awareness of the music and original practices that took place in Colombia before the Hispanic colonization. Biography: Julián Sarmiento was born in Bogotá, Colombia. He studied double bass in Bogota for several years and in 2010 he entered the Colombia National Symphony. In 2012 he moved to the Netherlands, where he is currently in his last year of his Master's degree at the Royal Conservatoire of The Hague, studying with Jean-Paul Everts. At the same time he became an academist in the Residentie Orkest in The Hague and also plays regularly with Het Ballet Orkest in Amsterdam. One of Julián's most important activities is in the field of contemporary or modern music. In Colombia, he played in the Als Eco Ensemble, nationally one of the most important ensembles of modern music. In The Netherlands, he is regularly invited to play in the Insomnio Ensemble. Since 2015, is a member of the ensemble But What About.
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To C or not to C: The Modern Use and Disuse of the C Clarinet (2019) Arno Rockler
Name: Arno Rockler Main Subject: Classical Clarinet Research Supervisor: Susan Williams Title of Research: To C or not to C: The Modern Use and Disuse of the C Clarinet Research Question: How should clarinetists approach playing C clarinet parts effectively in modern orchestral performance? Summary of Results: Throughout the 19th century, composers' use of the C clarinet generally declined. However, its importance grew as the reasons for its inclusion moved from technical considerations towards musical ones. In modern orchestral settings, performers must carefully weigh its importance, advantages and disadvantages to come to an informed musical decision as to its inclusion or exclusion Biography: Arno Rockler is a Dutch-American clarinetist born in Boston, Massachusetts in the United States. He studied clarinet performance at the University of Massachusetts Amherst under Michael Sussman, receiving his Bachelor of Music degree in Clarinet Performance in 2015. Afterwards, he began study with Pierre Woudenberg at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague. He has performed in varied orchestral and chamber settings throughout Europe, including concerts in Oslo, Munich, Vienna, Budapest, and Amsterdam.
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Tools and arrangement of Latino American music for double bass solo and piano (2018) Abraham Ramos
Name: 
Abraham Francisco Ramos Chodo Main Subject: Double bass Research supervisor(s): Stefan Petrovic Title of Research: Tools and arrangement of Latino American music for double bass solo and piano. Research Questions: Is it possible for double bass to assume the solo role in Latino American traditional music? How to make and arrangement for double bass and piano, keeping the traditional characteristics? Summary of Results: The characteristics of the double bass, all his life used to be an accompaniment instrument, in charge of the harmony and rhythm support, nevertheless many composers wrote solo pieces, concertos, etc. for this instrument. The fact that there are not many written pieces for double bass solo in Latino American traditional music and that I was born in a place where the migration movements made miscegenation of people, culture with Africa, Europe and Latino America, aroused my curiosity and my will is to build a project where I can bring this music to the double bass solo repertoire. Presented this reasons my master research is focus on how can the process of arranging this music for double bass solo and piano be done. At first I needed to choose the repertoire, define the stylistic aspects of the piece and determine how I am going to represent the defining aspects of the traditional music in an arrangement for double bass solo and piano. As a result of the outcome material I decided to concentrate in a small book all the necessary tools for arranging a traditional piece; this small book includes: a brief biography of the composer/s, description and definition of the piece and style; score examples of how it should be played; harmonic and melodic structure of the piece; translation of lyrics; and an example of my own arrangement for double bass and piano. To demonstrate that the double bass can assume the solo role in Latino American traditional music, is the main goal of this research paper. Biography: Abraham Francisco Ramos Chodo was born in 1992 in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain). At the age of 10 he stated studying Timple (traditional instrument of Canary Islands) at the SOLDOMILARE music school. In 2006 he began his music studies at the Conservatory of Canarias until 2012. One year after his entrance, he started playing the double bass. In 2012 he moved to Den Haag (the Netherlands) starting his bachelor at the Royal Conservatory of The Hague. Currently he is studying his Master degree in the same conservatory. His musical performance trajectory is filled with projects related to Latino American music, Canary Islands’ traditional music, classical music and Fusion Jazz.
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Phrasing and interplay from the vocal point of view (2019) Irini Konstantinidi
Name: Irini Konstantinidi Main Subject: Jazz Singing Research supervisor: Yvonne Smeets Title of Research: Phrasing and interplay from the vocal point of view. Phrasing as the vocalist’s tool to stimulate interplay within a jazz combo Research Questions: How can phrasing be the tool of the jazz vocalist, in order to stimulate interplay within the band, while singing the theme or improvising? What are the elements of phrasing that the vocalist needs to develop, in order to participate in the process of exchanging musical ideas on the spot? Summary of Results: Phrasing is considered to be one of the most crucial elements in music. Rhythmical phrasing in jazz can be described as the various ways in which instruments articulate their musical suggestions and eventually participate in the interplay-musical conversation. Jazz is all about having a conversation that is characterised by the spontaneous exchanging of improvised ideas on the spot. During this research, I analysed live performances of the masters and of myself and explored the elements of phrasing that need to be developed by the jazz vocalist (or any other instrument in the jazz combo) in order to be able to move freely within the form of the jazz standard tune, create interesting rhythmical variations of the theme and phrase her/his imrpovisational ideas in such a way that can stimulate interplay. Through interviewing some of the most important jazz musicians/educators of today’s international jazz scene, I collected valuable information and enhanced existing ideas into exercices about practicing phrasing and interplay. Biography: Irini Konstantinidi is a well-established Greek jazz vocalist currently residing and performing in The Netherlands. Reviews about Irini have been highlighting her lyrical, expressive and clear sound, with which she has achieved a personal, refined interpretation of jazz. Her creative approach to vocal improvisation makes her music performance unique. Scat singing is like an extension of her storytelling and imagination. She graduated from the Jazz department of Athenaeum Conservatory in Athens in 2006. Since then she has been performing and presenting her discography in the most important jazz venues and festivals in Greece as well as on shows of the National Greek Television and Radio. She is now collaborating as a vocalist and lyricist with Nomadic Treasures, a collective international project, based in The Netherlands.
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Stockhausen's language of extended techniques for flute (2019) Davide Baldo
This research wants to reflect on the role of unconventional flute sounds, also called extended techniques in Stockhausen’s repertoire. The need for reflecting on this subject comes from the chance to properly express the artistic intention of a composer who could, with an extremely detailed graphical approach, explain the musical content of his sound requirements. The chance to work under the tutelage of Kathinka Pasveer (Stockhausen’s flute player and muse), gives the research a unique insight into Stockhausen's flute repertoire. The "semiography" and "philological" issues, associated with the dramaturgical role of the musical material, led the research to a deeper understanding of the added values of this alternative non-traditional sounds. Analyzing their content and relative musical function, made it possible to develop not only a structured approach for flute players towards this music, but also to highlight a more articulated and detailed approach of the composer himself regarding the flute and its role in the circle LICHT.
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Performers acoustics (2019) Rogier Tamminga
Name: Rogier Tamminga Main Subject: Classical Cello Research Supervisor: Patrick van Deurzen Title of Research: Performer's Acoustics Research Question: How can you manage, as a performer, to get optimal room or hall acoustics in a given situation? Summary of Results: Acoustics have been an integral part of music ever since its first existance. Every musical piece sounds optimal in a specific acoustical environment. However, attention for acoustics has been only little. For different performances, different acoustics are required and in every place, different acoustics are apparent. In this study, acoustical theory is investigated. The basics of acoustics are explained and the acoustics of well known places for musical performances are studied and revealed. With this knowledge, a model has been created to analyse and judge the acoustics, and guidelines were set up to adjust these to the performer's needs and wishes. This model is used in the adjustment of the acoustics of studio 3, where small changes are made and compared. Biography: Rogier Tamminga moved in 2012 from Groningen to Den Haag to start his Bachelor at the Royal Conservatoire with Jan Ype Nota and Michel Strauss. He has since done many projects and played in a variety of ensembles, among others as principal cellist in the Nationaal Jeugdorkest, at North Sea Jazz Festival, and in the European Improvisation Intensive. In 2014 Rogier started a second Bachelor with Architecture and the Built Environment at the Technical University in Delft. In some courses he integrated both worlds, in which acoustics form an interesting subject. He is currently doing an internship with Margriet Lautenbach at Peutz B.V.
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The Evolution of a Tradition: how traditional bassplayers influenced the soloing of Larry Grenadier (2015) Marijn van de Ven
I will compare bass solo from Larry Grenadier around the time when he was recording the Art of the Trio albums with Brad Mehldau, with bass solos from Jimmy Blanton, Paul Chambers, Ray Brown, Oscar Pettiford, Charles Mingus, Oscar Pettiford, WIlbur Ware and Charlie Haden.
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What can be the role of the viola in Senegalese music? (2016) Rosa Welker
Name : Rosa Welker Main subject : Viola Research coaches : Patrick Schenkius and Arno Willekes Title of research: What can be the role of the viola in Senegalese music ? Summary of Results: This research involves a possible viola’s role in Senegalese music including some knowledge on Senegal, African music and Senegalese instruments. Viola can have two functions in this musical style: melodic and harmonic. These latter are explained through ideas and examples such as audio illustrations or musical scores. This research can help classical musicians interested in playing or discovering a rich musical culture. Biography : Born in 1991 in Switzerland, Rosa Welker got in touch with the musical world at six years old. After two years of musical initiation, she began to learn violin. Admitted in a special highschool program for music, she was able to focus even more on her passion, which expanded through meeting and sharing with others musicians. She started playing viola six years ago. In 2011 she entered at the Haute Ecole de Musique of Lausanne in Christine Sörensen’s class and acquired her Bachelor’s diploma in 2014. From two years she studies with Asdis Valdimarsdottir at the Royal Conservatoire of The Hague.
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Auditie Contrabas (2015) Teun Godschalk
How do you prepare an audition for an orchestra? The subject I chose to research is how to be best prepared for an audition. An important part of the professional music business is being well prepared for auditions. I have experienced this during the Orchestral Master Double Bass, followed at the Royal Conservartory in The Hague. Granted the most important thing is being well prepared musically, by rehearsing the required solo pieces and orchestral excerpts. But preparation for an audition does not solely come down to musical capabilities. There are other aspects of the audition that a musician can prepare for. For example, it is important to know more about the orchestra you’re auditioning for. What sort of musician are they looking for and which qualities should he or she possess? Another subject I that I want to explore is dealing with nerves and anxiety.
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Perfect Pitch: How does it influence my aural imagination as a jazz singer? (2016) Liesbeth Gieben
Name: Liesbeth Gieben Main subject: Jazz Vocals Research Supervisor: Patrick Schenkius Research Title: Perfect Pitch! Research question: How does perfect pitch influence my aural imagination as a jazz singer?
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Ornamentation and French style in Henry Purcell's vocal music (2015) Kristen Witmer
Name: Kristen Witmer Main Subject: Early Music Singing Research Coaches: Gerda van Zelm & Patrick Ayrton Title of Research: Ornamentation and the French style in the vocal music by Henry Purcell Research Question: What kind of ornamentation did Henry Purcell use in his vocal music and to what extent can his music written in French style be treated in a French way? Summery of Results: Henry Purcell received his musical training as a small boy during a unique era in England. By the command of King Charles II who wished to have the same kind of music he experienced at the French court, Purcell learned the newest style of composition in England at that time. Purcell is often acknowledged as a composer who developed his own unique style combining French and Italian style. However, it was only later in his life that Purcell intentionally started to learn and adapt the Italian style to his music. When Purcell writes in the French style, can I sing it like I would sing French music, with notes inégales and French ornamentations? Diverse interpretation on rhythmical alteration of Purcell’s music have been offered by many performers till the present day, and as if there’s been no conclusion reached, the interpretation is still left widely open for all performers. What was the likely custom of singers in Purcell’s time? What did Purcell expect in the performance of his vocal music? Fortunately, sources from Purcell himself and his contemporaries provide immense information on what kind of ornamentation was common at the time. Together with plenty of record about what kind of trained singers sang for Purcell, we can see how far Purcell took the advantages of these star singers to write even more elaborate music. The presentation will include further look at the reliable sources I’ve found on Purcell’s ornamentation, introduction to the important soprano singers of Purcell to be shown through a PowerPoint presentation, as well as a live performance of an ornamented version of Purcell’s song which I will demonstrate as the result of my research. Biography: American/Korean soprano Kristen Witmer studied classical and baroque singing at Tokyo University of the Arts. After graduation she received a scholarship from The Meiji Yasuda Cultural Foundation and studied at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague where she obtained Bachelor degree in Early Music Singing. She currently proceeds her Master degree with Lenie van den Heuvel, Peter Kooij, Michael Chance and Jill Feldman pursuing her research on Henry Purcell’s vocal music. Recent musical activities as a soloist include Handel’s Messiah with M. Suzuki, Bach’s Motet with P. Herreweghe, CD recording with Vox Luminis and Purcell’s King Arthur with Jean Tubéry.
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Cadenzas for Mozart’s Violin Concertos. An analysis of Mozart’s own cadenzas and how their style can be translated to the violin (2015) Rafael Font
Name: Rafael Font Viera Main Subject: Baroque Violin Research Coach: Bart van Oort Title of Research: Cadenzas for Mozart’s Violin Concertos: An analysis of Mozart’s own cadenzas and how their style can be translated to the violin Research Question: How can I prepare cadenzas for the violin concertos of Mozart in a way that is consistent with his compositional style during the time of writing (1773-1775)? Summary of Results: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s five violin concertos were written in the period between 1773 and 1775, before he had even turned 20 years old and before he had fully developed his compositional style. It is the belief of this research’s author that to fully complement these concertos, the cadenzas performed within them should match the composer’s style during this specific period of time. It is the purpose of this research to identify this style and more specifically the composer’s expectations of what a cadenza for his concertos should accomplish. In order to do this, we will take a two part approach. The first one consists of a detailed study of instructions on the performance cadenzas given by historical treatises that Mozart would have known, including among others those of Leopold Mozart and Johann Joachim Quantz. The second section looks at the cadenzas Mozart himself wrote during this specific time of his life, including five piano concertos, and one later work, the Sinfonia Concertante for violin and viola, which represents the only cadenza he ever wrote for a stringed instrument. The presentation will show in detail how closely Mozart followed the historical instructions by Quantz et al. on performing cadenzas in specific examples of his musical writing as well as give some general recommendations of adapting his style to the violin. This will be accompanied by selected recordings of Mozart’s cadenzas for piano as well as a demonstration of a possible violin cadenza for one of his violin concertos. Biography: Rafael Font Viera started his violin studies in Caracas, Venezuela. In 2013 he completed his Bachelor in Music studies in the Guildhall School of Music & Drama in London with teachers Jacqueline Ross and Pavlo Beznosiuk. Rafael has performed in many world class venues including the Barbican and Queen Elizabeth Halls, with groups such as the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, La Nuova Musica and La Serenissima. Rafael is a keen performer of chamber music in period instruments ranging from late renaissance to romantic as well as contemporary music. Rafael is currently studying at the Royal Conservatory of the Hague with Kati Debretzeni and Walter Reiter.
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Natural horn and valve horn in the 19th century. The period of transition between both instruments. (2015) Mateusz Cendlak
Name: Mateusz Cendlak Main subject: Natural horn Research coach: Herman Jeurissen Title of research: Natural horn and valve horn in the 19th century. The period of transition between both instruments. Research question: How long did it take the valve horn to completely replace its predecessor and why did they coexist for such a long period of time? Summary of Results: It is crucial for professional horn players (playing both natural and modern horn) to study the origins of their instrument. Just few decades after horn became a standard instrument of the orchestra horn players and makers started to search for ways to explore it more and broaden its capabilities. The main disadvantage of early horn was its limited range. Before the valve horn became the main instrument in this family a lot of experiments took place. The most important technique which arose from these experiments was since the middle of the 18th century the hand stopping technique. This way of playing had crucial influence on the attitude to the horn and made this instrument so distinctive. The evolution of hand stopping technique came to the point when natural horn was considered as a fully chromatic instrument. As a result, a lot of horn players did not get convinced about the invention of valve around 1815 and did not want to accept the new type of instrument which had only open sounds. The sense of esthetic of a great part of horn players and composers was the main reason why the natural instrument remained for them the real horn. The most conservative center of natural horn playing was Paris. It was where the most important treatises of horn were written. The class of natural horn of Paris Conservatory was closed down only in 1906. But not only French musicians remained faithful to the natural horn. Johannes Brahms never really accepted the new invention of valved horn and wrote all his pieces theoretically for natural instruments. The double horn we know from modern orchestras has been existing only since the first half of 20th century. Nowadays the natural horn is experiencing its renaissance and has been used by some contemporary composers such as Benjamin Britten or György Ligeti. Biography: I was born in Poznań (Poland) on 13th October 1987. I began my musical education at age of 13 in Music High-school in my hometown. After 7 years I decided to devote myself to music and began modern horn studies at Ignacy Jan Paderewski Academy of Music in Poznań with dr. Krzysztof Stencel. After two years when my school opened the natural horn subject I became the first student of this instrument in Poland. My experience with natural horn in Poland was not satisfying and after graduating I decided to continue my education at school with richer tradition.
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Development of horn's playing technique in 19th century (2016) Seunghun Kim
Name of student: Seunghun Kim Main subject: French Horn Name of research supervisor: Pete Saunders Title of research: Development of horn's playing technique in 19th century Research question: What is the development of horn playing technique from the beginning to the late 19th century? What was the playing technique of horn used in orchestral music in the 19th century? Summary of results and little explanation: This paper researches the development of horn playing technique throughout the 19th century. And the result of my research is the natural horn and valve horn are completely different instruments. Starting from the point of the natural horn, which was the instrument used at the beginning of the century, it describes the changes made to the horn itself, most notably the incorporation of valves. Through examples drawn from orchestral repertoire from three periods of the 19th century (the beginning of the 19th century: 1800-1840, the middle: 1840-1890, the late: 1890-1910). From simple parts in Beethoven's 3rd symphony through the increasingly difficult and complex parts of works by, among others, (Rossini, Schumann, Brahms, Mahler, Strauss) many aspects of the evolving technique of playing the horn are described. The paper concludes that now modern horn players should be aware of these developments, and also be able to play in the styles and on the instruments of the periods, such as the natural horn with hand stopping. It are very helpful to modern horn players when playing the music from the classical to the beginning of the romantic period. Short biography of the student: I was born in Gwangyang city, South Korea. And I studied the horn from 17 years old and I graduated the Seoul arts high school. And I studied in the Seoul national university college of music and graduated in 2013. And I am studying in master course in Royal conservatory from 2013.
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Focused Listening in Jazz Improvisation How can I create interesting musical lines by shifting my listening focus to specific instruments during improvisation? (2015) Felician Honsig-Erlenburg
Name: Felician Honsig-Erlenburg Main Subject: Jazz Saxophone Research Coach: Karst de Jong Title of Research: Processes, ways and habits of receiving jazz music Research Question: How do jazz performers listen in different situations? Summary of Results: Through a questionnaire and several interviews, findings were made in various areas of the jazz musician’s listening work: the difference between practice- and performancelistening, techniques for listening in live situations and the relevance of time and attention in the listening experience. On a practical level, this also included the experiment of performing music on a second instrument. Besides presenting an overview of the collected personal accounts, the research presentation will consist of demonstrating the impact of ways of listening on the live performance through musical examples. Biography: Felician Erlenburg was born in Klagenfurt, Austria in 1985. He studied saxophone at the Konservatorium Klagenfurt, the Berklee College of Music, and the Koninklijk Conservatorium in The Hague. Felician has also taught as a Teaching Assistant at the University of Oregon and he has been a private saxophone teacher, besides performing as a saxophonist in various jazz settings.
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'The great Dooble Basse' (2016) Carina Cosgrave
Name: Carina Cosgrave Main Subject: Violone Research Supervisor: Wouter Verschuren Title of Research: The ‘Great Dooble Basse' Research Question: How was the violone used during the 17th century in England? Summary of Results: Having thought the violone had no place in early English repertoire until the 1700s Maggie Urqhaurt introduced me to the fantasias of Orlando Gibbons written for ‘the Great dooble basse’ This was a fascinating moment in my studies as If Orlando Gibbons was music writing for the violone, and there were players and instruments in England, then which other composers may have written repertoire specifically for this instrument? In which setting would the violone have been used in? Where else might the violone have been employed? This presentation will look at evidence of the arrival and use of the violone in England up until 1700, the period between the death of Purcell (1695) and the arrival of Handel in London in 1710. Around 1700 the use of the violone declined and the lowest stringed bowed bass instruments began doubling the bass line an octave below. It will look at some specific examples from the repertoire that seems to ask for a violone as the bass instrument. Biography: Carina studied Double Bass and baroque bass with Peter Buckoke at the Royal College of Music, London, supported by a Douglas and Hilda Simmons study award. Carina’s passion for historical performance has grown since her first encounter with historical instruments performing Biber’s Battalia and has seen her continue her studies in this field with Maggie Urqhuart at the Koninklijk Conservatorium in The Hague. Carina is a founder member of the New Century Baroque orchestra and plays with early music ensembles in the UK, France and The Netherlands including the English Concert, Florilegium, Les Siècles, and La Serenissima.
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Transition from Natural Horn to Valve Horn in the 19th Century (2016) Yerang Ko
Name: Yerang Ko Main Subject: French Horn Research supervisor: Saunders, Pete Title of Research: Transition from Natural Horn to Valve Horn in the 19th Century Research Question: Why did composers in the 19th century use both natural horn and valve horn together in a single works? By the development from natural horn to valve horn, what becomes possible? Summary of Results: This paper examines the transition from natural horn to valve horn. There were many changes in this instrument in the 19th century, including different valve designs. Using analysis of compositions using both natural and valve horn it answers the questions: Why were there changes? What did this make possible for the player? What did this make possible for the composer? What are the advantages of each? The paper concludes that, although the natural horn is the ancestor of the modern horn, they remain different instruments for different musical purposes, often used together in a single composition. And modern horn players should be able to play both. The paper concludes with interviews of hornists who perform music from this period of transition, giving their views on the instruments. In the 18th century they coexisted, showing the advantages of each of them. The natural horn has a more open sound and it blends very easily with woodwinds and brass and each key of crooks gets different colors. During the early times of its use many people didn’t accept the valve system because they thought the natural horn was a more complete instrument and the sound of valve horn was not complete and was not clear. But many composers used the valve horn in their pieces, so the role of the valve horn became very important. Reasons were that the natural horn couldn’t be played in the low register and with full dynamics. And because of hand techniques, the natural horn was difficult to play in chromatic scales and with large intervals and so on. So, the natural horn was replaced by the valve horn in many pieces. Biography: I started to learn the piano when I was 8. My piano teacher’s daughter studied the horn at the College of music. My teacher suggested me to play the horn. The sound of the horn was pleased me. After deciding to start, I attended the arts middle school at the age of 13. I improved my musical talent by participating in wood quintet, brass quintet and an orchestra. Naturally, I moved on to attend a fine arts high school. I also learned various non-technical aspects of music such as musical theory and history through my high school curriculum. I participated in many competitions and also was a part of many different orchestras. At 18, I went to perform with my high school orchestra at Musikverein in Austria. It was unforgettable and I gained such a valuable experience from it.
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Tony Williams - a drummer who has changed a way of my drumming (2016) Pavol Blaho
Name: Pavol Blaho Main subject: Jazz Drums Research Coach: Yvonne Smeets Title of Research: Tony Williams - a drummer who has changed a way of my drumming Research Question: How can I through researching , transcribing and analyzing of Tony Williams became a better drummer, who is able to play more "open", react on specific moments and be more helpful - conductive for the band? My master research is fundamentally about myself and how can I become a better drummer influenced by Tony Williams. I did transctriptions of "short - licks ", drum solos and drum comping. Than I created drum exercises which are inspired by Tony Williams playing. By practising these exercises /not only/ I want to become a better drummer. These ones could be use for another drummer to study this kind of drum work. Short biography about myself: My first contact with music happened when I was 4 years old kid. It was behind the drums. When I was 9, I started to study classic clarinet on basic music school in my town. Than I went for secondary school to Conservatory in Banska Bystrica. After six years of studies at Classic Conservatory Banska Bystrica - music instument Clarinet, I decided to go to study Drums at Royal Conservatory in Den Haag. I have at least 10 years of teaching experience. In these days I am playing with Martin Uherek Quartet.
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How to apply Kodály Principles And Methods To Jazz Solfeggio And Theory Teaching In Higher Professional Music Education (2015) Erik Albjerg
Name: Erik Albjerg Main subject: Theory of Music Research coaches: Dr. László Norbert Nemes, (Liszt Academy Budapest), Mónika Benedek (Helsinki) Title of research: How to apply Kodály principles and methods to jazz solfeggio and theory teaching in higher professional music education Abstract In my teaching of jazz theory, solfeggio and ear training I will integrate elements of the Kodály concept. This in order to improve my teaching and increase the learning outcomes of the students. Despite quite some development and improvement of lessons and material over the past 15 years I see too many students having trouble combining theory and practice. Exactly in this regard I assume that the Kodály concept can offer great positive effect. Since 2009 I have become practically acquainted with the Kodály concept through several workshops, courses and 4 visits to primary schools in Hungary. From my perspective as a jazz musician and theory teacher the Kodály concept offers many valuable aspects that I will integrate: a good balance between experiencing music, musicianship skills and music theory. The musical experience is based on singing (in tune), the basic theoretical understanding is provided by solmization often combined with hand signs, and the musical material is original repertoire of master composers. Since the Kodály concept is mainly focussing on folk and classical art music, there is a challenge in applying the teaching elements to jazz music. The main research questions are: The practicality of solmization and hand signs regarding the high degree of chromaticism in melody and harmony as well as tempo in jazz music To find a form for the lesson in which improvisation and playing and are integrated as well The research will be practice based in testing the learning material and activities with jazz students. The material and experiences of this practice-based research will lead to a workbook for students and a teacher's manual in June 2015. The results of the research are manifold. It has become clear for me that it is possible to teach jazz inspired by the Kodály concept. As a teacher the change of approach is more challenging than I expected and at times it feels like a transformation. As such it is work in progress, much more has to be done. This presentation will reflect on the status quo at this moment in the process. The presentation will be a demonstration of a first year jazz theory class. Biography Erik Albjerg (Svendborg, Denmark 1972), initially studied jazz trumpet, but soon turned to Theory of Music (Jazz, BA 2000). After that he studied jazz double bass (BA 2003), all at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague. Since 1998 Erik teaches a diverse range of jazz music theory subjects for several departments. He published an article in the Dutch Journal of Music Theory on Gil Evans’s arrangement of Moon Dreams (2000). He is the co-author of several readers. He gave a presentation on the teaching of jazz harmony at the congress of the Dutch-Flemish Society for Music Theory (Antwerp 2012).
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Latin Tinge and american jazz Drumming (2015) Jacopo Zanette
Research abstract Name: Jacopo Zanette Main Subject: Jazz Drums Research coach: Jarmo Hoogendijk Title of research: “Latin tinge and american jazz drumming” Research question: -How can I expand my vocabulary in playing the latin rhythms of the american jazz tradition on the drums in order to have a concrete idea of the roots whose grooves are coming from? -What will I be able to play with them and in what situations will I use these grooves as a tool to improve my musical, compositional, technical skills? Summary of results: This research wants to prove how the latin music from central and south America influenced deeply the culture and the roots of the U.S.A jazz traditions. The gathering between the latin and jazz gave birth year by year to a new form of music that would incorporate: the innovations and difficulties of the swing and jazz world that was evolving in the US; the solid groove foundations coming from southern America. The result that was made alive by people like Dizzy Gillespie, Chano Pozo and many others was simply unbelievable. This latin tinge influence became more and more popular also in all the standards the american jazz players used to play and made them writing new compositions and arrangements using this new flavour. This book wants to go deep into the latin tinge grooves that made certain standards really peculiar and helped these songs to become something unforgettable drummingwise. The groove is the core of the music so this work aims to demonstrate how simple ideas and rhythms played in the right spot and in the right tune are everything that is needed to make the music sound good. Every groove described wants to give the drummer a reference to expand his vocabulary starting from the solid foundations that the master drummers of the XX century offered. The presntation will show how knowing history and the roots of the drumming is the most important thing to develop your own musical personality and in order to have a unique personality the basics and foundamentals of drumming should be really solid. The groove is the core and the latin tinge grooves are part of a chapter that no jazz drummer should underestimate. Biography: Jacopo Zanette (drums) Musician class '89, drummer, composer, teacher since 2010.Bachelor study in jazz drums and percussions at the Kartnerlandeskonservatorium of Klagenfurt(Austria)obtaining the degree cum laudae.In the same institute he studied musical pedagogy, obtaining a parallel degree also cum laudae.In 2010 records “Song for Jaco” with the Pordenone big band conducted by Juri Dal Dan.He Collaborates in 2012 with the austrian national radio ̈ORF in recording the cd Kuddelmuddel broadcasted in the austrian radio stations. Since 2013 lives in The Netherlands and performs in many concerts and festivals in Holland, France, Belgium,Greece and Italy playing from jazz to pop.
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Diving by heart into the music (2017) Joosep Ahun
Name: Joosep Ahun Main Subject: Viola Research Supervisor: Liesbeth Ackermans Title of Research: Diving by heart into the music Research Question: How can different analyses make me more aware and make playing by heart easier? Summary of Results: The central focus of this research has been how finding different ways to dive into the music makes playing by heart easier. To achieve that, different analyses are created, which every musician can use to increase awareness of the music on a deeper level. The analyses will create different layers of knowing the piece and by that it will ease the studying process of learning music by heart. After a short introduction of the source of the problem of playing by heart, the research considers how memory is created and looks into the possibility of the use of mind palace technique in combination with music making. Based on experiences with other repertoire, different ways of analysing are created. A case-study with George Enescu’s ‘Konzertstück’ is provided and there is outcome on how working in this way positively connects with playing by heart. Guidelines are offered, where colleagues can find several questions they can ask themselves while studying music and suggestions are given on how to work in this way. Hopefully the outcome of the research will show a method to overcome memory difficulties by diving into the heart of the music. Biography: Joosep Ahun, born 1989 in Tallinn, Estonia, started his music studies at the age of 7 in Tallinn Music High School. In 2014 he optained his Bachelor degree in Estonian Academy of Music and Theatre and from 2015 he started his Masters studies under Mikhail Zemtsov in Royal Conservatory in The Hague. High interest in orchestra playing has lead him to play in top youth orchestras in Europe, which are European Union Youth Orchestra and Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra. He has also played in Tallinn Chamber Orchestra and Estonian National Symphony Orchestra. Currently he is in the academy of The Hague Philharmonie.
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Arranging the Mystery Sonatas by H.I.F. Biber for the guitar (2016) Antero Pellikka
Name: Antero Pellikka Main Subject: Classical Guitar Research supervisor: Patrick van Deurzen Title of Research: Arranging the Mystery Sonatas by H.I.F. Biber for the guitar Research Question: What strategies can I take when arranging pieces with melody and continuo for the guitar? Research Summary: Throughout the existence of our instrument, guitarists have been arranging and transcribing music written for other instruments. Many compositions that are not originally written for the guitar have gained a place in the standard repertoire. Especially making arrangements of Baroque violin music is a long established tradition. My research aims to continue this tradition by presenting three arrangements of the Mystery Sonatas by Heinrich Biber, who was undoubtedly one of the most famous violinists and composers of the 17th century. This research describes the arranging process of these compositions and how a classical guitarist can use the basso continuo practise as a central tool when arranging pieces with melody and continuo. Some performance aspects of 17th century music will also be discussed as well as different arranging methods for the guitar. The final product of this research is the arrangements of Mystery Sonatas III, IV and V by Heinrich Biber, which show the information gathered in the research paper in practice. The presentation will go deeper into different methods I used in making these arrangements visually through PowerPoint and contain audible examples of my arrangements. Biography: Antero Pellikka (born in 1988) is a Finnish guitarist. He had his first guitar at the age of 7 and soon after that he started his guitar studies at Juvenalia Music Institute under the guidance of Esko Virtanen. After graduating from music institute Pellikka studied with Petri Kumela at the Helsinki Conservatory and Metropolia University of Applied Studies. Currently he is completing his Master’s degree at the Royal Conservatoire in the Hague under the guidance of Zoran Dukić and at Sibelius Academy in Helsinki with Jukka Savijoki.
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BECOMING A CONFIDENT SINGER AND ALEXANDER TECHNIQUE (2015) Bernadett Hegyi
Name: Bernadett Hegyi Main Subject: Classical Singing Research Coaches: Gerda van Zelm, Fiona Tree Title of Research: Becoming a Confident Singer and Alexander Technique Research Question: How can Alexander Technique help build a singer's confidence? Summary of Results: One thing that a singer must not lack is self-confidence. Acting and singing at the same time can be crucial for singers, especially because excessive focus on many things can be disadvantageous. I also had the impression from talks with my colleagues that a lack of confidence was very common among young artists. My goal was to understand more about the body as a singer's instrument, and to gain control over my behaviour and misuse of the body on stage and to get more self-confidence through practising Alexander Technique. My research revealed that while there is a definite connection between Alexander Technique and confidence, it is very difficult at this point in time to identify exactly how and why. To have examples of different opinions, I interviewed teachers and students. I applied their and my own discoveries and information to my own individual Alexander Technique practice and singing lessons. In this research paper I have shared the experiences, summaries, interviews and lesson observations I have engaged in. Biography: Bernadett Hegyi was born in Hungary. The young soprano started her music education in Budapest and the University of Pécs Faculty of Music. Since 2009 she has been studying in The Netherlands to continue her studies in the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague to keep mastering her knowledge and talent with her renowned singing teacher, Sasja Hunnego. She developed her skills from Éva Lax, Marianna Váradi, Rita Dams and Andrew Schroeder. She is a member of various choirs and ensembles, and she sings baroque music and contemporary music as a soloist. She has worked with Gijs Leenaars, Daan Admiraal, Rob Vermeulen, Pietro Rizzo, Michal Alber and Peter van Heyghen conductors. Nowadays she mainly focuses on high coloratura soprano repertoire.
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Art song in Eastern Europe (2016) Veronique van der Meijden
Name: Veronique van der Meijden Main Subject: Classical Voice Research supervisor: Gerda van Zelm Title of Research: Art Song in Eastern Europe - An inquiry into forgotten vocal repertoire Research Question: What is the repertoire in specified countries between 1820 and now? Summary of Results Eastern Europe holds a treasure chest of art song. Unfortunately much of this repertoire has been hidden from us for a very long time. This research gives a taste of what music is available to us. The countries discussed are Poland, Greece, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, and Bosnia. Each country is represented by the most important songs and cycles. Every song contains a description of musical aspects and socio-historic context. This research was conducted by collecting scores from various sources, studying and in some cases performing them. This is supported by a research into the socio-historic context in which these songs were composed. This has resulted into a preliminary reference work for singers interested to perform this repertoire in recitals themselves. Biography: Veronique van der Meijden (1992), mezzo alto, is an exciting young artist at home in various fields of classical singing. With a deep passion in unknown repertoire she is a voice for forgotten music from Eastern Europe. Current projects include participating in the opera Koeien (by Misha Mengelberg and Guus Janssen), a duo with guitarist Jelena Ratković, and performances of Arabic art song with percussionist Sattar al-Saadi. Veronique holds a great affinity for contemporary music, regularly performing works by young composers such as Cristiano Melli, Leonie Roessler, and Peter Kerkelov. She is currently finishing her master studies with Frans Fiselier and Gemma Visser.
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Discovering the bowing techniques for articulation in Jazz (2016) Bernardo Sacconi
Name: Bernardo Sacconi Main Subject: Jazz Double Bass Research Supervisor: Yvonne Smeets Title of Research: Discovering the bowing techniques for the articulation in jazz Research Question: How can I use the classical bowing technique in order to create exercises for practicing swing phrasing within a Jazz Solo with the bow? Summary of Results: The double bass has mostly been played with the “Pizzicato” technique throughout history the history of jazz, even though some famous bassists in the 30s and 40s were incorporating the bow in their solos in order to explore different sound possibilities. My methodology is to write bowing articulation over the transcriptions of five solos, two by tenor saxophone-players and three by bass-players, in order to sound as close as possible to the original and then I wrote five bowing-examples that could be used as an exercise to practice some of the lines in the transcriptions. Biography: I was born in Florence (Italy) on December 1989 and I grew up in a family where my father and my brother were both electric bass players and I started playing guitar and bass on my fifteenth birthday. I graduated at the Conservatory of Florence “Luigi Cherubini” in Jazz arrangement “Cum Lauda” and composition with Riccardo Fassi, Barend Middelhoff and Stefano Zenni and at the Royal Conservatoire in Double Bass with Janos Bruneel, Roelof Meijer, Clemens van der Feen, Tony Overwater and getting workshops with Renaud Garcia Fons, Dominic Seldis, Panagiotis Andreou, Eddie Gomez, Anders Jormin, Paolino Dalla Porta, Furio Di Castri, Omer Avital, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Nicholas Walter and others.
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An analysis and realization of André Jolivet's Deux etudes de Concert for solo guitar (2016) Leo Sorlin
Name: Leo Sörlin Main subject: Guitar Research supervisor: Enno Voorhorst Title of research: An analysis and realization of André Jolivet's Deux Etudes de Concert for solo guitar. The ambition of this research was to study André Jolivet's Deux Etudes de Concert (1965) for solo guitar with the ambition to find out how he responded to the nature of the guitar when he composed the piece. This was done with the help of two research questions: 1. When composing Deux Etudes de Concert, how did Jolivet respond to the nature of the instrument? 2. In what ways can I justify my performance, based on my knowledge of the instrument combined with my musical analysis of the piece? A thorough analysis with this focus results in a couple of located instances – with varying level of certainty – where adaptation is believed to been made. Being unfamiliar with the guitar, the influences from the instrument that were found during the analysis couldn't always be realized to its fullest potential. In the second part of this research the problems of realizing the score were adressed. Some of the focused spots required certain solutions, and the correspondence with the analysis gave an opportunity to value different aspects of the music. The effects of this research resulted in motivated solutions for the difficult problems encountered in the piece, as well as an understanding for how Jolivet's influences by the guitar shows itself in the music. Keywords: Guitar, André Jolivet, adaptation, realization, analysis.
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Prof. Dr. Dobri Paliev: traditions and innovations (2015) Kostja Napolov
Name: Konstantyn Napolov Main Subject: Classical Percussion Research Coaches: Paul Scheepers Title of Research: Prof. Dr. Dobri Paliev: traditions and innovations Research Question: Who is Prof. Dr. Dobri Paliev? Germany, France, Luxembourg, USSR, China - is this the complete list of countries which were influenced by Dobri Paliev’s exploring of percussion instruments? What exactly where his innovations? What do we know, and what materials can we find, about one of the most important percussion ensembles - “Polyrhythmia” which was founded and led by Dobri Paliev? Who are the contemporaries that inherited the legacy of Paliev’s, to which he devoted his entire life? Summary of Results: My interest in the personality of Prof. Dr. Dobri Paliev had been growing since my first rhythmic lessons at the music school in Odessa, Ukraine. I was 6 years old at the time. My teacher presented to me one of Paliev’s early works on a folk theme, and I was completely fascinated by rhythmic patterns, time signatures, changing of colours and simply beauty of the dance melodies. That was truly an unforgettable experience. That is why during my Master program at the Kiev National Music Academy in 2009 I decided to focus my entire energy on one of the most important figures when it comes to percussion instruments development and, generally, music in the 20th - 21st century. However, less than two years ago, when I was choosing the topic for my master research at the Royal Conservatory of The Hague, it became clear to me that I had not finished exploring the legacy which was created by Prof. Dr. Dobri Paliev and his followers. Therefore I started to research more about his private live, him as a composer, his performing activities. I was captivated by different qualities of this great personality. With this research I aim to provide answers based on unique facts, stories, video, audio, photo materials, live interviews and analysis of the famous works written by Dobri Paliev for his percussion ensemble “Polyrhythmia” and other world famous ensembles and systematic courses. Biography: Konstantyn Napolov (1987) received his Bachelor (cum laude) from the Royal Conservatoire in 2013. With his Percussion -Trio 'Davai Perkusion' Konstantyn he won the first prize during the Grachtenfestival Concours at Royal Concertgebouw Amsterdam. Twice he ended up as a finalist of the Kamermuziek Concours Almere, IPC Luxembourg, and won the first prize at 'Oh,Oh Intro' – popfestival The Hague. During his first year of Master he was accepted to do his Erasmus-study at the conservatory with the oldest percussion traditions – Cité de la Musique et de la Danse Conservatoire de Strasbourg with Emmanuel Séjourné. Together with Steve Reich, Kaija Saariaho, Martijn Padding, Unsuk Chin, John Luther Adams, Philippe Manoury (in person) he is working on solo and chamber music repertoire. Since 2014 Konstantyn Napolov is Haupt-Pauker (principal-percussionist) at Mannheimer Philharmoniker (Germany).
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Finding the proper musical character in the case of Allegro in Germany, 1717-1750 (2016) Fumiko Morie
Name: Fumiko Morie Main subject: Baroque Violin Research supervisor: Bart van Oort Title: Finding the proper musical character in the case of Allegro in Germany, 1717-1750 Research question: To find the correct character is one of the biggest problem for us, musicians. In this paper I suggest how to find them.
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Evolution of the trombone in Portugal in the last 20 years (2017) Ricardo Manuel Pinheiro Almeida
Name: Ricardo Manuel Pinheiro Almeida Main Subject: Classical Bass Trombone Research Supervisor: Pete Saunders Title of Research: Evolution of the trombone in Portugal in the last 20 years Research Question: How did this happen? Positive and negative points Summary of Results: This paper looks at the situation concerning Portuguese trombone players who have left their home country to study or work abroad and is written by a member of that growing community. It looks at the circumstances in Portugal over the last 20 years that have led to this exodus, and studies through interviews and a questionnaire what the consequences, both good and bad, have been for those who have taken this step. In this research certain aspects will be approached such as the importance of the bands in the development of the musician, the incentives created so that there were a growing number of students of music or analysis made to the number of music schools created in this space of time. Biography: Ricardo Almeida was born on May 21, 1990. He began his musical studies at the age of 15 in the Band of his city Seia Band. At the age of 16 he joined the music conservatory of Seia. In 2010 he started his career at ESART (Escola Superior de Artes Aplicadas) - Castelo Branco, where he graduated in 2013 and joined the Master's Degree in Education that same year. In the year of 2015 he entered the Royal Conservatoire of The Hague in the Master in Performance. He was a member of JOP - Young Portuguese Orchestra in the year 2014. In 2016 he was part of the IFFR - International Film Festival Rotterdam project. He also collaborated with Orquestra XXI in the year 2016 and with the ESART Orchestra as a student of this institution.
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Contemporary Percussion Education (2016) Antonio Pierna Garcia
Name: Antonio Pierna Research supervisors: Patrick van Deurzen and Ewan Gibson. Title of the research: Contemporary Percussion Education Research questions: -How is the situation of contemporary classical percussion education today? -What are the possibilities of teaching contemporary classical music to young children? Summary of results: In 2014 when I started teaching music to two young students, I started questioning myself what were my possibilities to teach contemporary music to them. I realized that I didn't had that kind of training in my former education so I decided to discover if this could be a general problem. After analyzing some ideas and projects done on this topic, I created different activities based on different pieces from the repertoire of my Master, using two big topics: John Cage and electronic music. I tried the activities with my students and the result was very satisfactory. This and the perception of a lack of contemporary music in the educational system, encourages me to continue discovering the possibilities of contemporary music education for young students. Format of presentation: research paper. Biography: Antonio Pierna was born in Valladolid (Spain) in 1991. During his percussion studies at the Conservatorio Superior de Música de Castilla y León, he developed his interest in orchestral and contemporary music and collaborated with professional orchestras like Orquesta Sinfónica de Castilla y Leon and Orquesta Sinfónica de Galicia. In 2011 he started at The Royal Conservatory of The Hague (KC), where he finished his Bachelor in 2014 and where he corrently studies an orchestral master, together with the Residentie Orkest. Antonio has collaborated with Slagwerk Den Haag, Asko Schoenberg, Ludwig Ensemble or the Eighteen Century Orchestra.
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LMA (Laban movement analysis) in music (2015) Maya Felixbrot
Research of LMA with focus on Effort factors. in a thorough different perspectives of experiencing music
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The Effective Drummer from a Melodical Point of View (2016) Thomas de Visser
Name: Thomas de Visser Main Subject: Jazz Drums Research Supervisor: Patrick Schenkius Title of Research: The effective drummer from a melodical point of view Research Question: How can I become a more effective but melodic musician in smaller ensembles and big band, inspired by the playing of Shelly Manne? Summary of Results: As a drummer with great interest towards effective but melodic playing, I have been trying to improve my approach to creating supportive accompaniment and melodic solos. Shelly Manne, in particular came to my attention because he accomplished just that in his playing. Tangible research results: 1. I improved my playing by making rhythms based on melodies instead of melodies made of rhythms. 2. My conception of time keeping changed and became stronger. 3. My brush playing improved unexpectedly as a side effect of researching Shelly Manne. 4. I became more in control of my sound, more secure in taking risks, and more secure in leaving open spaces in my improvisation because of this research. Biography Thomas de Visser is a Dutch drummer who specializes in jazz whilst also having stage and studio experience in a large variety of music styles. Thomas is currently living in The Hague and worked his way into the Dutch music scene. He is currently a sideman and bandleader, touring throughout the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany and other European countries. In addition, he recently played concerts in the south of Brazil with the Marcio Philomena guitar trio.
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Mechanical and human performance on Ligeti's second book of "Études pour piano” (2015) Juan Miguel Moreno Camacho
Main Subject: Classical Piano Research Coach: Andrew Wright Title of Research: Mechanical and human performance of Ligeti's second book of Études pour piano Research Question: What should be our perspective as performers playing or practising a piece by a composer? Summary of Results: In 2006, when I was sixteen, I listened to Claudio Martínez Menher playing some etudes by a composer who had just passed away two months before: Ligeti. I remember I was very impressed with his music: a fluency of notes in ppp characterized by an amazing effervescence and strange accentuation, which sometimes develops to fff range while going up and up in the keyboard. Practicing this music I feel like it represents building a complex machine with a very precise mechanism... somehow nonhuman, very mechanical... I used to like a lot this kind of working time on the piano. Nevertheless, I felt a bit shocked about the idea of enjoying music being a mechanical part of it. What should be our perspective as performers playing or practicing a piece by a composer? I realized very soon that there is not a general answer for this question, it depends a lot on what composer we are playing and, furthermore, performers have a proper perspective of what is music for their self. I have focused my research in the second book of Etudes pour piano by Giörgy Ligeti because it contains etudes between numbers 7 and 14. Giörgy Ligeti did pianola version of etudes number 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14-A together with Jürgen Hocker. He introduced small differences at the score of pianola and pianist version. Moreover, as we can easily guess, the musical result of the performance of both versions are really different. The premier of Ëtude number 9, “Vertige”, was made using a pianola. Furthermore, first version of Étude number 14 is so complex that, together with this first version, whose title is Étude 14A “Coloana fârâ sfârsit”, Ligeti did a simplified version: The Étude 14, “Columna infinitâ”. At the score of Étude 14A, Ligeti indicated this piece is composed “for player piano (ad. lib. live pianist)”, and he wrote, “played presto as prescribed this version is best performed on a mechanical piano (or on a Yamaha Disklavier). With appropriate preparation, a performance by a live pianist is also possible”. Biography: Born in Malaga, Spain 1989, Juan Miguel Moreno Camacho started his piano studies at the age of seven with Gordana Komericki. He continued his studies with Ángel Sanzo at the Badajoz Conservatoire where he obtained his Bachelor Degree. Afterwards, Juan Miguel had regular masterclasses in Alcala de Henares with Josep Colom (2011), and at Musikeon with Luca Chiantore (2012). Furthermore, he has had masterclasses with Joaquin Soriano, Oxana Yablonskaya, Jacques Rouvier, France Clidat, Imre Rohmann, Andrzej Jasinsky, Claudio Martínez Menher, among others. Juan Miguel currently studies at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague with David Kuijken, and composition with Martijn Padding.
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The "Haagse School" and Clarinet (2016) Vincent Martig
Name: Vincent Martig Main Subject: Classical Clarinet Research supervisor: Herman Jeurissen Title of Research: The "Haagse School" and Clarinet Research Question: “How did the Haagse School develop, and which compositions for clarinet did it bring forth?” Summary of Results After the second World War, something was growing in the Dutch compositional landscape: a reaction to Schoenberg and the romantic music on the one hand, and the American minimalism on the other. This reaction obtained its clearest form at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague, with first Kees van Baaren and his students, and later Louis Andriessen with his fellow composers and his ensembles (Hoketus, for example). Because of the string characteristics of this reaction, the composition department in The Hague was labelled the “Haagse School”, but in my paper, I investigate how these characteristics are merely superficial, and there is a much broader view to the Haagse School than you would expect. Afterwards, I look at the list of clarinet compositions from The Hague, just to see that there are not many, and the ones we have, are very difficult to obtain (both recordings and sheet music). Making these pieces more well known might also give a stimulus to new composers from The Hague, to write for clarinet. For this paper I had e-mail contact and interviews with several composers and musicologists who were (remotely) connected to The Hague and its composition department. Biography: Vincent Martig started playing the clarinet when he was eight years old. Since August 2012, Vincent has been studying at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague, now in 2nd year Master, with Pierre Woudenberg. In conservatory and student orchestras, Vincent played under Jac van Steen, Susanna Mälkki, and Valery Gergiev. He received masterclasses from Chen Halevi, Ralph Manno, and Olivier Patey. In recent years, Vincent has also taken up composing, arranging, and conducting.
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Test scores for research (2015) Suzanne Konings
These scores are used for testing the hypotheses in the research-project "What's in a name?"
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Portugese Polyphony XVI Century (2019) André Cruz
Name: André Cruz Main Main Subject: Early Music Singing Research Supervisor: Kate Clark Title of Research: Portuguese polyphony XVI century Research Question: What was the position of Portugal in XVI century European musical production? Summary of Results: Portugal was maybe not as important as Italy and the Low Countries on a matter of produced works, but nonetheless, Portugal did develop quite a great quantity of quality works, and was fundamental in the spreading of the polyphony and sacred music on a global scale, into three different continents, outside of Europe. 
 Biography: André Cruz (1988), tenor and choir conductor, born in Lisbon, started at a young age with piano but quickly dove into choir music. At the age of seventeen, André started with conducting and a year later began his singing studies at the conservatory in Lisbon. In 2012 he started his choir conducting bachelor education at the Conservatory of Utrecht under the guidance of Rob Vermeulen and gave his final bachelor exam in 2016. At the moment he is doing his master education in early music singing with Rita Dams, Dorothea Mields, Peter Kooij, Robin Blaze and Pascal Bertin at Royal Conservatoire in The Hague. At the end of 2016, André took part in a joint project between Royal Conservatoire and The Juilliard School of Music, resulting in a series of concerts both in the United States of America And the Netherlands under the baton of Ton Koopman. André has been/is a member of several choirs such as Lisboa Cantat Symphonic and Chamber choir, Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation choir, Bachkoor Holland and 'The Sixteen' and performed, both as a chorister and as a soloist, with several other conductors such as Michel Corboz, Philippe Herreweghe, Harry Christopher and Gustavo Dudamel. In addition to his studies, André conducts the classical mixed choir Amsterdamse Händelvereniging, the choir of Church of Our Saviour, and the pop female choir 'The Lipsticks'.
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Nomos Alpha of Iannis XENAKIS for cello solo : guide for performers (2019) Josquin Buvat
Name: Josquin Buvat Main subject: Cello Supervisor: Patrick van Deurzen Master circle leader: Martin Prchal Title: Nomos Alpha of Iannis Xenakis: guide for performers Research question: how build one's interpretation of Nomos Alpha ? And practice it? Summary of result: Today, Nomos Alpha (1965-66) is greeted with loud applause each time it is performed. And the piece is considered one of the greatest pieces of the 20th century's cello solo repertoire, still it's also one of most difficult and “avant-gardiste”. Furthermore, the piece remains 'Difficult' for the listener: it is submerged in the torrent of 144 micro-events, an extreme fragmentation accentuated by the presence of many silences. That's why Nomos is only rarely played. Since the piece's creation in 1966, lot of cellists were aware of the existence of Nomos Alpha. Many cellists had the score, but hardly anyone played it. It seemed important to me to begin my research with an analysis of the piece and an explanation of the historical musical context of that time. Indeed, Nomos alpha is one of Xenakis’s most ‘formalised’ pieces, the structure and all the parameters are calculated down to the last details. For cellists, these knowledges are essential to understanding the piece and making the necessary choices to build its interpretation of Nomos Alpha. In last the last part of this research, I have maked a guide for performers for the cellist who would like to play Nomos Alpha. For this guide I will try to concentrate on some essentials aspects of the piece for the performers. To illustrate this guide I did an critic comparative analysis of the different versions of the piece. And finally to complete this guide I did some videos of tutorials on how to practice the piece. Biography  After completing his studies at Pôle Supérieur Paris Boulogne-Billancourt in Michel Strauss's cello class, as well as his Bachelor's degree in Musicology at Paris-Sorbonne University, Josquin Buvat continued his studies in a Master's degree in Performance at the Koninklijk Conservatorium Den Haag. Josquin gives a special place to modern music and contemporary creation in his repertoire. Since 2017, he has been a member of the Nomos ensemble, with which he has appeared at several festivals, including the Presences festival at Radio France, a concert that will be recorded. He performs regularly in chamber music as well as in orchestra, with Les Siècles, Ensemble Appasionato, Ensemble A-letheia the OJIF, the JOEHB. In addition to his musical activities Josquin is also involved in the field of associations, for two years including one as President of the Students Office of the PSPBB.
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Prince Andery Volkonsky : his influence on the Russian early music movement in the late 20th and early 21st century (2019) Anastasiya Akinfina
what is the role of Prince Andrey Volkonsky in reviving the performance of early music in Russia? what are the consequences of his activities (currently)
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Continuum (2019) Tiziano Teodori
Through an experimental approach this work aims to find new interpretations to existing music works and aesthetic solutions to the cohabitation in the music field of two disciplines in continue evolution: early music and electronic music. Which behavior have to follow two music genres in order to create an homogeneous and undestandble unite? How can they talk together to the audience?
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Chopin's Fingerlings (A consideration of Chopin’s technique with his fingerings) (2019) Shintaro Kawahara
What is Chopin’s technique with his fingerlings compared to existing ones before Chopin? How do they work on the keyboard with your body?
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Verdi meets China (2019) Kun Qian
How can mastering techniques from European Opera, specifically Verismo repertoire such as Verdi, help a bass baritone to sing Contemporary Chinese Opera more uniquely?
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Embodiment and Empowerment: Karlheinz Stockhausen's "ORCHESTER-FINALISTEN" (2019) Elisabeth Lusche
"Karlheinz Stockhausen's 'ORCHESTER-FINALISTEN': Musical Embodiment and Empowerment" is a research into the preparation and performance of Stockhausen's "ORCHESTER-FINALISTEN" from "MITTWOCH aus LICHT." This project seeks to identify specific links between music and personal identity and create a toolkit for performers to become empowered in their own bodies on stage. This research takes for its main study subjects the cast of "ORCHESTER-FINALISTEN" for the 2019 "aus LICHT" production of the Koninklijk Conservatorium, Dutch National Opera, Holland Festival, and Stockhausen Stiftung. Through interviews, rehearsal observation, and personal experience, this project will investigate how preparing and performing "ORCHESTER-FINALISTEN" changes the relationship between music and its performer in terms of embodiement and empowerment. This research will also isolate specific techniques for studying, teaching, and rehearsing "ORCHESTER-FINALISTEN" for future productions.
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From piano to keyboard playing Klavierstüke XV by K. Stockhausen (2019) Ivan Pavlov
Summary of Research: My aim in this research is to document the path of how I learned to play multible keyboards and pedals, from the perspective of piano player and was it beneficial for playing piano. From my childhood to present days, I’m learning how to play piano, to master the subtleties of the keys and pedals. Recently I had the wonderful opportunity to dive in the repertoire of k. Stockhausen. In particular one special work from him; Klavierstüke XV from LICHT. Working for 6 months on the Klavierstüke, I had to learn to play on 3 keyboards and use 4-5 pedals, to be present in building the sounds, which software to use and many technical challenges that were essential for preparing this piece. Klavierstüke XV is complex piece, I don't want to get in the technical aspect of it, only to document the challenges which I faced in the process of discovering the piece. Along this process I had to make a decision of how to divide all the sounds along the keyboards, what is the easiest and more comfortable for me. From the perspective of a piano player who never played on more then one manual/keyboard/ogran and etc. was challenge, that I would like to share, document in my research. Through what process I went to make myself comfortable with different keyboards. The challenge to coordinate my feed, to expend my mind to think in more then one aspect of playing. All this improved my player in different aspects, simply because my mental space expanded to control more then one keyboard, more then one pedal.
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Juraj Stanik -Exploring registers in the art of comping (2019) Juraj Stanik
How does the use of different registers relate to the art of comping at the piano in jazz?
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Representing Birdsong in Messiaen's Organ Music (2019) J.P.T. Lanooy
Birdsong plays an important part within the complete oeuvre of Olivier Messiaen. In the majority of his works, he incorporated songs and calls of real-life birds. In this exposition, the accuracy of those bird incorporations is investigated through analyzing two birds of the 'Communion' of the 'Messe de la Pentecôte': the blackbird and nightingale, In other words, to what extent Messiaen's 'musical' birds correspond to their real-life counterparts? Besides, I have discussed how to represent those birds on a Dutch eighteenth-century organ and which compromises you have to make with regard to organ stops.
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The song of “Charan Manopetch” for classical guitar (2019) Worrapat Yansupap
Name: Worrapat Yansupap   Main Subject: Classical Guitar   Supervisor: Enno Voorhorst   Title of Research: The song of “Charan Manopetch” for classical guitar Research Question: How can we arrange Thai folk music to the classical guitar repertoire by using the song of “Charan Manopetch” and preserve the original characteristics? Summary of Results:  I choose the format exposition. Being a classical guitarist from Thailand, I would like my audience to get aquatinted with the beautiful music from my home country. With this in mind the final result of this study is an arrangement of a famous Thai folksong for classical guitar duo. To have a result that justifies the nature of this music with all of its qualities I needed to research the characteristics of this music, the instruments used as well as the purpose and social context. A challenge was the translating from the sound of the various original instruments to one instrument, the classical guitar. For this, I used the classical techniques but had to find also some unorthodoxy solutions to capture the spirit of my land of birth. As a result of my findings, I plan to conduct a new research study in order to appropriately and internationally promote the Thai folk music.   Biography: Worrapat started playing the guitar when he was nine years old. His first teacher was Samai Tosoongnern. In 2007 he studied electric guitar with Panom Krahan and two years later also with Anucha Patanaratanamole. In 2010 he studied classical guitar with Leon Koudelak at College of Music, Mahidol University. Currently, he studies with Zoran Dukic at Koninklijk Conservatorium (Royal Conservatory) in the Netherlands. Still, he enjoys spending too much time with the electric guitar and enjoys singing in a death metal band. Worrapat has won many prizes such as:  1st prizes at the Thailand International Guitar Festival 2015, the Asia International Guitar Festival 2015, the TGS Guitar Competition 2015, the Pattaya International Guitar Festival 2014 and many more international awards. 
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Changing Approaches to the Interpretation of Chopin's Piano Works. (2019) Lorenzo Laguna Ortega
At the end of the 19th century, methods of recording sound appeared, but it was not until the beginning of the 20th century that the technical quality of these recordings was advanced enough to allow us to fully appreciate the musical performances they captured. In the approximately 100 years of recordings that have since passed, performances by the world's best pianists have been preserved—forming a kind of canon of 'definitive' interpretations. The world has plenty changed since the beginning of the 20th century, and this has inevitably influenced how piano music has been interpreted, especially though not exclusively as a result of globalization, whereby understandings of ‘standard performances’ of various repertoires have gained strength, leading to fewer personal and divergent interpretations. This phenomenon is partly due to the fact that nowadays the training of pianists is hugely focused on competitions, where a 'right' and 'indisputable' approach to performance is demanded. How can studying the evolution of performance approaches to Chopin's Four Scherzos for piano over the past 100 years via the study of recordings, performance history and wider musical trends, help modern pianists to create new and more personal approaches to playing this repertoire? Being aware of this changes and make an exhaustive analysis of recordings of the entire last century can give us as performers a lot of valuable information with the aim of developing a more informed and even more free performance, getting rid of any dogma.
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F. A. Hoffmeister Viola Concerto - Getting the inspiration for historically-informed performance. (2018) Maria Kropotkina
The main goal of this research was to figure out how can the study of the features of classical style give me more insight on how to make a faithful interpretation? Through the methods of content analysis I have found which topics were discussed and considered important from mid-18th century to mid-19th century. These topics were then systematized and placed in tables, compared and placed in one common table. Then scores were marked as close as possible to L. Mozart’s intentions, L. Spohr’s intentions and the score I used before (marked before my research). After that, these were practiced and recorded. Comparing the scores has brought me to some conclusions, differences between my playing and the requests of the masters. These were all the basic features of the classical style, which can be applied to my interpretation in theory. With the practicing and recording methods, I could choose more objectively which features of classical style, which I shall apply to my interpretation (the ones listed as an answer to the third sub-question). Theoretically speaking, regarding the tempo – I have always practiced perfect tempo keeping with the metronome and never even considered the fact of slowing down, let alone accelerating in furious passages. The dynamics marked in my score are similar to what is in L. Mozart and L. Spohr versions. I had never accentuated first of the slurred notes and then made a diminuendo, as L. Mozart asks. One difference, however, was in the dolce section in which I used to play a quasi- polyphonic setting in which both piano and forte was used. Mozart and Spohr would play dolce in a soft, ingratiating. The bowings in my version are more versatile and in a way continue L. Spohr’s tradition of slowly leaving behind the down beat down bow tradition so present in L. Mozart’s Versuch. Regarding the usage of my bow, through Spohr’s Violinschule I have rediscovered the upper half of the bow. For instance, I always played the detasche bowing in the middle part of the bow, unlike Spohr suggests (upper third). My fingerings version was almost the same as the L. Spohr’s version and quite different from L. Mozart’s version. Being able to use the open string and flageolets is truly helpful. Though, according to some, the usage of the harmonics when playing orchestra auditions with this concerto should be somewhat limited. (Kugel, 2014) Before analyzing the two violin schools, I have used different ornamentation, which was marked in my score. (Hoffmeister F. A., 1996) For example in bar 41 Music Well edition that I was using asks for a trill, while Henle edition only marks a turn. Also, it has before never occurred to me to even consider adding some embellishments myself. After reading L. Mozart’s Versuch, I am much more confident to add the embellishments, as well as to treat the vibrato (tremolo) as an embellishment, which should be added only on long notes. Practically speaking, I have made different choices for my interpretation. This new interpretation is a mixture of both violin methods and it represents the classical features that I shall apply to the performance practice because of their musical consequences.19 I have often found it somewhat hard to understand what exactly the classical style is. But, in my opinion, with such little improvements as mentioned earlier in this section, one can get closer to the style. As we know, playing in a correct style has gained more and more importance in the last century (Scherman, n.d.), and the audition setting asks for it as well. (Lebrecht, 2014) What still should be done to improve the clarity of the research is to apply the topics that I have extracted in the tables on the whole concerto. Also, there is definitely room for improvement in the embellishments section. In my research, there was no place for a thorough study of all embellishments that L. Mozart had stated. Such study and its application on the whole of Hoffmeister concerto would be of great importance to its understanding. Also, a study of the difference between the L. Mozart’s Versuch and L. Spohr’s Violinschule could bring great insight to how violin technique changed from mid-18th century to mid-19th century. I consider my common table as a good beginning of the study. To conclude, I hope my research will bring some clarity to the young colleagues who wish to have more information on the Hoffmeister Viola Concerto, as it did for me. Especially I wish it to be a guide for putting down bowings, choosing fingerings, adding and performing embellishments. If but one wondering violist is somewhat helped, I shall be pleased.
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Horn Auditioning in Holland, Germany, Austria and Belgium (2019) Hendrik Marinus
Name: Hendrik Marinus Main subject: Horn Research Supervisor: Pete Saunders Title of Research: Horn auditions in Holland, Germany, Austria and Belgium. Research Question: What is the difference in playing an audition for orchestras in Holland, Germany, Austria and Belgium? Summary of Results: An orchestra audition might be the most unnatural situation for a musician, yet it is the only way to get a position in an orchestra. The player has a few minutes to show his best capacities, and lots of times dozens of musicians audition for only one position. I did quite some auditions in Holland and abroad. Sometimes with good results, sometimes less good. The feedback afterwards is different every time, which made me wondering: in what way do I need to adjust to what the jury wants to hear? This research focuses on horn auditions in Holland, Germany, Austria and Belgium. It consists a part about history and traditions from the most prominent orchestras in these countries. Also, I interviewed horn players who are auditioning and horn players who are playing in orchestras in these countries and I took lessons with some of them. This research ends with a guide for horn players who are interested in auditions in the countries mentioned above, which contains repertoire and more information. Biography: Hendrik Marinus is freelance horn player and conductor. Currently, he studies horn and orchestra master with Herman Jeurissen at the Royal Conservatory and the Residentie Orkest. In Groningen, he finished bachelors in both french horn with Frank Brouns and Wind Band Conducting with Tijmen Botma. Hendrik is member of the European Brass Ensemble and is substitute player in various professional orchestras in Holland, such as Noord Nederlands Orkest, Ballet Orkest, Philharmonie Zuid Nederland and Marinierskapel der Koninklijke Marine.
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Harmonic awareness for drummers (2019) Jasper Hilgerink
Jasper Hilgerink Jazz Drums Jarmo Hoogendijk Harmonic Awareness for Drummers Will studying the tension and release points of chord progressions in jazz standards result in better melodic drum solos? This exposition contains the research and result of a study into the development of better melodic drums solos through a number of analysis and experiments. Taking inspiration from a selection of legendary historic jazz drummers including Max Roach, Philly Joe Jones and Shelly Manne. A strong focus on chord progressions, specifically the chordal analysis of five jazz standards leads to a clear visualisation of the tension and release points of the harmonic structure. The next step of this process is creating this tension and release on the drums to match the chord structure. This is accomplished through recording, experimentation and creating exercises. These results are presented in the master symposium through live performance of the selected standards and demonstrations of the exercises. The presentation will also include an explanation of the process using visual tools, explanations and examples of the styles of the researched historic drummers. Short Biography: My name is Jasper Hilgerink, born in Almelo, the Netherlands, 25-10-1994. From a young age I was exposed to lots of music in and outside the house. I went out with my family to see my dad perform in the local bigband, concertband and funkbands. When I reached the age of 9 I started picking up the clarinet. This was my first proper music education. 7 years later i picked up the tenor saxophone and that's when I start to listen and play my first jazz standards. By the time I wanted to study at a conservatoire, I couldn't deny my love for the drums, having played the instrument since the age of 6. I started my studies at ArtEZ Zwolle, school of arts on drums in the course Jazz&Pop. In the meantime I devoloped myself in a performing artist & part time teacher. After the bachelors in Zwolle, I started the Masters program in the Royal Conservatoire, the Hague
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the principal cellist (2019) Liesbeth Bosboom
Name: Liesbeth Bosboom Main subject: cello Supervisor: Stefan Petrovic Mastercircle leader: Janet Krause Title: The principal cellist Research question: What does one need to be an effective principal cellist in a symphony orchestra? Over the past few years I have played in several orchestra’s as a tutti player but also as sectional leader. As a tutti player I noticed that there are a lot of different leaders. Some leaders moved a lot while playing, others almost didn’t move. Some showed a lot of entrances, others almost none. Some gave a lot of remarks during the rehearsals and others didn’t say anything. Some of them where open to suggestions from the group, others only wanted to do it their way. When I was leader myself, I sometimes didn’t feel very secure because I didn’t know what exactly was my role. I took this research as an opportunity to found this out. First of all, I did literature research, and soon I realized that not so many people wrote about this subject. Next to the few articles I read about sectional leaders in orchestra, I studied some articles about leadership in general and I tried to apply the results I found in those articles on my specific subject: leadership in orchestra. Second, I made interviews with conductors, tutti cellists and solo cellists from different orchestras and asked them about their opinion on a lot of things. For example, about the tasks of a principal, the way a principal should communicate with their section, other leaders and the conductor, and the way a principal cellist should be giving remarks to the section. As a result, I got a clear overview of the do’s and don’ts of a principal cellist. Biography Liesbeth (1995) studies with Michel Strauss and Jan-Ype Nota at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague. When she was 12 years old, she was accepted at the Prince Claus Conservatory. First in the Young Talent Class with Corine ‘t Hoen, then for bachelor with Jan-Ype Nota, which she finished with a 10. Currently, she is following an orchestra master program with the Residentie Orchestra. Also, she is substitute cellist at the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra. Starting from a very young age, she won prizes various national competitions. As a soloist Liesbeth played with several student- and professional orchestras in Holland and abroad.
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Resonance Training For Musicians (2019) Samuel Santana
Resonance training is a technique which has the purpose to use our body in connection to our instrument. This can be developed in a progressive way with a number of exercises which are documented by Thomas Lange. In general lines we seek to find the center of gravity in our body and potentiate its possibilities. The result would be a general sensation of freedom and at the same time independence of our body on the search of our artistic expression while performing. Liberty and trust in our body as our given instrument rather than uptightness with it.
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Identity, Interaction and Joy of Playing. The Conductor-less Phenomenon (2019) Ana Termeulen
In this research the author analyses nine cases of conductor-less orchestras ranging from Persimfans in the Soviet Union in the 1920s to Nordic Harmony in Norway in our times. In size these nine cases vary from relatively small ensembles to big symphonic orchestras. They were studied in different ways: through diaries, literature, films and documentaries, and personal interviews with the musicians. Between these nine orchestras there are significant differences but at the same time big similarities.
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Tuba and tuba player role in the orchestra (2019) Giedrius Steponaitis
There is not much written information which tells tuba players how to overcome the challenges that await them in the symphony orchestra. Now, when professional skills of performers are increased, it is very important to specify the technical aspects of current performance practise methods. For a musician it is very important to choose the right philosophy which shows a successful path to professional development.
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Of the Good Taste (2019) Aleksan Chobanov
This research topic is a result of a process of building up interest in vocal ornamentation and in particular the development of the vocal cadenza. The concrete choice of topic is a result of a course, followed at the Royal Conservatory of The Hague and I considered it important to my practice as a musician studying historically informed performance in the field of singing. This thesis aims to answer the following general question: Which prescriptions of "good taste" (suggestions for making tasteful ornamentation) in the performance of a cadenza are manifesting in a selection of 6 vocal treatises from the years 1723 to 1855 and how did the cadenza develop in that period As forthcoming and clarifying secondary questions are offered the following: What are the rules to be found in these treatises to help us make our own cadenzas being respectful to the “good taste” of the relevant time-period? What changes in the construction of the cadenza? How does the cadenza evolve in the course of the time between the treatises, is there a certain tendency? The way to receive answers to the questions above I hope to achieve in five steps through: 1. Researching the opinions in the treatises of the singing masters P. F. Tosi, J. Agricola, G.B. Mancini, J. A. Hiller, D. Corri, and M. Garcia II. 2. Making an overview of their guidelines and sentiments towards the tasteful performance of the cadenza (how was it and how it was supposed to get performed back then; what did they not like?). 3. Comparing their opinions with each other 4. Discussing the development of the cadenza in general in the introduction, referring to its instrumental appearance 5. Attempting to implement the mentioned rules in my own practice, hence in my final-exam through various as time-period pieces. Hence, the aim of this research – to find out what were the customs and rules and put forward the written opinions of singing masters who printed their theoretical works between the eighteenth and mid-nineteenth century. In that way, with interpretation of the rules and examples, hoping this paper to be able to give secure guidance to singers (including me) wishing to take up the direction of the so-called “good taste” for the relevant time period of the works they are performing as it would say in the treatises relevant for the time when the piece was composed.
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Singing in flow (2019) Marta Loncar
Research Question: How can a classically trained singer enhance the quality and efficiency of his/her practice sessions with the focus on specific short-term goals and their execution in the context of preparation process of a music composition, using the tools from the book Quality Practice by Susan Williams and the principles of the psychology of flow by Mihaly Csikszentmihaly? Summary of Results: If the quality of our performance depends on the quality of our practice, then it is necessary to work on the practice process itself. With this research I wanted to find out how would better management of short-term goals in my preparation process influence the quality of the process. According to what I have learned and experienced during my entire music education, I created a series of ten worksheets with specific, more or less usual exercises. With the help of the tools and exercises from the Exploration, External focus, Audiation chapters of the book Quality Practice by Susan Williams and principles of flow according to Mihaly Csikszentmihaly I enriched the content of the worksheets and improved their execution. Not only the process of creating the worksheets was enjoyable but also my practice sessions became more exciting, time saving and voice saving. I started feeling as the owner of my practice time and its content and I am going out of my practice room with a feeling of achievement and satisfaction.
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Wat brengt muziek teweeg bij mensen met dementie en wat brengt het spelen voor mensen met dementie teweeg bij mij als musicus? (2019) Roelina Schouten
Tijdens mijn onderzoek ben ik op bezoek geweest bij de Alde Steeg in Beuningen. Dit is een verzorgingshuis met bewoners met Dementie. Fase 2 tot Fase 4. Tijdens mijn onderzoek heb ik verschillende sessie gehad met bewoners van de Alde steeg. vanaf 26 november tot en met 11 Februari was ik daar om de week aanwezig met mijn harp. Elke sessie duurde 45 min. Tijdens de sessies speelde ik voor een groep van ongeveer 8 bewoners of individueel bij een bewoner op de kamer. De stukken die ik speelde waren allemaal onbekende muziek. Wat ik tijdens het spelen ontdekte is dat de verzorgers door de muziek weer/meer contact kunnen krijgen met de bewoners waar dit eerst niet mogelijk was. Tijdens de sessies was zichtbaar dat de bewoners zich meer gingen ontspannen, mee gingen zingen of met hun armen of benen gingen bewegen op het ritme van de muziek. In mijn onderzoek heb ik uiteen gezet wat dit voor mij als musicus heeft betekent en wat mijn ervaringen nu zijn, zodat andere musici die gaan werken met dementeerde dit kunnen gebruiken als voorstudie. Tijdens mijn presentatie zijn beelden te zien van de sessies en zal ik vertellen over mijn ervaringen. De kennis van de verzorgers (heb gesproken over de karakters en de eigenschappen van de bewoners), muzikanten die eerder projecten met deze doelgroep hebben uitgevoerd. (Renee Jonker, Julia Stegeman en Kim Erkens) hun kennis heb ik meegenomen in het reflecteren op mijn ervaringen.
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A Universal Language? - Challenges of crossover music-making (2019) Tom Goff
This research project explores the process of collaboration between musicians of classical training on orchestral instruments, and musicians working in the pop, jazz and folk genres. It focuses on the role of the conductor and investigates how they can best act as a mediator between members of distinct musical traditions, bringing together performers who effectively speak different languages. My musical activities span different genres within the jazz, classical, and pop worlds as a multi-instrumentalist, songwriter and composer/arranger. As a conductor it was natural for me to investigate the artistic possibilities and practical limitations of projects where these worlds meet. I did this primarily through interviews with six musicians from various backgrounds: Joe Duddell, Frank Veenstra, Clark Rundell, Tim Kliphuis, Bart Schneemann, and Rob Moose. These interviews are supplemented by secondary literature that is primarily focused on the differences in training of classical and jazz artists. Whilst reflecting on the challenges that crossover projects present, I began to question what those challenges say about the differences between these musical cultures. The research also includes reflections on my recent experience conducting parts of Mark-Antony Turnage’s Blood on the Floor with the Noord Nederlands Orkest. Scored for jazz quartet and chamber orchestra, this masterpiece is perhaps the beginning of a canon for orchestral-jazz crossover music, and my approach to preparing the performance was closely linked to the progress of this research and the accompanying interviews.
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The Application of The Taubman Approach to the Rehabilitation of Focal Dystonia: The Documentation of My Personal Experience (2019) Eloy García Pérez
It is a fact that playing-related injuries affect musicians to a great extent. The most optimistic studies show that at least 50% of musicians, amateurs or professionals develop an injury at some point in their artistic life. However, it is also a fact that the lack of information and prevention is widespread. As a result, many musicians, including myself, are not aware of the importance of developing a healthy technique and adopting injury-prevention habits. After many years of wrong technical approaches and constant physical tension when performing, I developed one of the most serious injuries existing, focal dystonia. The search for information about my own injury allowed me to discover the work of Dorothy Taubman. For several decades, this American pedagogue developed a piano method of her own that, apart from analyzing the biomechanical principles behind virtuosity, has obvious therapeutic effects on instrumentalists affected by injuries, including those of a serious nature like mine. Through this work, I expose the basic principles of this method and experiment with them in order to check if they have beneficial effects for my injury. My main conclusion is that, despite the fact that science considers focal dystonia incurable and irreversible, the application of healthy technical principles that take into account the biomechanical aspect of piano performing, can undoubtedly help to overcome this injury.
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Tenor in Puccini's opera (2019) Hao Wang
my research topic is The tenor in Puccini's operas, and my research question is what make Puccini's opera special? Secondly is how to singing Tenor's arias in Puccini's operas
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Youtube as a stage (2019) Sophie Vroegop
Youtube is an important and growing platform for classical music, for both audiences and performers. A wide array material can be found, from home video material of beginners playing their first concerts to relatively unknown pieces played by world class musicians all over the world. It feels like a treasure trove of inspiration, and I can almost no longer imagine studying and preparing new pieces without being able to do background research through YouTube. I would like to feel confident participating and creating my own videos to share on Youtube, and also provide a starting point for others who are interested in this. This study addresses classical musicians at the start of their professional career, comfortable with daily use of technology by birth, who would like to make recordings of their own playing within reasonable means. To explore the field of classical music videos, I performed interviews with relevant professionals in the field, such as Joram Letwory (videographer) and Diamanda Dramm (violinist). Based on these interviews, I have experimented with recording sound and video of myself, using readily available tools such as phone, iPad, and Zoom microphones. This research presentation includes the results of my experiments, as well as a list of guidelines and considerations to take into account when creating classical music videos.
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The road to freedom: Thinking in activity , Music and Alexander Technique (2019) Larissa Groeneveld
Name: Larissa Groeneveld Main Subject: Cello Research Supervisors: Anna Scott & Stephan van Dijk Title of Research: The road to freedom: Thinking in activity My Research Question: How can I make a connection between the core principles of AT and my own playing and teaching activities at the Royal Conservatoire The Hague ? The goal of this research project was to create a connection between the core principles of Alexander Technique (AT) and my musical practice and teaching. This was motivated by my interest and struggle to integrate this technique into my life. In order to do this, I first visited and talked with a vast number of AT teachers who are already working on this combination, I read many key books written in the field, took AT lessons on a regular basis, and clarified and reflected upon my ideas by making video recordings of my teaching activities. Finally, I came up with a series of concrete methods and exercises for applying the core principles of AT in musical contexts. I have also made a series of short videos that demonstrate some of these ideas. In doing all of this I realized what a challenge it is to remain healthy and open in an on-going process of development, especially with all the difficulties we encounter in modern life. These issues are urgent and should be taken seriously. I am now even more convinced that we can only find solutions if we ‘inhibit and direct.' Through further development I will continue to nurture and stimulate this process in the future.
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Tom Harrell: A Humble Brilliance (2018) Jan Toth
Name: Jan Toth Main Subject: Jazz Trumpet Research Supervisor: Patrick Schenkius Title of Research: Tom Harrell: A Humble Brilliance Research Question(s): What is it that makes Tom Harrell one of the most praised jazz trumpet players and composers in the world, and how did he achieve that despite his illness? How can we utilise Harrell's knowledge of music and apply it to our own playing? Summary of Results: Tom Harrell is one of those fascinating individuals that despite having history of weird behavior attributed to their illness like schizophrenia, managed to use his inspiration and hard work to become a jazz superstar and an idol to many trumpeters around the world. He is most often described by other musicians and his colleagues as a shy and modest person, both intelligent, and brilliant. In my research I was mostly analysing the brilliance of Mr. Harrell in his music. Beside the fact that he has written hundreds of compositions, some of which became standards, he is known for the lyricism of his playing, creating beautiful and melodic lines. I transcribed and analysed many of his solos to try and get into his way of thinking. He likes using aspects from the basic jazz vocabulary, but connects phrases in the way that it sounds very lyrical and appealing to the ear. He always chooses the prettiest notes and executes phrases with a warm sound. He rarely goes outside and when he does, he doesn't go far and always makes an esthetical figure out of it rather than to complicate things. In my research presentation I will be speaking more about his vocabulary and style of playing. I will demonstrate certain logical things he likes to play and how it can be practised and applied when playing with the band. You can clearly notice how much time and hard work Harrell invested in trumpet playing when you hear him consistently play his stuff through all 12 keys, with minimal difference in regard to the chorus played. His creativity can also be seen in his numerous compositions, which is something I will also touch in my research. Because of his mental condition, Tom Harrell had to live a very disciplinary life in order to make it work for him, which consequently also left him with many free hours to focus on his practising and writing. Biography: Jan Toth is a trumpet player born in Croatia, currently residing and studying in The Netherlands. He became very interested in music at the age of 11, when he first engaged in listening to jazz and blues recordings and started to play different styles of music in local bands. Jan finished the bachelor program at the Conservatory in Klagenfurt under Daniel Nösig, and is currently a student at the Conservatoire in The Hague, with Rik Mol as a mentor. In 2014 he passed the Marianne Mendt Competition to perform at the St. Pölten Jazz Festival alongside top Austrian musicians, and has since then (as well as before that) been a part of many different music projects.
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Finding the road less travelled (2019) Niels Tausk
Master thesis by Niels Tausk. This research focusses on harmony in jazz composition. It discusses the analysis of harmonic movement in several interesting jazz tunes. It also contains an interview with the composer Fred Hersch, regarding his writing proces. The outcome can be interesting for my composition students, to give them tools to broaden their harmonic possibilities. Finally I will discuss some of my own jazz compositions.
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Acknowledging The Current Generation Of Jazz Guitar (2019) Vito Vicar
No abstract has been provided by the author.
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The Importance of Rhythm in Jazz Voice Phrasing and Improvisation (2019) Anna Barbara Koziel
Practising irregular meters proved very effective in broadening the variety of rhythmic choices available when rephrasing an existing song or creating an improvisation. It also increased rhythmic security in interactions between the vocalist and the rest of the band in unpredictable situations. Providing that there is a strong integration of the body as the source of the core rhythm (groove) with the voice as the source of the sound, I found that a vocalist could achieve rhythmic freedom and spontaneity in performance in a relatively short period of time. Playing small percussion instruments such as shaker, guiro or cowbell also proved very helpful in developing rhythmic awareness, and moreover, when used on stage they create an additional texture in the sound of the whole band. Bigger instruments such as handpan, congas and djembe, demand more physical engagement, and might affect the fluency of the vocal lines and one's concentration on the main instrument. Practising these can take a lot more time, as they require a high level of fitness, and should be a conscious choice—a choice thus recommended only for vocalists who are aware of these demands.
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An E-flat Major Clarinet Concerto. The authorship issue between James Hook and Jean-Xavier Lefèvre (2016) Juan Jose Molero Ramos
Name: Juan José Molero Ramos Main Subject: Clarinet (Early music) Research supervisor: Charles Toet Title of Research: A Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra in E-Flat Major. The authorship issue between Mr. James Hook and Mr. Jean-Xavier Lefèvre Research Question: After discovering the same music written by two composers (J. Hook and J. X. Lefèvre), Who would be the authentic composer of the piece? Summary of Results: James Hook composed a Clarinet Concerto in E-flat Major in 1812 which seems to be the first English clarinet concerto in 19th century. Nobody realized before this concerto is the same music as Lefèvre’s Clarinet Concerto in E-flat Major. The reason is Lefèvre’s Clarinet Concerto was lost untill now. Internet Data systems (like RISM) make possible to locate Lefèvre’s score in the Russian State Library in Moscow. During the research process I discovered similarities between both concertos and I focused my research to clear this authorship issue. The tools used to be successful in my target was the comparison of the music itself from both composer between them and with the concerto, but also and more important, the bibliographic data of both original sources by using archives and documentation techniques.
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Hoftrumpeter in central Germany (2015) Patrice Boileau
Name: Patrice Boileau Main Subject: Baroque Trumpet Research Coach: Bart van Oort Title of Research: Hoftrompeter in central Germany Research Question: What would have been the professional life of court trumpet players in Thuringia/central Germany from 1650 to 1750? What kind of music did they play? Summary of Results: The baroque era seemed to have been the apogee of the art of trumpet playing by slowly raising it to an instrument of art. The instrument become part of an elite, where only few people could play it well and had the right to do so. In this paper I aim to illustrate the life and role of trumpet players at court, in parallel to those of other court musicians and the Stadtpfeifer. By the numerous courts present in central Germany, the trumpet seems to have blossomed with a variety of composers writing for the instrument. What was the court life for a musician, what were the daily duties of the trumpeters, would they only play music, would they mix with the other musicians and how were their relations with the others? Those are all questions that I addressed in this paper. At the end of my paper you can find a list of composers active in central Germany that composed for the trumpet and my own edition of two pieces by one of these composers. Biography: Patrice Boileau is a young and dynamic trumpet and cornetto player native of the Province of Québec in Canada. After his studies at the Conservatoire de musique de Québec, he completed an Artist Diploma in orchestral performance at The Glenn Gould School. Patrice is currently completing a master in baroque trumpet at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague with Susan Williams. Patrice has performed with several group in eastern Canada, such as the Orchestre Symphonique de Québec, Quebec City’s opera house, National Academy Orchestra, Sinfonia Toronto, the Sneak Peak Orchestra and the True North Brass. His passion for early music brought him recently to play with European ensemble such as Brabantsch Musyk Collegie, Elbipolis Barockorchester, The New Dutch Academy, The Wallfisch Band, Apollo Ensemble, Il Gardellino, and Les Agémens.
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Thrilling or killing? - Applying pictures in a classic concert performace (2015) Luise Kimm
Name: Luise Kimm Main Subject: Classical Singing Research Coaches: Gerda van Zelm, David Prins Title of Research: Thrilling or killing? – Applying pictures in a classical concert performance Research Question: What function can a screen have on the concert stage? Summary of Results: In concerts of classical music, more and more often extras are applied to the basic concepts of performance. This comes in light-shows, with pictures or a film-version of the piece on stage projected in the hall. Pleasing the eye has always been an issue on the concert stage of course. It is essential to consider how a performance should proceed and look like. But illustrating the music that is played in a concert has more consequences than only decorating the stage even a bit more or making a bigger impression in the audience. In my research paper, I document several formats of classical concert productions that used a visual interpretation in performance. In this case study I tried to figure out the function of screen and film on stage and their effect during the concerts. I summarized my findings in a list of ‘Do’s & Dont’s’. This list I, or others might use in a project where there is the wish to give a visual form to an own interpretation of a piece. In a second more theoretical part I shortly introduce music-historical background of the idea to illustrate classical music and the aesthetic discussion this idea rises. Furthermore I pay closer attention to the tool of the (electronic) screen in concert and to what a screen does with our brain. Biography: My name is Luise Kimm. I come from southern Germany. I am finishing my Master studies in classical singing at the Royal Conservatory. I have two bachelor degrees, one German one in musicology and voice and one Dutch one in classical singing. Next to my studies, and beforehand, I always performed. I sing as a soloist as well as in ensemble in churches, in concert and in opera throughout Europe.
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Research – Jewish composers in a social context (2016) Marc Wielart
Name: Marc Wielart Main Subject: Piano Research Supervisor: Gerard Bouwhuis Title of Research: Jewish composers in a social context Research Question: Should Jewish composers be programmed under the heading of their identity, considering their position in society and their artistic influence? Summary of Results: This research paper is a personal subject; belonging to a minority means to conceal a part of your identity when necessary. Ultimately, Jewish individuals who deepened their social awareness, contributed disproportionately by expressing their inner richness to the arts. Quite often composers of Jewish descent are being programmed because of their presumed identity. German speaking Jews shared in general a deep respect for German culture, language and national identity. Almost all of Jewish intellectuals identified themselves above all as ‘German’. In order to outline the social context of several influential Jewish composers, a journey leads us through correspondence and thoughts by intellectuals from the nineteenth century to the landmark of the Second Viennese School and Expressionism. Everyone’s artistic and personal development is an individual occasion. Jewish composers shared in general a high awareness of their social position and the political developments in the societies they were part of. The historical background of German-ruled Europe in the nineteenth century is important to understand the eventually cruel fate. German culture was both inclusive as exclusive, as I described in an introducing chapter on historical and social developments. Gradually artists of Jewish descent and loyalty were confronted with the downside of their culture: Exclusion. Today, we have access to an enormous amount of information, such as musical sources, correspondence, publications and interviews. While using the direct sources, we are able to set eyes on expressions of hatred, anxiety and alienation. Biography: Marc Wielart (1990) studied with pianists Ton Hartsuiker, Rian de Waal and Ellen Corver. Before this research he studied subjects as the relation of music to the fine arts, wrote a dissertation on the influence of Immanuel Kant on modern European artists and is active at informing on modern anti-Semitism.
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Developing one musical idea to its fullest (2019) Eunjin Bae
use ☰ -> edit workspace to open editor.
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Classical Trumpeter's Guide for Learning Jazz (2019) Mehmet Alper Unal
In the current music industry the borders between different music genres are getting more and more transparent and being a versatile musician has become a key skill for survival today, more than ever. This research is written to help the classically trained trumpet player transition into the jazz music field. It is not an all-encompassing study of jazz music, but rather a learning guide to further the trumpet player's knowledge. It is aimed to find out the advantages and disadvantages of having a classical education background and form a model practice routine for improving in jazz trumpet style, specifically tailored to address the classically trained trumpet players strong and week points according to the data provided by the interviews and literature review, provide them with the most essential tools necessary to be able to play the big band charts that they are likely to encounter during their career, with a solid time feeling and provide an entry level information for improvisation.
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Using the Trumpet to Create Metal: Jerome’s Reise um Die Erde (2019) Jerome Burns
The purpose of the present research was initially to explore new ways of playing the trumpet by fusing elements of metal into improvisation, seeking to achieve an authentic metal sound on the trumpet. Can and should the trumpet be used to create and experiment with heavy metal sounds, especially after intently studying Stockhausen’s LICHT opera cycle? The research project is multifaceted, combining my own personal dedication and keen interests in Meshuggah and Stockhausen together to unveil unexplored territory for the trumpet. An exploration of the music of groundbreaking metal band Meshuggah and researching ways of bringing trumpet playing to the world of metal led to deeper explorations of my own improvisations in general. The original idea of fusing trumpet and metal, Stockhausen and Meshuggah, became a new and exciting project altogether.
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Memorization for Guitarists (2019) Enno Voorhorst
Music can be memorized in several ways. The most easy way for the brains to memorize seems to be logical and the best way, because it provides space for other thoughts. The guitar is a complex instrument, therefore a good memorization strategy is an important issue.
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The connection between music and science. (2019) Stefania Pigozzo
The connection between music and science How can a deeper knowledge of mathematical matters like fractals and the Chaos Theory be used to shape my learning process and performance of Ligeti’s Fanfares?
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I don't know Up from Down (Bow) (2018) Jesse Feves
Name: Jesse Feves Main Subject: Violone Research Supervisor: Johannes Boer Title of Research: I don't know Up from Down (Bow) Research Question: How do I choose my bowings when playing J.S. Bach's Orchestral suite no.2 on 16 foot Violone? Summary of Results: Although all string players are interested in the problems of bowing, it remains a major point of discussion at rehearsals and takes up a lot of time. More often than not there is not enough time, short-cuts are taken, and the bowings are just a standard imposed on the music for ease of rehearsal. A phrase can be played differently with the same bowing directions or sound the same with different bowings. To be able to play a phrase the way I would like it should I practice until satisfied or change the bowings? Due to the lack of information on bowing directions of 16 foot Violone in the 18th century I have looked to visit treatises of the 18th century that contain information on bowing directions of the violin. This piece has been chosen in particular because much thematic material of the violins also occurs in the basso, enabling the possibility of comparing similarities and differences. The extent to which the 18th century rules of violin playing apply to the 16 foot Violone remains arguable, as the rules themselves. Biography: Jesse Feves, born and raised in Amsterdam, started his musical career transporting his mother’s harpsichord and sleeping under it. His older brother's example of terrific violin playing and hand-me-down violins served the tenderfoot well, studying with Coosje Wijzenbeek and Lorna Glover. Some years ago a new delight, the Double Bass, entered his life appreciating bass lines and drawing much inspiration from his father.
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Cello fingerings at Beethoven´s times (2019) Carlos Alfonso Nicolás
This research takes you into the world of the left hand cello technique during late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. We will look back into the different existing fingerings: left hand position, extensions, shifts, fourth finger and the use of the thumb with the possible explanations. Furthermore, we will understand the background for the cello to emerge as a solo instrument and the consequent evolution of cello technique and as well as the emergence of treatises. We will have to look at the influence of French and German cellists and conservatories in order to understand the spreading of cello technique to professional musicians and evaluate the treatises of the two great cellists close to Beethoven, Jean Louis Duport (1749-1819) and Bernhard Romberg (1767-1841). Moreover, important information about left hand position and fingering is found in printed scores for cello with original fingerings and in contemporary iconography. Beethoven´s cello sonatas will be used as a reference to show different historical fingerings, for instance from passages of the cello sonata op. 69. The influence of the fingering choices on the music result will close off the research.
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Are my hands able to speak as well as my mouth? (“70% you can show, 30% you must speak” Herbert von Karajan) (2019) Paul van Dalen
Research Proposal: Name: Paul van Dalen Studentnumber: 3165884 Main-Subject: HaFaBra-Conducting Main-Subject Teacher: Alex Schillings Supervisor: Jarmo Hoogendijk Date: 11-12-2017 Research Title: Are my hands able to speak as well as my mouth? (“70% you can show, 30% you must speak” Herbert von Karajan)
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collaboration between composer and performer (2019) Alona Kliuchka
Contemporary composers use new techniques and sounds to write music and try to be original, but if the composer does not have a good idea about how to play the instrument for which he is writing, and does not know the technical problems that the instrument have, there appears then the necessity of interpretate the music by the cellist, and somehow participate in process of composition too. I would like to follow the process of writing music for cello, and take part on this, so the creative moment of the composer is helped by me and my knowoledge of the instrument
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Jimmy Garrison, the wise one (2019) Raphaël Royer
My main goal is this research is to enlight important notions about Jimmy Garrison's playinginside the John Coltrane Quartet, from 1962 to 1965. By first defining his own style, I willlater on compare it with two other bass players who were part of that band before him toanalyse the reaction of the band related to what Garrison, Steve Davis and Reggie Workmanare playing. Then I will introduce Milt Hinton and Jimmy Bond to show were JimmyGarrison learned his basics. And the chapter about his legacy will be about Ben Street, inwhich I found common notion in his playing with Garrison. Eventually the last chapter will show the influence this research had on me by analysing afew songs I played thinking about Garrison's key notions, and notably 'A Love Supreme', thefamous album by Coltrane and the quartet. The final presentation in April the 3rd will be a talk and a musical discussion about myfindings, which means I will describe my results by talking and playing.
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Historical bow technique for rapid articulation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries (2019) Takuto Takagishi
Not much has been studied on bow technique for rapid articulation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. This is due to the fact that we lack sufficient material about bow strokes during the period, and the corresponding musical style and the types of bows changed drastically. In this exposition, I examine methods for playing rapid articulation by investigating treatises, etudes of the period, and prior research. My analysis of bow techniques will include experimentally playing rapid notes in at least six different ways, and I have recorded each execution. Their proper use depends on tempo, dynamics, character, and articulation. Natural bow bouncing and bouncing bow stroke (spiccato) require different techniques, and they make correspondingly different sounds. Spiccato was employed mainly for showing virtuosity and expressing particular emotion in solo pieces, but it is rarely used in orchestra or ensemble repertoire. The pre-Tourte-model bows were not ideally suited to for playing at the point of the bow. Martelé on the upper half of the bow was gradually used from the last decade of eighteenth-century with Tourte-model bows. The benefits of using martelé include gaining evenness of tone, and playing with a low-positioned right arm helps the execution of martelé. The bowstroke for rapid articulation should be decided eventually as demands of music based on these matters.
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Audition Training for the Bass Trombone Specialist (2019) Pedro Maia
This research describes a process of how to prepare auditions for a position as bass trombonist in a symphony orchestra. I first asked myself “What is the role and function of the bass trombonist in an orchestra and how has it changed over the last few centuries?; what skills does (s)he need? – (technical, musical, physical and psychological).
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The voice leading aspects of jazz piano comping in a quartet combo (2019) Luca Ridolfo
Since better voice leading will lead to better musicality, a proper study in this field will improve not only the comping skills but also the phrasing ones. In this research, the aspects of voice leading are covered to see the connection between the piano comping and the other players inside the quartet combo. Starting with a prior knowledge about comping and voice leading made of interviews to jazz pianists and jazz educators, plus other insights from various books, different approaches are taken in the research process to understand: the relationship between the top note of the comping and the soloist, the lower note of the comping and the bass line and the various problem encountered, like doublings, registers and change of positions. In order to have a firm understanding of voice leading, the piano comping in this research is limited at only 4 real parts harmony. As results, better voice leading will provide better accompaniments and a better understating of the instruments’ role inside the quartet and linear concepts.
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Application of the Syllables Qualities in Hexachord Solmization on the Renaissance Lute (2019) Balázs Tóth
Research question: How can we apply the hexachord solmization syllable qualities on the renaissance lute?
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Offences against the beat: The application of tempo rubato in string quartet performance of early 19th century repertoire (2019) Sophie Wedell
How was tempo rubato applied in string quartet performance in the early 19th century and how is it related to the structure and affect of a piece? Tempo flexibility is an important element of an expressive performance that captivates the audience and conveys the individual characteristics of a certain piece. While an abundance of research has been conducted on the history and application of different types of tempo rubato on various instruments, this aspect of chamber music performance has not received much attention so far. Few sources address the issue with respect to string quartet performance and the existing sources on orchestral playing could give the impression that tempo rubato was hardly used at all in chamber music. We do however find very detailed descriptions of this expressive means in keyboard treatises, such as the piano methods by Carl Czerny and Daniel Gottlob Türk. Taking into account such factors as the way the four parts interact with each other and the affect of a piece I attempted to find parallels between keyboard and chamber music performance and integrate them into a larger context of how tempo rubato was used at the time. I then chose musical examples of three different composers that I could apply my findings to and recorded my interpretations of these pieces on audio to document the outcome.
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Making a critical edition of a Viennese bass work. A case example: J. M. Sperger's Sextet Cassation in D Major (2019) Jussif Barakat
The original repertoire for the Viennese bass that has been published in the past 30 years has been often transcribed for the modern double bass tuned in fourths. This makes the idiomatic material of the Viennese bass quite challenging as it is unsuited to this instrument. Pioneers such as Klaus Trumpf have published many pieces of Viennese bass music but in all of the transcriptions they have altered the original key signatures, changed octaves and slightly changed the melodies, added a piano accompaniment instead of viola (Sperger's duet), and transposed the piece a tone higher for solo tuning modern double bass. In this respect, the published material lags very far behind recently published music for historical instruments. Gradually one can now find some of the original manuscripts of this repertoire online. Nonetheless, when performing these pieces with other players on historical instruments it is useful to have a modern transcription which is more practical to read, with bars numbers written in and where the necessary corrections have already been made. The Cassation in D that I chose to focus on is a challenging piece for all the members of the sextet including the bassist, at the same time it has an optimistic character with many idiomatic themes for the double bass. My goal for this research was to simply to present the original material for the Historically Informed Performer with the added conveniences for performance, and with some historical contextualization of the piece, as well as an analysis.
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Essential Rhythmical Features of the Modern Jazz Double Bass (2019) Ignacio Santoro
"Essential Rhythmical Features of the Modern Jazz Double Bass" - Which are the rhythmical elements that today’s bass players should study and how one can incorporate them their playing?
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Take a break with consciousness between practice sessions (2019) Junya Nomura
Main Subject: Classcial Cello Research Supervisor: Andrew Wright Title of Research: Take a break with consciousness between practice sessions Research Question: What is the effect of playing chess during practice breaks on the quality of practice? Research Summary: The research is about the measurement of the behaviour of mental focus during practice session by taking a different types of break. The discovery of different types of break can improve the quality of practice and can result in better mental focuses and performance. For the experiment to see the comparison between two types of breaks, I use ‘Chess’ as an activity during the practice break. Biography: Junya Nomura (born in Gifu, Japan 1994) began playing Cello at the age of 9. Nomura is studying Master of Classical Cello with Jan-Ype Nota and Lucia Swarts. Beside studying cello, Nomura is active in playing many ensembles and he wrote many arrangements in collaboration with Professional Orchestra as The Residentie Orkest and Atheneum Kamerorkest of the Young Talent Department of the Royal Conservatoire of the Hague. Nomura is the first student of Royal Conservatoire of the Hague, who attended one of the leading international educational music festival ‘The Pacific Music Festival’, founded by Leonard Bernstein.
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